Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAer Lingus
IN THE NEWS

Aer Lingus

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2000
Buoyed by its early success, Irish air carrier Aer Lingus said yesterday that it will increase service to Baltimore-Washington International Airport at a faster pace than originally anticipated, giving state transportation officials a boost in their bid to attract more international passengers to the city. The government-owned airline began service to BWI on Sept. 6, offering three flights per week to two airports in Ireland - Shannon Airport and Dublin Airport. That will increase to five flights per week beginning in April, followed by daily flights by May 29. That puts the airline slightly ahead of its original plans and makes Baltimore one of its fastest launches in North America.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 27, 2008
There are so many opportunities for BWI airport to start offering a half-decent menu of international routes - and so many reasons that little may come of them. The biggest opportunity begins next month. Starting March 28, the Open Skies Agreement lets airlines fly to the United States from any European airport and allows U.S. carriers to land anywhere in the European Union. The deal scraps decades of red tape and exponentially multiplies the trans-Atlantic options of airports. No airport seems better poised to benefit than Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall, which is No. 1 in my unscientific ranking of great airports with underused international terminals that are near jillions of people who want to use them.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2001
In the first tangible effect of the airline industry's financial woes to hit Maryland, Aer Lingus has cut all service to Baltimore-Washington International Airport - barely a year after launching its inaugural flight. The Irish air carrier was already suffering from heavy financial losses, fewer passengers and a leadership vacuum, and last week's terrorist attacks worsened its economic problems, officials said yesterday. The crisis led the company to announce Monday that it will cut up to 1,500 jobs and a quarter of its operations, including the termination of its daily flights out of BWI. Aer Lingus also will cut service to Newark, N.J., and Stockholm, Sweden, and reduce service on other European routes.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2005
When Aer Lingus Group PLC, the Irish national airline, announced last year that it would leave Baltimore-Washington International Airport on Dec. 1, the 2,100 passengers that already had booked flights to Shannon and Dublin for the holidays were suddenly stranded. But when airline managers discovered there were few easy alternatives on the busiest days around Christmas, they ordered four planes and crews back to BWI to deliver a little over half of the passengers overseas. For the rest, they offered to buy connecting tickets on other airlines.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2000
The Irish airline Aer Lingus received preliminary federal approval yesterday for round-trip flights between Baltimore and Ireland, bolstering the international passenger service that Maryland transportation officials have struggled to improve the past three years. The U.S. Department of Transportation granted Ireland's national airline authority to fly between Baltimore-Washington International Airport and two airports in Ireland - Dublin Airport and Shannon Airport near Limerick. Approval of the routes is subject to a 10-day review and comment period, but state officials say privately that they consider the review a formality.
NEWS
July 18, 2000
YESTERDAY'S welcoming ceremony for Aer Lingus at Baltimore-Washington International Airport comes six weeks too soon: Its thrice-weekly flights to Shannon and Dublin don't begin until early September. But premature popping of the champagne corks is understandable, given the importance of these new flights to BWI. Added to the launch earlier this month of twice-weekly flights to Accra by Ghana Airways, the Aer Lingus takeoffs give BWI's international pier some much-needed new destinations.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
Aer Lingus, the Irish national airline, said yesterday that efforts to preserve its once-daily flight from Baltimore-Washington International Airport to Shannon have failed, and it will abandon the route. The airline, which came to BWI in 2000, has been transforming itself into one of the first low-cost transoceanic airlines in the past two years. BWI, Aer Lingus officials said, no longer fits into its business model, which requires frequent and full flights. The airline now has one inbound flight and one outbound flight on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2000
Baltimore-Washington International Airport is so busy these days that the state of Maryland will spend more than $1.3 billion over the next five to seven years just to alleviate growing congestion. That won't stop Gov. Parris N. Glendening, Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley and a large contingent of Baltimore business officials from blanketing Ireland this week in an all-out campaign to ensure that Aer Lingus' new service to BWI succeeds in bringing more passengers to the state. The reason lies partly in one of the European Union's fastest-growing economies.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2002
With its financial recovery ahead of schedule, Irish airline Aer Lingus said yesterday that it is planning to resume flights between Baltimore-Washington International Airport and two airports in Ireland next spring. The Irish national carrier ended service to BWI in November after the terrorist attacks exacerbated its financial crisis. The departure came about a year after the airline had launched service to BWI, quickly becoming the airport's biggest international carrier. The airline's departure and a sluggish economy have hurt BWI's meager international operations.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2004
As the Irish national airline Aer Lingus remakes itself into an Atlantic-hopping low-cost carrier, the company says Baltimore may no longer fit into its model and it may leave the airport for good. The airline already has decided to suspend its once-daily flight from Baltimore-Washington International Airport during the winter months. In another blow to the airport's struggle for international service, Aer Lingus will decide during the next few weeks if it will return in the spring, Jack Foley, the airline's executive vice president for North American operations, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
Aer Lingus, the Irish national airline, said yesterday that efforts to preserve its once-daily flight from Baltimore-Washington International Airport to Shannon have failed, and it will abandon the route. The airline, which came to BWI in 2000, has been transforming itself into one of the first low-cost transoceanic airlines in the past two years. BWI, Aer Lingus officials said, no longer fits into its business model, which requires frequent and full flights. The airline now has one inbound flight and one outbound flight on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2004
As the Irish national airline Aer Lingus remakes itself into an Atlantic-hopping low-cost carrier, the company says Baltimore may no longer fit into its model and it may leave the airport for good. The airline already has decided to suspend its once-daily flight from Baltimore-Washington International Airport during the winter months. In another blow to the airport's struggle for international service, Aer Lingus will decide during the next few weeks if it will return in the spring, Jack Foley, the airline's executive vice president for North American operations, said yesterday.
NEWS
March 24, 2003
Using BWI? Plan ahead and arrive early Officials at Baltimore-Washington International Airport are advising travelers to plan ahead when traveling. