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Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley called on the federal government Monday to sustain funding for aerospace research, calling the state's growing industry a critical part of the Maryland's "innovation economy. " During a tour of ATK Space Systems Division in Beltsville, the governor said it was the state's responsibility to make sure such companies have "a pipeline of skilled employees" but that the future of space technology depends on the federal government's commitment to the industry.  O'Malley called on Congress to avoid "applying the sort of mindless meat cleaver of sequestration cuts" which have been already forced Department of Defense employees onto furloughs.
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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley called on the federal government Monday to sustain funding for aerospace research, calling the state's growing industry a critical part of the Maryland's "innovation economy. " During a tour of ATK Space Systems Division in Beltsville, the governor said it was the state's responsibility to make sure such companies have "a pipeline of skilled employees" but that the future of space technology depends on the federal government's commitment to the industry.  O'Malley called on Congress to avoid "applying the sort of mindless meat cleaver of sequestration cuts" which have been already forced Department of Defense employees onto furloughs.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 15, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Employment in the defense and aerospace industry is expected to fall next year to its lowest level since Dwight D. Eisenhower was president, the leader of an industry trade group said yesterday.In his annual year-end review and forecast luncheon at the Capital Hilton yesterday, Aerospace Industries Association President Donald Fuqua said the industry is expected to shed 34,000 jobs in 1995, after losing 71,000 this year.Speaking to more than 500 officials of defense and areospace companies, including Westinghouse Electric Corp.
NEWS
By Stephen B. Awalt | December 16, 2012
Here they are, the greatest generation, looking pretty ordinary: armed now with carts and canes, bragging about their grandchildren, complaining about their doctors and relishing their deserts. Every other Monday night I visit my father at the Annapolis retirement community where he lives, and I have come to know the dinner menu as well as a bit about his friends from the World War II generation. At 90 my father doesn't say so much, but he and his dinner companions like the company of younger people (at 53, I count as younger)
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | December 7, 2007
ARLINGTON, Va. -- The aerospace industry, which employs tens of thousands of workers in Maryland, should post record sales this year, and the trend should continue into 2008, the Aerospace Industries Association said yesterday in its annual report. Led by increased shipments of commercial airliners and business jets, the association projects 2007 sales to be an all-time high of $198.8 billion, up from $183.3 billion last year. Next year, the association expects sales to rise 6 percent to $210.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | December 17, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The new year promises more of the same old gloom for the nation's defense and aerospace companies: more layoffs and lower sales "in every product category," the industry's top spokesman warned yesterday.In his annual speech looking ahead to the coming year, Donald Fuqua, president of the Aerospace Industries Association, told industry executives that the nation's producers of such things as commercial jet liners, fighter planes and radars are expected to eliminate another 47,000 jobs next year.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- After crying in its Alka-Seltzer for most of the 1990s, the aerospace industry enjoyed "a turnaround year" in 1996, a major trade association leader said yesterday.What's more, "the prospects for 1997 look even better," said Don Fuqua, president of the Aerospace Industries Association, during an annual year-end review and forecast luncheon at the Washington Hilton.Industry sales increased in 1996 for the first time in five years -- by 6 percent, to $112.4 billion, according to association figures.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun Reporter | December 14, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- The aerospace industry, a big driver of Maryland's economy, is about to close out its third year of record growth, with civilian and military orders up, and officials expect more of the same for 2007, according to an annual forecast by the Aerospace Industries Association released yesterday. Sales climbed $14.3 billion to $184.4 billion this year and are projected to rise to $195.4 billion next year, the forecast said. The industry is benefiting from a substantial increase in commercial orders, which are expected to outpace military sales next year, $54.6 billion to $53.5 billion respectively.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 17, 1999
PARIS -- Lockheed Martin Corp. and Aerospatiale Matra SA said yesterday that they will bid jointly for part of a South Korean aerospace company in what would be the first venture between the No. 1 U.S. defense contractor and France's biggest aerospace company.The two will bid on Korea Aerospace Industry Ltd., a new venture linking Samsung Aerospace Industries Co., Hyundai Space & Aircraft Co. and Daewoo Heavy Industries Co. Korea Aerospace has asked Western aerospace companies to bid for a stake of between 33 percent and 49 percent.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2002
WASHINGTON - The nation's aerospace industry is facing an economic and employment "crisis" that threatens to topple the United States from its position as the world leader in air transportation, space exploration and technology, according to a study released yesterday. A consolidated industry, aging work force and government apathy have combined to weaken the nation's industrial base and could threaten national security if allowed to continue, says a report from the Commission on the Future of the U.S. Aerospace Industry.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
