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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2002
U.S. bioterrorism experts are studying a previously unknown 1971 accident in which a secret Soviet military test of smallpox in aerosol form infected a woman on a ship 10 miles away. The resulting outbreak, which killed three people and sickened seven others, has worrisome implications for the potential of smallpox as a terrorist weapon, said Alan Zelicoff, a senior scientist at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico who has studied a classified Soviet report on the outbreak and interviewed two victims.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
A police officer sustained minor burns after responding to a call of a burglary at a Northeast Baltimore apartment building and being confronted by a man wielding a makeshift blowtorch made from an aerosol can, police said. The officer shot at the man, identified as Sean Lee, 44, but he missed and Lee retreated into his apartment and barricaded himself inside, according to police. Lee eventually gave himself up, and police said Saturday that he will face assault, destruction-of-property and arson charges in connection with the incident.
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FEATURES
By John Javna and John Javna,The EarthWorks Group | December 22, 1990
How many aerosol cans do you have around your home? Five? Ten? If you're an average American, you have about 46, according to sources at the Environmental Protection Agency. Surprised? Well, think of all the aerosol products that are available: shaving cream, bathroom cleaners, rug shampoo, spray paint, hair spray, insect sprays, room deodorizers, automotive products -- the list goes on.Aerosol spray cans were introduced in 1941. According to one industry executive, "The forerunner of today's aerosol was first widely used to protect U.S. servicemen from mosquitoes and malaria during World War II."
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Special to the Sun | July 11, 2004
When it comes to summer dresses, we know what we like: A skirt that flutters in the breeze, a natural-fiber material like cotton or linen in a fun print, a top that shows some skin without being too skimpy. We'd like a dress that can be slipped on after a dip in the pool, a dress that could take us out to dinner or out for a chocolate snowball. The dress that has our vote this summer is a pink and yellow Tahitian floral number from Garnet Hill. The dress, cut on the bias, has a circle skirt that hangs beautifully, a timeless jazzy print evocative of Paul Gauguin's paintings and a sweet taffeta ribbon belt.
NEWS
September 3, 2003
Robert Abplanalp, 81, a confidant of President Richard Nixon and inventor who changed aerosol technology, died of cancer Saturday in Bronxville, N.Y. In 1969, Mr. Abplanalp lent Nixon the money to buy the 29-acre property at San Clemente, Calif., that became the western White House. After Nixon resigned over Watergate in 1974, Mr. Abplanalp flew to California to be with him. Mr. Abplanalp ran the Precision Valve Corp., which he started in 1949 to manufacture a patented aerosol valve. This plastic model could be mass produced, and was more efficient.
FEATURES
By Daniel P. Jones and Daniel P. Jones,Hartford Courant | July 22, 1993
As a professional actor, Stuart Evans is used to appreciation from audiences.But nothing prepared him for the adulation he got from a crowd of children recently at the Bushnell Memorial in Hartford, Conn., while playing a TV cartoon character called Captain Planet, an environmental superhero.Schoolchildren mobbed the 28-year-old Wethersfield, Conn., actor and clamored for autographs. Many grilled him about his exploits battling eco-villains such as Hoggish Greedly, Looten Plunder and Duke Nukem.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1992
New positions* Aerosol Monitoring & Analysis Inc., a Hanover-based environmental consulting company, named E. Rush Barnett vice president and director of training and Joseph A. Coco vice president and technical director.* Schiller, Holinsky & Co., an accounting and business consulting company in Owings Mills, named Simpson H. Gardyn, Michael Katz, Alan Z. Weinberg and Martin I. Yospa shareholders and directors of the firm.* Pear, Fagan & Bormel, a Laurel-based accounting firm, named Anna E. R. Huyett, Mario F. Maresca and Jill M. Mooty partners.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Special to the Sun | July 11, 2004
When it comes to summer dresses, we know what we like: A skirt that flutters in the breeze, a natural-fiber material like cotton or linen in a fun print, a top that shows some skin without being too skimpy. We'd like a dress that can be slipped on after a dip in the pool, a dress that could take us out to dinner or out for a chocolate snowball. The dress that has our vote this summer is a pink and yellow Tahitian floral number from Garnet Hill. The dress, cut on the bias, has a circle skirt that hangs beautifully, a timeless jazzy print evocative of Paul Gauguin's paintings and a sweet taffeta ribbon belt.
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 9, 1991
Pssssssst! Used any aerosols lately? You know. Those point-and-shoot cans with the little button on top. Press down, and tiny droplets of something or other rocket out to coat your target -- whether it's your underarm, your bicycle chain or the collar of the shirt you are ironing.If you have used aerosols, you may have noticed a warning label on the can: Contents under pressure. Do not puncture or incinerate. The warning refers to the gases inside that are responsible for delivering the active ingredient -- antiperspirant, lubricating oil, starch or whatever.
