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By Darryll Pines | April 17, 2013
The future economic growth and competitiveness of the United States depends on our capacity to innovate. Many ideas have emerged from government, industry and academia regarding how best to inspire and support innovation. But nothing spurs creativity and innovation more than a combination of incentive and challenge: a reward for achievement, combined with the urgency of a dare to succeed and the reality that we must race against others. We are at our best when we compete. This is why I believe that prizes and competitions are crucial to create a climate of innovation and entrepreneurship, and for driving new advances in targeted areas.
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NEWS
April 29, 2014
As a passionate aerospace buff and American taxpayer, I'm discouraged a man of Capt. Gregory McWherter's talent, training and expertise would be relieved of his Blue Angels command based on allegations of a "nasty work environment. " I've read Susan Reimer 's account ( "Where are all the heroes?" April 28) and searched the Internet for what exactly Captain McWherter said or did, and I could find nothing. The word "allegation" is everywhere, yet there's no mention of the person or persons who filed these sexual harassment complaints.
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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley called on the federal government Monday to sustain funding for aerospace research, calling the state's growing industry a critical part of the Maryland's "innovation economy. " During a tour of ATK Space Systems Division in Beltsville, the governor said it was the state's responsibility to make sure such companies have "a pipeline of skilled employees" but that the future of space technology depends on the federal government's commitment to the industry.  O'Malley called on Congress to avoid "applying the sort of mindless meat cleaver of sequestration cuts" which have been already forced Department of Defense employees onto furloughs.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley called on the federal government Monday to sustain funding for aerospace research, calling the state's growing industry a critical part of the Maryland's "innovation economy. " During a tour of ATK Space Systems Division in Beltsville, the governor said it was the state's responsibility to make sure such companies have "a pipeline of skilled employees" but that the future of space technology depends on the federal government's commitment to the industry.  O'Malley called on Congress to avoid "applying the sort of mindless meat cleaver of sequestration cuts" which have been already forced Department of Defense employees onto furloughs.
BUSINESS
By Thomas C. Hayes and Thomas C. Hayes,New York Times News Service | February 4, 1992
DALLAS -- LTV Corp. said yesterday that it had agreed to sell its historic -- and profitable -- aerospace and missile businesses to a new company formed by Lockheed Corp. and Martin Marietta Corp.Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but analysts estimated the price at about $350 million in cash.LTV has been in bankruptcy since July 1986, when it contended that future pension claims of $2 billion in its steel operations were too costly for the company to honor. After a long legal battle, the Supreme Court ruled in 1990 that LTV must pay the claims.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1999
Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin Corp., struggling from setbacks in a military cargo plane program and delays in rocket launches, reported yesterday a second-quarter loss of $41 million, or 11 cents a share, on revenue of $6.2 billion.In the second quarter of last year, the world's second-largest aerospace company booked net income of $289 million, or 76 cents a share, on revenue of $6.5 billion.A loss had been expected because Lockheed had warned of a shortfall in early June. According to First Call Corp.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | October 16, 1993
United Industrial Corp. has picked Richard E. Erkeneff, a senior executive of McDonnell Douglas Corp., to head its struggling AAI Corp. subsidiary in Cockeysville.Mr. Erkeneff succeeds Thomas V. Murphy, who resigned under fire as president and chief executive in April following a sharp drop in AAI's earnings. The falloff was caused partly by a $23 million corporate restructuring and the disappointing performance of a commercial flight simulation company AAI acquired two years ago to lessen its dependence on a declining Pentagon budget.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1999
Workers at Middle River Aircraft Systems have approved a five-year labor contract, averting a strike by reversing an earlier vote against the pact.Members of Local 738 of the United Aerospace Workers union voted 402-141 in favor of the contract Thursday. The agreement is the same one employees rejected by a vote of 320-108 less than two weeks before."I guess people had a change of heart," said Pat Feehley, president of the local. "They realized it wasn't as bad as they thought it was."The union had set 11: 59 p.m. Thursday as a strike deadline, and some members were fearful of a work stoppage because the company said it had made its final offer.
NEWS
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
Johns Hopkins Medicine and defense contractor Lockheed Martin Corp. said Tuesday they would work together to create a safer and more efficient model for hospital intensive care units. The Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality at Hopkins and Lockheed will examine how technologies from the aerospace and defense industries can be used to reduce medical mistakes and improve patient safety and quality of care. Hopkins officials said ICUs currently use piecemeal approaches that are prone to errors.