Anxiety over federal budget cuts has big U.S. defense contractors slimming down, but an Israeli aerospace company is counting on expansion here. Israel Aerospace Industries' new ELTA North America subsidiary officially opened its headquarters in Howard County on Monday with a plan to go from nine employees to 100 in the next four years. ELTA, which makes radar and other defense electronic systems, will manufacture products from a small Fulton location with room to grow. The company's ribbon-cutting event drew both of Maryland's U.S. senators, Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, the governor and the lieutenant governor, all eager to praise the company for picking Maryland after considering six states.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | December 7, 2007
ARLINGTON, Va. -- The aerospace industry, which employs tens of thousands of workers in Maryland, should post record sales this year, and the trend should continue into 2008, the Aerospace Industries Association said yesterday in its annual report. Led by increased shipments of commercial airliners and business jets, the association projects 2007 sales to be an all-time high of $198.8 billion, up from $183.3 billion last year. Next year, the association expects sales to rise 6 percent to $210.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun Reporter | December 14, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- The aerospace industry, a big driver of Maryland's economy, is about to close out its third year of record growth, with civilian and military orders up, and officials expect more of the same for 2007, according to an annual forecast by the Aerospace Industries Association released yesterday. Sales climbed $14.3 billion to $184.4 billion this year and are projected to rise to $195.4 billion next year, the forecast said. The industry is benefiting from a substantial increase in commercial orders, which are expected to outpace military sales next year, $54.6 billion to $53.5 billion respectively.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2003
A sluggish economy and the Pentagon's dislike for all things French is having a chilling effect on this year's Paris Air Show, which has historically been a magnet for U.S. military and civilian aerospace contractors looking to display their wares before an international audience. Lockheed Martin, Boeing Co., Raytheon and other major manufacturers say they are sending fewer people and generally scaling back their presence at the world's largest aerospace exposition, which will take place June 15-22.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2002
WASHINGTON - The nation's aerospace industry is facing an economic and employment "crisis" that threatens to topple the United States from its position as the world leader in air transportation, space exploration and technology, according to a study released yesterday. A consolidated industry, aging work force and government apathy have combined to weaken the nation's industrial base and could threaten national security if allowed to continue, says a report from the Commission on the Future of the U.S. Aerospace Industry.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and By Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2000
A unit of Lockheed Martin Corp. signed a 10-year partnership agreement yesterday with Airways New Zealand to modernize the country's air traffic control system and pursue air management contracts in other regions. Lockheed Martin Air Traffic Management, the Rockville-based provider of air traffic control systems, will replace the New Zealand air traffic control system, including three area control centers and 17 tower systems, with its SkyLine technology. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1997
Ashurst Technology Ltd. has received a two-year, $142,000 contract from a Connecticut company to develop a lightweight titanium that could be used in the aerospace industry.Baltimore-based Ashurst said yesterday that the contract with United Technologies Research Center is part of a government research grant."We are taking titanium and its alloys and intentionally making it look like a sponge while getting it to maintain strength," said Timothy Langan, technical director of Ashurst Government Services Inc., a subsidiary of Ashurst.
NEWS
December 17, 1996
AMERICA emerges even more dominant in the world aerospace industry with Boeing's blockbuster $13.3 billion acquisition of McDonnell Douglas. This mighty duo, leapfrogging Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin Corporation to No. 1 spot on the U.S. scene, combines Boeing's leadership in the civil aircraft field with McDonnell Douglas' proud traditions in military aviation.It will make the new Boeing Co., with $48 billion in annual sales, an even more formidable competitor against Lockheed Martin in the fierce battle for the biggest prize in military aviation history -- the Joint Strike Fighter contract worth a minimum of $200 billion, with estimates ranging as high as $750 billion.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2000
Lockheed Martin Corp. announced yesterday that it will lay off 2,800 workers and streamline its aircraft and space systems businesses, the latest step in an effort to trim debt and restore investor confidence in the struggling defense giant. Yesterday's announcement brings the number of jobs cut by the Bethesda-based corporation to more than 4,500 in recent months, nearly all of them from the company's aircraft design and manufacturing plants in Georgia, Texas and California. Lockheed Martin, which employs about 140,000 worldwide, also will cut as many as 45 jobs from its 1,500-employee headquarters in Bethesda, company officials said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A Lockheed Martin Corp. Titan IVB rocket's failure to put a $800 million military communications satellite in the proper orbit April 30 stemmed from faults in testing, quality assurance and software development procedures, the Air Force said yesterday.The process didn't find and correct a software programming mistake made in early February by a software engineer for the No. 1 defense contractor's Denver-based astronautics sector, the Air Force said."The error went undetected by both the internal quality assurance processes and the independent verification and validation process," said the Air Force.
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