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NEWS
April 13, 1995
Edward B. Crosland, 83, a former senior executive of AT&T Corp. who chaired the board of the Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts, died Tuesday of bone marrow failure and complications from anemia. As chairman of the Vienna, Va., foundation, he led supporters of the only U.S. national park for the performing arts.Annie Fischer, 80, one of Hungary's greatest pianists, died Monday in Budapest. A child prodigy, she won the first Franz Liszt piano competition in 1933 and played in major concert halls in Europe, the United States and Australia.
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FEATURES
By John Johnson Jr. and John Johnson Jr.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 2005
One is as famous as a rock star in his native Japan. Another is a veteran military pilot once rejected as undersized for a Russian space flight. A third is an Air Force colonel who is about to take her fourth trip into space. To one another, they are "Squeegee," "Too Short" and "Mom." To the rest of the world, they and their colleagues are a bunch of not-quite-average Americans, plus a Japanese, who will be the first to take the teeth-rattling ride into orbit since the Columbia space shuttle accident about 2 1/2 years ago. As ambassadors for a humbled NASA, the seven-member crew of Discovery - scheduled to be launched tomorrow - has become the most photographed and interviewed set of spacefarers in nearly two decades.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | October 10, 1991
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration awarded the University of Maryland a $5 million grant yesterday to develop a "brain bank" at the College Park campus to help industry develop new commercial applications for satellite communications.Anthony Ephremides, a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Maryland and co-director of the center, said that the new center will have input from professors at the Johns Hopkins University, University of Colorado at Boulder and West Virginia University.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush chose Michael D. Griffin yesterday to be the new head of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, putting a scientist with technical and management expertise in charge of the space program's ambitious plans to go back to the moon and on to Mars. Griffin, 55, who is director of the space department at the John Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory, must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate to become the 11th administrator of NASA. But early congressional reaction was effusive.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 20, 2003
Ron Dittemore, director of NASA's space shuttle program, is expected to resign as early as this week and move to a new job in private industry, a government source said yesterday. Immediately after the Columbia loss Feb. 1, Dittemore took the lead role in explaining what the National Aeronautics and Space Administration knew before the accident and whether there was anything it could have done to prevent it. Dittemore said in the days after the accident, which killed seven astronauts, that he did not believe foam debris falling off the shuttle's external tank could have caused the tragedy.
NEWS
December 31, 1991
A NASA astronomer said yesterday that he tried and failed Dec. 20 to use the world's largest radio telescope to get a radar image of a puzzling, asteroidlike object that passed within 288,000 miles of Earth.Astronomers had hoped the observation would settle the question of whether the object -- which is circling the sun in an orbit slightly larger than that of the Earth -- is a highly unusual asteroid or a piece of booster rocket somehow tossed out of Earth orbit.Instead, the tiny object, which may be less than 20 feet long, remains a mystery.
NEWS
February 2, 1992
Young viewers of WGN, on North Arundel Cable TV channel 3, can watch"The Cosmic Challenge . . . For Kid's Sake," to learn about space, and enter a contest to win a trip to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala.The show will bebroadcast at 8 p.m. Feb. 3.Viewers who learn enough about space to answer nine questions cansend their answers to WGN's Cosmic Challenge, 2501 Bradley Plcae, Chicago, Ill. 60618, by 5...
NEWS
August 10, 1997
John J. Martin, a retired NASA administrator and associate deputy director of the Central Intelligence Agency during the Nixon administration, died Thursday of complications from Parkinson's disease at Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 74.Born in Detroit and raised in South Bend, Ind., Mr. Martin graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 1943 with a degree in mechanical engineering.He enlisted in the Navy in 1943, was commissioned a lieutenant and served in Guam.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | December 11, 1990
WASHINGTON -- NASA should learn to live without the space shuttle and should scale back other manned projects, a White House committee recommends.Labeling the shuttle a "weak link" in the nation's space program, the panel of 12 scientists and aerospace executives yesterday called on the space agency to "phase down" the shuttle system in favor of a less complicated launch vehicle that could carry human crews when necessary."
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 15, 1998
MIAMI -- Insisting that you're never too old for high-flying adventure, John Glenn -- the first American to orbit Earth and an influential senator -- is this close to blasting back into space this year.At the age of 77.The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is leaning toward approving his 10-day flight aboard shuttle Discovery in October. A decision could come in a few days."We're certainly looking at it," NASA spokesman Brian Welch said yesterday. "We take him seriously. There's a lot of buzz about it around here."