BUSINESS
By ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH | July 1, 2005
ST. LOUIS - Boeing Co. named W. James McNerney Jr. as the new leader of the aerospace and defense giant yesterday, picking the 3M Co. chief over two senior Boeing executives. But in McNerney, Boeing will be getting one of the bluest of blue-chip executives. Trained by General Electric Co. as a manager and educated at Harvard and Yale, McNerney vowed yesterday to continue Boeing's recent momentum to restore a tarnished image with the Pentagon and to overtake European nemesis Airbus SAS as the world leader in commercial jet deliveries.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
John S. "Bud" Linz, a retired engineer and World War II veteran, died Wednesday of pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 90. The son of a grocer and a homemaker, John Sebastian Linz was born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown. After graduating in 1941 from Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington, he began studies at the Johns Hopkins University. Mr. Linz left Hopkins to enlist in the Army and served with the 99th Infantry Division in Europe. He fought at the Battle of the Bulge, where he was wounded and earned a Purple Heart.
NEWS
RECORD STAFF REPORT | May 29, 2013
Nicholas Wayne Hancock, a 2009 graduate of Havre de Grace High School, has graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy with a bachelor of science in aerospace engineering. Hancock was commissioned on May 24 as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps. He will continue his training in Quantico ,Va., for six months and then training in Pensacola, Fla., as a naval flight officer. Hancock's parents are Lisa Buonaugurio and Wayne Hancock of Havre de Grace. His grandparents are Nick and Elly Buonaugurio of Aberdeen.
NEWS
By Darryll Pines | April 17, 2013
The future economic growth and competitiveness of the United States depends on our capacity to innovate. Many ideas have emerged from government, industry and academia regarding how best to inspire and support innovation. But nothing spurs creativity and innovation more than a combination of incentive and challenge: a reward for achievement, combined with the urgency of a dare to succeed and the reality that we must race against others. We are at our best when we compete. This is why I believe that prizes and competitions are crucial to create a climate of innovation and entrepreneurship, and for driving new advances in targeted areas.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
Anxiety over federal budget cuts has big U.S. defense contractors slimming down, but an Israeli aerospace company is counting on expansion here. Israel Aerospace Industries' new ELTA North America subsidiary officially opened its headquarters in Howard County on Monday with a plan to go from nine employees to 100 in the next four years. ELTA, which makes radar and other defense electronic systems, will manufacture products from a small Fulton location with room to grow. The company's ribbon-cutting event drew both of Maryland's U.S. senators, Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, the governor and the lieutenant governor, all eager to praise the company for picking Maryland after considering six states.
NEWS
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
Johns Hopkins Medicine and defense contractor Lockheed Martin Corp. said Tuesday they would work together to create a safer and more efficient model for hospital intensive care units. The Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality at Hopkins and Lockheed will examine how technologies from the aerospace and defense industries can be used to reduce medical mistakes and improve patient safety and quality of care. Hopkins officials said ICUs currently use piecemeal approaches that are prone to errors.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
Edward G. Uhl, former president of Fairchild Industries who was co-inventor of the M-1 bazooka during World War II, died Sunday of heart failure at William Hill Gardens, an Easton assisted-living facility. The Oxford resident was 92. Born and raised in Elizabeth, N.J., the son of a mechanic and a homemaker, Mr. Uhl was a 1936 graduate of Jefferson High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in engineering physics in 1940 from Lehigh University, where he had been a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1999
Creating a major new player in aerospace and defense electronics, AlliedSignal Inc. said yesterday that it has signed an agreement to purchase Honeywell Inc. for about $14.8 billion worth of stock based on yesterday's closing prices.The merger will produce an industrial conglomerate with $25 billion in annual sales. The new company will adopt the more recognizable Honeywell name, but will occupy AlliedSignal's headquarters in Morristown, N.J.Honeywell has been based in Minnesota for more than 100 years, while the AlliedSignal name dates to a 1985 merger.
NEWS
March 24, 1991
The Bendix Field Engineering Corp. of Columbia has been selected by the Defense Nuclear Agency to continue providing technical services in support of the DNA's Nevada test site.The five-year contract isvalued at approximately $13 million.BFEC is a technical services unit of Allied-Signal Aerospace Co.,a part of Allied-Signal Inc. with businesses in aerospace, automotive products and engineered materials.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2010
D. Richard Tarallo, a retired Martin Marietta Corp. aerospace engineer who was a Navy aviator during World War II, died Saturday on his 94 t h birthday of complications from a stroke at St. Joseph Medical Center. A resident of the Mercy Ridge retirement community in Lutherville since 2005, Mr. Tarallo lived for many years on Hickory Lot Road in Towson. Born and raised in New York City, the son of immigrants from Naples, Mr. Tarallo was educated in city public schools.
NEWS
By Paul West | paul.west@baltsun.com | March 11, 2010
Maryland employers, particularly those in the defense and aerospace industries, could take a hit from an election-year decision Wednesday by House Democrats to ban corporate earmarks in 2010. In an attempt to contest Republicans for the "reform" mantle, Democratic leaders in the House said they won't approve funding requests for corporate projects this year. Such earmarks are among the most controversial because of the potential for scandal. House Republicans responded by calling for an end to all earmarks, not just those that go directly to corporations.
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