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 22, 1992
Dear Ms. Household Environmentalist: We've been informed that CFCs were banned from use in aerosols in the United States in the late 1970s. Does that mean that aerosols are environmentally benign? If so, why are pumps still being offered as an alternative?Dear Reader: Chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, have been fingered as the big villains in the destruction of the ozone layer, a layer of gases high in the stratosphere that shield the Earth from dangerous ultraviolet rays. CFCs are artificial chemical compounds that have a variety of very useful properties.
NEWS
September 3, 2003
Robert Abplanalp, 81, a confidant of President Richard Nixon and inventor who changed aerosol technology, died of cancer Saturday in Bronxville, N.Y. In 1969, Mr. Abplanalp lent Nixon the money to buy the 29-acre property at San Clemente, Calif., that became the western White House. After Nixon resigned over Watergate in 1974, Mr. Abplanalp flew to California to be with him. Mr. Abplanalp ran the Precision Valve Corp., which he started in 1949 to manufacture a patented aerosol valve. This plastic model could be mass produced, and was more efficient.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 31, 2002
MOSCOW - Russia acknowledged yesterday that it pumped an aerosol version of the powerful painkiller Fentanyl into a Moscow theater to end a hostage crisis Saturday, breaking a four-day silence on the drug's identity that had drawn increasing criticism in the United States and Europe. Russia's health minister, Yuri L. Shevchenko, identified the gas as the civilian death toll from the 57-hour hostage siege rose by two to 120. All but two of the victims apparently died from effects of the Fentanyl derivative.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2002
U.S. bioterrorism experts are studying a previously unknown 1971 accident in which a secret Soviet military test of smallpox in aerosol form infected a woman on a ship 10 miles away. The resulting outbreak, which killed three people and sickened seven others, has worrisome implications for the potential of smallpox as a terrorist weapon, said Alan Zelicoff, a senior scientist at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico who has studied a classified Soviet report on the outbreak and interviewed two victims.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
The death Tuesday of a Westminster teen-ager, apparently from inhaling air freshener, has left educators, substance abuse counselors, police and parents wondering what can be done to prevent a similar tragedy.Thomas W. McDonald, 16, was found slumped over the steering wheel of a car behind a Westminster shopping center. The engine was running and city police found two nearly empty cans of air freshener -- one on his lap, the other beside him -- which have led investigators to suspect death by huffing.
FEATURES
By Daniel P. Jones and Daniel P. Jones,Hartford Courant | July 22, 1993
As a professional actor, Stuart Evans is used to appreciation from audiences.But nothing prepared him for the adulation he got from a crowd of children recently at the Bushnell Memorial in Hartford, Conn., while playing a TV cartoon character called Captain Planet, an environmental superhero.Schoolchildren mobbed the 28-year-old Wethersfield, Conn., actor and clamored for autographs. Many grilled him about his exploits battling eco-villains such as Hoggish Greedly, Looten Plunder and Duke Nukem.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1992
New positions* Aerosol Monitoring & Analysis Inc., a Hanover-based environmental consulting company, named E. Rush Barnett vice president and director of training and Joseph A. Coco vice president and technical director.* Schiller, Holinsky & Co., an accounting and business consulting company in Owings Mills, named Simpson H. Gardyn, Michael Katz, Alan Z. Weinberg and Martin I. Yospa shareholders and directors of the firm.* Pear, Fagan & Bormel, a Laurel-based accounting firm, named Anna E. R. Huyett, Mario F. Maresca and Jill M. Mooty partners.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
A police officer sustained minor burns after responding to a call of a burglary at a Northeast Baltimore apartment building and being confronted by a man wielding a makeshift blowtorch made from an aerosol can, police said. The officer shot at the man, identified as Sean Lee, 44, but he missed and Lee retreated into his apartment and barricaded himself inside, according to police. Lee eventually gave himself up, and police said Saturday that he will face assault, destruction-of-property and arson charges in connection with the incident.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
The death Tuesday of a Westminster teen-ager, apparently from inhaling air freshener, has left educators, substance abuse counselors, police and parents wondering what can be done to prevent a similar tragedy.Thomas W. McDonald, 16, was found slumped over the steering wheel of a car behind a Westminster shopping center. The engine was running and city police found two nearly empty cans of air freshener -- one on his lap, the other beside him -- which have led investigators to suspect death by huffing.
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 22, 1992
Dear Ms. Household Environmentalist: We've been informed that CFCs were banned from use in aerosols in the United States in the late 1970s. Does that mean that aerosols are environmentally benign? If so, why are pumps still being offered as an alternative?Dear Reader: Chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, have been fingered as the big villains in the destruction of the ozone layer, a layer of gases high in the stratosphere that shield the Earth from dangerous ultraviolet rays. CFCs are artificial chemical compounds that have a variety of very useful properties.
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 9, 1991
Pssssssst! Used any aerosols lately? You know. Those point-and-shoot cans with the little button on top. Press down, and tiny droplets of something or other rocket out to coat your target -- whether it's your underarm, your bicycle chain or the collar of the shirt you are ironing.If you have used aerosols, you may have noticed a warning label on the can: Contents under pressure. Do not puncture or incinerate. The warning refers to the gases inside that are responsible for delivering the active ingredient -- antiperspirant, lubricating oil, starch or whatever.
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