ENTERTAINMENT
By New York Times News Service | May 2, 2004
Urgent: HQ Direction," began a message e-mailed on April 1 to dozens of scientists and officials at the Goddard Space Flight Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in Greenbelt. It was not an alert about an incoming asteroid, a problem with the space station, or a solar storm. It was a warning about a movie. In The Day After Tomorrow, a $125 million disaster film that is to open on May 28, global warming from accumulating smokestack and tailpipe gases sets off an instant ice age. Few climate experts think such a prospect is likely, especially in the near future.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 22, 2003
Residents of Mid-Atlantic states may get an opportunity to witness some high-altitude science tomorrow night as NASA launches a series of atmospheric research rockets from its Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia's Eastern Shore. Three rockets will be launched 90 minutes apart. They will soar 56 to 109 miles above the Atlantic Ocean, then release chemicals to form milky-white clouds visible in the night sky. A fourth rocket will carry instruments. Scientists from the University of Texas, Clemson University and Utah State University will monitor the clouds through long-range cameras to learn about winds in the ionosphere - a hard-to reach region near the edge of space.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 20, 2003
Ron Dittemore, director of NASA's space shuttle program, is expected to resign as early as this week and move to a new job in private industry, a government source said yesterday. Immediately after the Columbia loss Feb. 1, Dittemore took the lead role in explaining what the National Aeronautics and Space Administration knew before the accident and whether there was anything it could have done to prevent it. Dittemore said in the days after the accident, which killed seven astronauts, that he did not believe foam debris falling off the shuttle's external tank could have caused the tragedy.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2003
After waking up Saturday morning to the space shuttle Columbia breaking apart on national television, the events staff at Baltimore-Washington International Airport figured they'd have to find a new speaker for their annual Black History Month event. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's deputy administrator, Frederick D. Gregory, would surely be too busy, too broken up to tell a crowd of strangers about his life spent overcoming the obstacles that history had placed in his way. He would be shuttling between Houston and Washington, consoling the grieving families and supervising an investigation into what went wrong aboard the ill-fated mission.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2003
HOUSTON - In a somber ceremony yesterday, President Bush told the families and colleagues of the seven astronauts lost aboard the space shuttle Columbia that the crew had perished in a great cause that the nation would continue to pursue. Speaking to thousands beneath a brilliant Texas sky at the Johnson Space Center, Bush said the astronauts would be enshrined forever in the nation's memory. "To leave behind Earth and air and gravity is an ancient dream of humanity. For these seven, it was a dream fulfilled," Bush said.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 3, 2003
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - Felix Alberto Soto Toro still wants to be an astronaut, now more than ever. He has dreamed of floating among the stars since he was 6. As a student at Florida Institute of Technology 17 years ago, he watched the Challenger explode. But he dug in: He joined the National Aeronautics and Space Administration that same year, went on to earn a doctorate in electrical engineering and is now taking flying lessons. The loss of the shuttle Columbia on Saturday was brutal.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | December 24, 1994
NASA has selected a Johns Hopkins University design for a $30 million camera to be installed in the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope in 1999.The Hubble Advanced Camera for Exploration (HACE) will be a major advance over the telescope's current camera, the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2. That instrument was installed during the space shuttle Endeavour's rescue mission last December.HACE will greatly enhance the telescope's "superlative imaging capabilities well into the next century," said Dr. Edward Weiler, NASA's Hubble program scientist.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and its contractors are expected to eliminate more than 4,000 jobs by the end of the year because of the White House decision to scale back the space station, according to NASA and industry sources.The cutbacks from a work force of 11,000 will hit several areas hard. McDonnell Douglas Aerospace plans to lay off about 1,000 workers in Huntington Beach, Calif., Houston and St. Louis, a company official confirmed yesterday.McDonnell Douglas expects its subcontractors to let go another 1,000 workers, while cuts at Grumman Corp.
TOPIC
By J. Scott Orr | August 5, 2001
Man has been in outer space for 40 years. The first American woman went up 18 years ago. So far, NASA insists, there has been no carnal docking aboard any of its missions. Sure, there were rumors when a married couple flew aboard a space shuttle mission in 1992, but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration says two tiny fish are the only couple to experience the joys of sex in true weightlessness. That could soon change. Space tourism, now a reality after American businessman Dennis Tito spent $20 million for a trip aboard a Russian spacecraft to the orbiting International Space Station, has caused the question of sex in space to be viewed with a bit more gravity.
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