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NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 2000
THE 17 CHILDREN inside Runnymede Elementary School's gym look like they are auditioning for a Britney Spears music video. Hands fly through the air in unison, while feet and legs keep the beat. But this is not a rehearsal for a music video, it's Heartlight Aerobics, an after-school exercise program for children. "This is about getting kids energized and making them understand that exercise is fun," explained Lisa Click, the aerobics instructor leading the program, sponsored by the nonprofit group California School of Fitness.
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NEWS
October 23, 2013
Last week's Columbia Flier article pointed out accurately how active our today's seniors are, and the growing need for programs that address their needs. More and more seniors are turning to swimming and water aerobics as an ideal form of exercise for aging muscles and bones. In contrast, the Columbia Association staff apparently doesn't understand this need, as it conspicuously failed to include in its proposed 2015-6 budget any funding for an additional indoor pool. This was odd, given that CA spent over a year and thousands of hours and dollars to create an Aquatics Master Plan recommending just that.
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NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | March 30, 2003
I've heard a lot of buzz about something called striptease aerobics. I know the classes are really popular in Los Angeles and New York. Are they offered in Baltimore or Washington? This fusion of striptease and aerobics is known as Cardio Striptease. Launched by the upscale Crunch Health Club in Los Angeles in 2001, this high-energy, low-impact workout is now making a splash nationwide. One Crunch insider tells us the classes are hotter than they've ever been. The class itself combines risque striptease techniques with classic aerobic moves.
HEALTH
By Zach Sparks and For The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
Inez Watson is a two-time breast cancer survivor and grandmother of 13 children. She says her resolve stems from her faith, which she shares with her Praisercise workout class every Monday from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Calvary Baptist Church in Baltimore. The group does yoga stretches, aerobics, mat- and chair-based Pilates, and hand-weights training, all to praise music. The exercises improve body mobility, cognitive skills and overall health, Watson says. "Each initiative gives the body a different measure of strength," said Watson, a former administrator in the medical field.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 28, 1995
Among the many attributes of Center Stage's one-woman show series, "Feminine Singular: Women Speak Solo," one of the most laudable has been the diversity of the offerings. Rhodessa Jones' "Big Butt Girls, Hard-Headed Women," the last and most unusual show in the series, is diverse in its own right.Based on Jones' experiences teaching aerobics to women in San Francisco's City Jail in 1987, the show boldly crisscrosses genres and performance styles. In the course of 75 minutes without intermission, Jones sings, dances, engages in direct address, leads the audience in aerobic hand exercises, reads a letter from her incarcerated nephew and, in more traditional theatrical style, depicts several characters, including herself.
NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 29, 2000
WHAT BEGINS AS an opportunity to exercise for many area women often turns into something much more. Led by a devoted and spirited group of volunteer instructors, women of all ages faithfully attend Body and Spirit Aerobics classes at Calvary United Methodist Church. Self-described as a "a great workout to contemporary Christian music," the group has grown tremendously from its humble beginnings 12 years ago. Initially organized by a stay-at-home mom as Christian aerobics, the class was held two mornings a week in the church's basement.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | January 19, 1993
The congregation at St. Stephen Reformed Episcopal Churc is twisting and shouting while praising the Lord.Men and women at the Eldersburg church are stepping lively into morning or evening classes organized by Praise Aerobics Inc., a ministry that combines Christian music and heart-healthy exercise.The nonprofit outreach ministry, open to all faiths, began nine years ago at Bishop Cummins Reformed Episcopal Church in Baltimore County. It stresses exercise to strengthen the cardiovascular system and prayer to bolster participants' spiritual lives.
NEWS
June 19, 2003
An interview with Carol Lorton, a member of the Aerobic Book Club. What is the Aerobic Book Club? It came out of a Howard County Parks and Recreation Cardio-Crunch class. The instructor and several class members wanted another reason to get together outside of class, and the book club was born. Just out of that class, we have about a dozen people who have a good reason to get together to have lunch - a book is a good reason. Are you still doing aerobics together? Oh, yes, we like to work out, read and eat. We rotate book club lunch at each other's houses and try to fashion the food according to the book.
SPORTS
By Bill Free | January 17, 1992
The word is out on Iain Fraser.The Baltimore Blast defender has turned the Major Soccer League around during the past 10 games because of a strict aerobic fitness program that is being directed by his wife, Denise.It took a little prodding yesterday before Fraser would talk about the aerobics program, but he admitted: "It has made me stronger for the fourth quarter."Fraser has blocked 29 shots in the past 10 games (most in the MSL during that span), and he has contributed three goals and five assists.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1998
You can be a lady and still kick butt -- just ask Jessicah Hackney.She's not a woman to confront in a dark alley. After just six weeks in a Pasadena cardio-kickboxing class, she's learned to punch and kick with enough enthusiasm and strength to push a bag across the room."
HEALTH
By Zach Sparks, For The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Seniors are moving to the lyrics, "Friday night I crashed your party, Saturday I said I'm sorry" from Billy Joel's "You May Be Right. With a song list that includes "Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini," the Greater Baltimore Medical Center-sponsored Fit for Life program prides itself on exercising and having fun. "The class is a social outlet," said Sally Ransom Knecht, a group coordinator. "Our purpose is getting fit but also developing relationships and caring for one another.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
Open house Chapelgate Preschool holds an open house highlighting the programs for 2-, 3- and 4-year-olds beginning at 10 a.m. Monday, March 18, at 2600 Marriottsville Road in Marriottsville. Information: 410-442-5663. Celtic concert The Mighty Kelltones perform the group's annual Celtic Show at noon Friday, March 22, at the Gary J. Arthur Community Center, 2400 Route 97 in Glenwood. Admission is free. Information: 410-313-4840. Easter program A children's program beginning at 9 a.m. Saturday, March 23, at Christ Lutheran Church, 12570 Route 108 in Clarksville, will use storytelling, games, crafts and songs to tell the story of Jesus' resurrection and to help children understand what makes Easter Sunday so special.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
In a cheery room in Cockeysville, two dozen people sit with their heads down, focused on the papers in front of them. The only sound is the scratching of pencils on paper. The sight triggers memories of school days, but this is no group of middle schoolers eking their way through a math class pop quiz. It's the Brain Aerobics class at Broadmead Senior Living Community. Once a week, speech pathologist Chuck Warnke leads the class through a variety of mental activities, including riddles, word games and history puzzles - one activity challenged class members to remember the prices of products, from a gallon of milk to a pair of women's leather boots, from 1972.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne | September 5, 1991
When it comes to physical fitness, except for walking to the refrigerator during commercials, the biggest workout some of us get is pushing buttons on the TV remote control. (And we females know who gets most of that exercise).But the county Recreation and Parks Department has decided to help get us off our buns with a collection of innovative programs to promote healthy lifestyles for Severna Park residents of all ages.Heartlight Aerobics is for children in grades 2 to 5. Kids have afun workout while dancing to the latest hits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
Callowhill pool's aqua-aerobics class sounds a lot like a nightclub. Dance music with a heavy beat blares from a mediocre sound system and reverberates through the room. Women, and a few men, groove to the music. "One, two, three, four ... turn it," shouts instructor and facility director Richard Gray. But the "dancers" are submerged in almost 4 feet of water. They jog in place, they pump their arms in the air. However, their heads - many covered with shower caps and swim caps - stay dry. The workout isn't always set to a nightclub soundtrack.
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