Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAerial
IN THE NEWS

Aerial

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Given the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, there's an extra haunting quality to "Air Heart," an inventive and absorbing aerial stage work about aviator Amelia Earhart currently at Baltimore Theatre Project. Written and performed by Mara Neimanis, the one-hour piece addresses the joy of flight, the curse of celebrity, and much more as it seeks to impart a sense of who Earhart was and what she wanted to be. Neimanis has cleverly mixed fact and fiction to create a script that rings true, right down to some made-up letters from Earhart to Eleanor Roosevelt, and she delivers the text with a good deal of nuance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Date: Aug. 2 Her story: Catherine "Cat" Yard, 25, grew up in Ewing, N.J. She is an artist and regularly models for figure drawing and painting classes at Maryland Institute College of Art , the Johns Hopkins University, Towson University and the Mitchell School of Fine Arts in Baltimore. She and her husband are ensemble cast members performing with the Baltimore Rock Opera Society in "The Electric Pharaoh," which opens Oct. 17. Her parents, Kathleen and Duane Yard, live in Ewing.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 17, 1997
An aerial photography company is scheduled to photograph sections of Taneytown as soon as snow melts enough to provide clear visibility.Consulting engineers need the photos to pinpoint wetlands and other features that could be affected by Taneytown's plans to improve and expand its sewage treatment plant, City Manager Charles "Chip" Boyles said.The City Council authorized $11,800 for aerial photos of the treatment plant area at its Feb. 10 meeting.Boyles said engineers can use the photos for topographic information, making the aerial survey less expensive than a ground-level survey.
NEWS
Krishana Davis and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Even for the most avid yogi, doing a handstand or crow pose is inherently different when you are hanging more than a foot above the floor from a series of fabric slings. As the yoga craze has taken off across the U.S., quirky, modified classes such as hot yoga - practicing in a room heated to 95 degrees - or even naked yoga have gained cult-like followings. But a small aerial yoga class at The Arena Club in Bel Air might have them all beat with muscle lengthening, strength training and just plain fun. “It brings freedom back into the body,” aerial yoga instructor Kim DeAngelis says after a recent class.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 5, 2002
Rush-hour commuters were treated to an unusual display of aerial activity yesterday at Penn Station, where travelers reported seeing two roaring Black Hawk helicopters follow a high-speed Acela Express train. The aerial convoy was sighted about 4:30 p.m. and was part of a military exercise, said Amtrak spokesman Dan Stessel. He would not provide details about it but said Amtrak periodically conducts drills with law enforcement agencies. Maryland National Guard spokesman Maj. Charles Kohler, whose office is near Penn Station, said the helicopters were UH-60 Black Hawk aircraft.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
Twelve-foot letters "VLT" will begin appearing around Carroll this week -- signifying not an alien invasion, but an aerial-mapping project to take the county's 911 emergency response system into the future.About 60 of the white vinyl panels will be placed to cover survey control points for the aerial photography, said Buddy Redman, the county's administrator of the Office of Public Safety. The survey control points are used to tie the mapping to the surface of the earth.The project should be completed in about a year, he said, and the result will look like a road map.The aerial photographs will be used to create accurate maps -- improving the county's computer-assisted dispatch system with a display on the computer screen showing the exact location of an emergency call, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 8, 2009
Baltimore's first-ever Aerial Festival will take place this weekend somewhere in the visually sumptuous, surreal intersection between a three-ring circus and high art. Picture this: an alley in the Station North district in which the walls are spray-painted from pavement to rooftop in graffiti, each design more elaborate than the next. It's shortly after sunset, and strings of flickering Italian lights throw patches of dark and light on those colorful walls. On the ground, two performers on a spinning teeter-totter form a moving sculpture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Claire Wang and Claire Wang,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2005
Have you ever wanted to fly? You might get some semblance of that feeling of freedom watching Air Dance Bernasconi, a Baltimore-based aerial dance company that is presenting three performances of "Aerial Illusions" tomorrow through Sunday at Towson University. With its roots in gymnastics, modern dance and circus performance, much of what is accomplished in aerial dance is made possible using apparatuses such as the lower trapeze. Differing from a circus trapeze, which is rigged from two points high in the air and swings back and forth, the lower trapeze hangs approximately 4 feet from the ground with both lines attached to one point.
FEATURES
By DEBORAH BACH and DEBORAH BACH,CONTRIBUTING WRITERS | May 29, 2000
Jen Pastor just wouldn't learn. She swung from the top of her canopy bed, from bathroom towel bars that came crashing down, from monkey bars she fell from, leaving a small round scar on her forehead. "I hurt myself pretty bad," Pastor says, laughing. Undeterred, Pastor wanted to join the circus but instead went to college to study psychology. But tonight, the 21-year-old is back on the bar, this time with some professional guidance. At Gerstung Inter-Sport school in Mount Washington, Pastor swings on a trapeze, smiling contentedly.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 3, 1996
A story in the March 3 Howard County edition of The Sun incorrectly named the founders of Columbia Aerial Photography. The company was co-founded by Patrick R. Carletto and LaVega "Bic" Green. Mr. Carletto since has left the company and has founded Carletto Aerial Photography in Ellicott City.A picture is worth a thousand words -- and up to $100 to LaVega "Bic" Green, owner of Columbia Aerial Photography, who plies the skies with a miniature, camera-equipped, remote-controlled helicopter that he built from a kit.His aerial photograph of snow-covered Columbia Town Center, taken during the January blizzard when larger aircraft were grounded, proves that bigger isn't necessarily better, he says.
