Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAeroflot
IN THE NEWS

Aeroflot

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 6, 1999
MOSCOW -- Everywhere he looks, Russia's most powerful tycoon sees Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov coming after him.Boris Berezovsky comes under more pressure every day -- with investigators raiding his holdings, spectacular revelations in the press, and thinly veiled threats from Primakov himself.But that might be the only way to tackle a man who, among other attributes, has long enjoyed the confidence of President Boris N. Yeltsin and his family.The prime minister had presented a mild face to the nation for nearly five months, seemingly trying to do nothing wrong by doing practically nothing at all. But now he has latched onto a campaign against economic crime in general and against the one man in particular who more than any other embodies the power and arrogance of Russia's financial oligarchs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 23, 1999
MOSCOW -- The placemat was big as Siberia, the matching linen napkin crisp as the ever-falling snow. The smile on the face of the flight attendant was as effervescent as the champagne in his outstretched hand.It was first-class all the way, from the deep leather seat to the free pair of slippers. Could this really be Aeroflot?Was this the same airline that once resembled a bus station in the sky? Was this the airline where the carpets were soiled and the seat belts sometimes broken? Everyone who has ever flown it has his own Aeroflot story, and they are never pretty.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 13, 1991
MOSCOW -- Across the country, travelers arrived at airports yesterday, only to find that no planes would be flying anywhere.One-third of the country's 350 airports were closed, and dozens more were expected to follow suit at any time, according to officials at the Soviet Civil Aviation Ministry.It may be the hallmark of the tumultuous situation -- political triumphs are quickly overshadowed by economic disasters.The announcement of Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's success in forging a Commonwealth of Independent States was followed within minutes by a report from the Tass news agency that 92 airports had stopped operating for lack of fuel and that 38 more were using up their last gallons.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 6, 1999
MOSCOW -- Everywhere he looks, Russia's most powerful tycoon sees Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov coming after him.Boris Berezovsky comes under more pressure every day -- with investigators raiding his holdings, spectacular revelations in the press, and thinly veiled threats from Primakov himself.But that might be the only way to tackle a man who, among other attributes, has long enjoyed the confidence of President Boris N. Yeltsin and his family.The prime minister had presented a mild face to the nation for nearly five months, seemingly trying to do nothing wrong by doing practically nothing at all. But now he has latched onto a campaign against economic crime in general and against the one man in particular who more than any other embodies the power and arrogance of Russia's financial oligarchs.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 23, 1999
MOSCOW -- The placemat was big as Siberia, the matching linen napkin crisp as the ever-falling snow. The smile on the face of the flight attendant was as effervescent as the champagne in his outstretched hand.It was first-class all the way, from the deep leather seat to the free pair of slippers. Could this really be Aeroflot?Was this the same airline that once resembled a bus station in the sky? Was this the airline where the carpets were soiled and the seat belts sometimes broken? Everyone who has ever flown it has his own Aeroflot story, and they are never pretty.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 24, 1994
MOSCOW -- Emergency workers fought their way through 9 feet of snow yesterday to the Siberian crash site of an Aeroflot plane bound for Hong Kong, while in Moscow the disaster underscored already urgent questions about the airline's reliability.All 75 people aboard the 183-seat Airbus A-310 jetliner were killed.Air traffic controllers in Novokuznetsk said the plane vanished suddenly from their radar screens early Wednesday morning. There was no distress signal, and several experts here said that that strongly suggests a midair explosion.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 15, 1994
MOSCOW -- Russian aviation boasts some of the world's smallest airlines, dirtiest planes, best pilots, worst weather conditions, remotest airports, most confusing bureaucracy, and best-trained but overstretched safety inspectors.Added up, it means that Russia meets international safety standards -- but barely -- according to a joint U.S.-Russian air safety report released yesterday.It means that flying in Russia is not quite so dangerous as some organizations, such as the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, had suggested.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | July 28, 1996
