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Aerobic Exercise

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By MARY B. BRECKENRIDGE and MARY B. BRECKENRIDGE,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 24, 2006
Fitness can be as close as your own backyard. Who needs gym memberships and Bowflex machines when you have a yard to take care of? Lawn and garden work -- activities such a digging, planting and mowing -- can work the heart and other muscles just as effectively as more traditional forms of aerobic exercise, say members of the University of Akron's sport-science and wellness-education department. In some cases, yardwork is even more effective, said Ronald Otterstetter, an assistant professor who specializes in exercise physiology.
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By MARY B. BRECKENRIDGE and MARY B. BRECKENRIDGE,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 24, 2006
Fitness can be as close as your own backyard. Who needs gym memberships and Bowflex machines when you have a yard to take care of? Lawn and garden work -- activities such a digging, planting and mowing -- can work the heart and other muscles just as effectively as more traditional forms of aerobic exercise, say members of the University of Akron's sport-science and wellness-education department. In some cases, yardwork is even more effective, said Ronald Otterstetter, an assistant professor who specializes in exercise physiology.
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NEWS
January 21, 2005
I suffer from mild anxiety, but after a vigorous physical workout, I'm calm, relaxed and totally balanced. Why? Vigorous exercise is believed to trigger a surge in natural brain chemicals, including endorphins, the body's own painkillers. It also boosts serotonin, a brain chemical that can be low in some people with anxiety and depression. "Exercise can be an appropriate add-on treatment for a lot of anxiety disorders," said Roger A. Fielding, director of the nutrition and exercise physiology laboratory at Tufts University.
NEWS
January 21, 2005
I suffer from mild anxiety, but after a vigorous physical workout, I'm calm, relaxed and totally balanced. Why? Vigorous exercise is believed to trigger a surge in natural brain chemicals, including endorphins, the body's own painkillers. It also boosts serotonin, a brain chemical that can be low in some people with anxiety and depression. "Exercise can be an appropriate add-on treatment for a lot of anxiety disorders," said Roger A. Fielding, director of the nutrition and exercise physiology laboratory at Tufts University.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | March 26, 1991
Gail Williams-Glasser used to cope with stress by smoking; when she stopped smoking 10 years ago, she stumbled onto a different kind of relief:"I'd get up and leave the room," she says. "I would go and walk up and down the steps."From indoor steps she moved to outdoor walks, and then began to jog, gradually extending her distance to 16 miles.In the process, she became an oddity -- an ex-smoker who did not gain weight.According to a recent report in the New England Journal of Medicine, that's unusual.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | November 12, 1991
In an exercise studio in the Medical Park of the Anne Arundel Medical Center, the senior fitness buffs step to the beat of the big bands of the '40s, and the Top 40s of the '90s. The music may be manic or mellow, but, "We don't do it like Jane Fonda," says fitness instructor Margaret Lynch. "We're very careful; there's no bouncing, and we make sure they don't overwork."In fact, the routines are screened by physical therapists, she says. But although it's a low-impact, no-pain, no-strain class, it's still aerobic exercise, with the sustained, rhythmic movement that strengthens the cardiovascular system, burns calories, and keeps the body mobile.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | November 19, 1991
Your blood pressure has two components: the systolic pressure, which is the pressure in your blood vessels when your heart contracts, and the diastolic pressure, which is the pressure in your vessels when your heart relaxes. If these numbers are 120 and 80, respectively, your blood pressure would be expressed as "120/80 millimeters of mercury" -- perfectly normal blood pressure.But what happens to that reading during exercise?During aerobic exercises (jogging, dancing, swimming or cycling)
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | September 23, 1991
Harold Chopping, who hopes to represent Canada at the Olympics in Barcelona next year, beat out the American woman rider D.D. Alexander yesterday and won the Columbia Classic Grand Prix.Chopping and his mount, the 12-year-old Hanoverian stallion, Aerobic, turned in the only faultless performance in the 30-horse field at the $25,000 show jumping event, held on the campus of Howard Community College in Columbia.Alexander, fresh from a bronze medal with the U.S. Equestrian Team at the Pan-American Games in Havana, raced against the clock to try to beat Chopping in the timed jump-off.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer/United Feature Syndicate | January 26, 1993
The ideal exercise program for most people includes combining two types of exercise. The first is aerobic -- running, fast walking, dancing or cycling -- to make your heart more fit. The second is strength training -- lifting free weights or pushing on strength-training machines -- to make your skeletal muscles stronger.If you lift weights competitively, you need to focus on lifting weights.Extensive aerobic exercise may keep you from achieving your maximum gain in strength.You cannot train for heart fitness and skeletal muscle strength at the same time.
FEATURES
By Arnold Schechter | October 23, 1990
Leonard Schwartz is a pension-age Popeye. At 65, his small body is knotted with oversized muscles. He boasts about how he can walk briskly for two and a half hours while swinging 6-pound weights overhead.Formerly a psychiatrist in Pittsburgh, Schwartz built his body and his fortune with Heavyhands, an exercise system he introduced in 1982. Heavyhands added the vigorous lifting of hand weights to activities like walking and aerobics.Heavyhands weights soon had to compete with other hand weights, as well as weights for the ankles, wrists, waist and torso.