NEWS
By John Houser III, For The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
The 7th annual OC Air Show finished its first day to the applause and cheering of the thousands who showed up to watch the aerial acrobatics up close. They were not disappointed. The air show is a weekend long celebration of aeronautic precision and death-defying flight maneuvers that are proof of the expertise and dedication of the pilots involved. From a head-to-head stunt performance by Gary Ward and Greg Connell to the air ballet that is the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, there was more than enough excitement to go around.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Given the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, there's an extra haunting quality to "Air Heart," an inventive and absorbing aerial stage work about aviator Amelia Earhart currently at Baltimore Theatre Project. Written and performed by Mara Neimanis, the one-hour piece addresses the joy of flight, the curse of celebrity, and much more as it seeks to impart a sense of who Earhart was and what she wanted to be. Neimanis has cleverly mixed fact and fiction to create a script that rings true, right down to some made-up letters from Earhart to Eleanor Roosevelt, and she delivers the text with a good deal of nuance.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Buddy Green, the defensive coordinator for Navy's football team, has a steadfast policy of refraining from publicly assessing any unit of the defense until season's end. "Ask me on Dec. 31," he said when approached about the development of the pass defense. Junior free safety Parrish Gaines, however, does not share his coach's reservations. "We're getting better week by week," said Gaines, who shifted from cornerback in the team's victory over Pittsburgh on Oct. 26. "We still have guys in new positions.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Though it has only been gone a few weeks, the Navy blimp will once again make its return to the Baltimore skies. The 178-foot airship, which is owned by the government and primarily used for research, will continue a mission to test aerial mapping sensors for the Army starting Nov. 12. The trek will begin in Beltsville and later continue to the Baltimore region, although a spokesman for the Naval Research Laboratory couldn't say exactly when the...
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
A 178-foot blimp that some residents have spotted above the Baltimore region in recent days is a manned, government research airship conducting aerial mapping, according to the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. The MZ-3A "lighter-than-air" blimp began roaming above the greater Washington, D.C. area on Sept. 21, and will be operating in the region through Oct. 5, according to the laboratory. It is stationed at the Naval Air Station in Patuxent River. The propeller-driven blimp, which can remain "aloft and nearly stationary" for more than 12 hours, is government owned.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | December 24, 2012
The New York Giants' secondary has been plagued by injuries that have sapped the unit of strong safety Kenny Phillips and cornerback Prince Amukamara for extended periods. But the secondary has been anchored by cornerback Corey Webster (the team leader in pass breakups with nine) and strong safety Stevie Brown (the team leader in interceptions with seven). However, the Ravens appeared to attack the Giants' defensive backfield by exposing Webster on Sunday. When New York went into single coverage, quarterback Joe Flacco usually went after Webster, completing five passes for 88 yards and a 6-yard touchdown to Torrey Smith, two for 45 yards to Anquan Boldin, one for 36 yards to Dennis Pitta, and one for 7 yards to Jacoby Jones.
FEATURES
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | December 8, 2005
In the drafty expanse of a former city substation, Tim Scofield and Mara Neimanis perform an aerial pas de deux that has the playful, fluid feel of a romp on the moon. Harnessed by cables between steel yokes, Scofield, a solidly built sculptor, and Neimanis, a wiry aerialist, use their heft against that of a hinged counterweight shaped like a wedge of pizza. The two leap 15 feet in the air, turn somersaults, crook their legs and make like Peter Pan as they swivel aloft for yards and yards.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2004
The aerial snapshot of Steve Ford's Eastern Avenue rowhouse appears a bit blurry from an altitude of about 2,500 feet. But the rooftop deck perched atop his house facing Patterson Park is clearly visible. Ford was surprised to learn that the bird's-eye digital image of his rooftop is readily accessible on a city government laptop. But new technology purchased by the city gives local officials the ability to view all sides of Ford's house - and of every building in Baltimore. As the city's Web site explains: "Over 20,000 images of Baltimore are available," allowing city officials to "literally view, measure, and analyze any property, intersection, tree or other feature in the city."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
During the Patterson Park pagoda's 120 years of existence, it has been photographed, painted and otherwise rendered too many times to count. But never in all that time did anyone depict the landmark the way Terry and Belinda Kilby just did. No one zoomed in close enough to count each roof tile. No one let you see right over the balcony rail and onto each of the three decks. No one swooped in like a pigeon would, coming in beak-level with the weather vane to take in the observatory's 60-foot span and the city's northeastern neighborhoods stretching behind it. The Kilbys did it with their feet planted in the park grass - but with their camera soaring through the air, attached to a drone.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
A pilot working for an Eastern Shore company that flies advertising banners over Ocean City beaches each summer was killed Thursday after his plane crashed on a golf course in Worcester County, according to Maryland State Police. The pilot, identified by police as Garett Colona, 23, of the 5000 block of Sharptown Road in Rhodesdale, was a "super guy" beloved by all the company's other pilots, said Bob Bunting, owner of plane operator Ocean Aerial Ads Thursday afternoon. "This was one of the nicest individuals I've ever known in my life," Bunting said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.