MANY YEARS AGO I got on a jet owned by Colombia's national airline. It was in the hot coastal city of Cartagena, and bound for the mountain capital, Bogota. We sat boiling on the tarmac for about an hour, until a drunk stumbled up the stairway and fell into a seat. Then he raised his head, and said in a slurred voice to the rest of us:"Don't worry, the pilot will be along in a minute. I've been with him all night."It was one of the longest flights of my life. On the ground in Bogota, I found out it was a joke.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby N | September 24, 1991
It should be easier for Baltimore businesses to export goods to the Soviet Union under an agreement announced yesterday between USAir and the Soviet carrier, Aeroflot.Under terms of the agreement, Soviet imports will arrive at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York, where they will be transferred to USAir jets for shipment to hundreds of locations in the United States or be put onto trucks for other destinations.On the flip side, USAir will transport American goods to JFK Airport, where the cargo will be loaded aboard Aeroflot jets and flown to the Soviet Union.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1994
Manufacturers' profits riseU.S. manufacturers saw higher profits in the fourth quarter than in the same quarter of 1992, the Commerce Department said yesterday.After-tax profits averaged 3 cents per dollar of sales, adjusted for seasonal variations, up from 1.3 cents in the year-earlier quarter.Durable goods manufacturers had profits of $8.5 billion in the fourth quarter, compared with a loss of $3.6 billion in the 1992 quarter.Russian airline adds Boeing jetTransaero Airlines, the Moscow-based airline spun off from Aeroflot, has become the first Russian carrier to add a new Boeing airplane to its fleet.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | July 28, 1996
MANY YEARS AGO I got on a jet owned by Colombia's national airline. It was in the hot coastal city of Cartagena, and bound for the mountain capital, Bogota. We sat boiling on the tarmac for about an hour, until a drunk stumbled up the stairway and fell into a seat. Then he raised his head, and said in a slurred voice to the rest of us:"Don't worry, the pilot will be along in a minute. I've been with him all night."It was one of the longest flights of my life. On the ground in Bogota, I found out it was a joke.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 15, 1994
MOSCOW -- Russian aviation boasts some of the world's smallest airlines, dirtiest planes, best pilots, worst weather conditions, remotest airports, most confusing bureaucracy, and best-trained but overstretched safety inspectors.Added up, it means that Russia meets international safety standards -- but barely -- according to a joint U.S.-Russian air safety report released yesterday.It means that flying in Russia is not quite so dangerous as some organizations, such as the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, had suggested.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 24, 1994
MOSCOW -- Emergency workers fought their way through 9 feet of snow yesterday to the Siberian crash site of an Aeroflot plane bound for Hong Kong, while in Moscow the disaster underscored already urgent questions about the airline's reliability.All 75 people aboard the 183-seat Airbus A-310 jetliner were killed.Air traffic controllers in Novokuznetsk said the plane vanished suddenly from their radar screens early Wednesday morning. There was no distress signal, and several experts here said that that strongly suggests a midair explosion.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 13, 1991
MOSCOW -- Across the country, travelers arrived at airports yesterday, only to find that no planes would be flying anywhere.One-third of the country's 350 airports were closed, and dozens more were expected to follow suit at any time, according to officials at the Soviet Civil Aviation Ministry.It may be the hallmark of the tumultuous situation -- political triumphs are quickly overshadowed by economic disasters.The announcement of Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's success in forging a Commonwealth of Independent States was followed within minutes by a report from the Tass news agency that 92 airports had stopped operating for lack of fuel and that 38 more were using up their last gallons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By HARTFORD COURANT | February 8, 2004
Flying is fraught with so many uncertainties these days: Will my flight be canceled by a terror threat? Did I forget to take the nail file out of my purse? Did that other passenger just walk off with my shoes? At least now you can be certain of one thing: what the food might look like on your next flight (assuming you're lucky enough to get any). A Web site, airlinemeals .net, posts photographs taken by passengers in flight, along with their ratings and comments. More than 300 airlines are represented, from Aeroflot to Yangon Airways.
NEWS
By Joseph Albright and Joseph Albright,Cox News Service | January 2, 1992
MOSCOW -- Aeroflot more than tripled its airline fares yesterday, and Moscow supermarket workers were ordered to work late into the evening to triple and quadruple the prices on food shelves before the stores open today.Ordinary people waited like patients in a dentist's chair with no painkiller. Today will bring them the heaviest jolt of Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's historic experiment of extracting communism and replacing it with a profit-driven economy."Who invaded us and made up these prices?"
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.