NEWS
June 19, 2003
An interview with Carol Lorton, a member of the Aerobic Book Club. What is the Aerobic Book Club? It came out of a Howard County Parks and Recreation Cardio-Crunch class. The instructor and several class members wanted another reason to get together outside of class, and the book club was born. Just out of that class, we have about a dozen people who have a good reason to get together to have lunch - a book is a good reason. Are you still doing aerobics together? Oh, yes, we like to work out, read and eat. We rotate book club lunch at each other's houses and try to fashion the food according to the book.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer/United Feature Syndicate | January 26, 1993
The ideal exercise program for most people includes combining two types of exercise. The first is aerobic -- running, fast walking, dancing or cycling -- to make your heart more fit. The second is strength training -- lifting free weights or pushing on strength-training machines -- to make your skeletal muscles stronger.If you lift weights competitively, you need to focus on lifting weights.Extensive aerobic exercise may keep you from achieving your maximum gain in strength.You cannot train for heart fitness and skeletal muscle strength at the same time.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | November 19, 1991
Your blood pressure has two components: the systolic pressure, which is the pressure in your blood vessels when your heart contracts, and the diastolic pressure, which is the pressure in your vessels when your heart relaxes. If these numbers are 120 and 80, respectively, your blood pressure would be expressed as "120/80 millimeters of mercury" -- perfectly normal blood pressure.But what happens to that reading during exercise?During aerobic exercises (jogging, dancing, swimming or cycling)
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | November 12, 1991
In an exercise studio in the Medical Park of the Anne Arundel Medical Center, the senior fitness buffs step to the beat of the big bands of the '40s, and the Top 40s of the '90s. The music may be manic or mellow, but, "We don't do it like Jane Fonda," says fitness instructor Margaret Lynch. "We're very careful; there's no bouncing, and we make sure they don't overwork."In fact, the routines are screened by physical therapists, she says. But although it's a low-impact, no-pain, no-strain class, it's still aerobic exercise, with the sustained, rhythmic movement that strengthens the cardiovascular system, burns calories, and keeps the body mobile.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | September 23, 1991
Harold Chopping, who hopes to represent Canada at the Olympics in Barcelona next year, beat out the American woman rider D.D. Alexander yesterday and won the Columbia Classic Grand Prix.Chopping and his mount, the 12-year-old Hanoverian stallion, Aerobic, turned in the only faultless performance in the 30-horse field at the $25,000 show jumping event, held on the campus of Howard Community College in Columbia.Alexander, fresh from a bronze medal with the U.S. Equestrian Team at the Pan-American Games in Havana, raced against the clock to try to beat Chopping in the timed jump-off.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | March 26, 1991
Gail Williams-Glasser used to cope with stress by smoking; when she stopped smoking 10 years ago, she stumbled onto a different kind of relief:"I'd get up and leave the room," she says. "I would go and walk up and down the steps."From indoor steps she moved to outdoor walks, and then began to jog, gradually extending her distance to 16 miles.In the process, she became an oddity -- an ex-smoker who did not gain weight.According to a recent report in the New England Journal of Medicine, that's unusual.
NEWS
June 19, 2003
An interview with Carol Lorton, a member of the Aerobic Book Club. What is the Aerobic Book Club? It came out of a Howard County Parks and Recreation Cardio-Crunch class. The instructor and several class members wanted another reason to get together outside of class, and the book club was born. Just out of that class, we have about a dozen people who have a good reason to get together to have lunch - a book is a good reason. Are you still doing aerobics together? Oh, yes, we like to work out, read and eat. We rotate book club lunch at each other's houses and try to fashion the food according to the book.
NEWS
By Edward M. Eveld and By Edward M. Eveld,Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 5, 1999
First came Tae-Bo. Now Tae-Bo injuries.The Tae-Bo fitness craze, with its rhythmic kicking and punching, added a new spark to aerobic exercise routines. For some, though, Tae-Bo also is offering new ways to get injured.Some Tae-Bo exercisers, energized at first by the martial arts-like movements, are turning up with muscle strains, painful hips and lower backs, even injured knees and elbows.Cindy Morgan, who lives in a Kansas City suburb, tried an exercise videotape by Tae-Bo pro Billy Blanks.
FEATURES
By Arnold Schechter | October 23, 1990
Leonard Schwartz is a pension-age Popeye. At 65, his small body is knotted with oversized muscles. He boasts about how he can walk briskly for two and a half hours while swinging 6-pound weights overhead.Formerly a psychiatrist in Pittsburgh, Schwartz built his body and his fortune with Heavyhands, an exercise system he introduced in 1982. Heavyhands added the vigorous lifting of hand weights to activities like walking and aerobics.Heavyhands weights soon had to compete with other hand weights, as well as weights for the ankles, wrists, waist and torso.
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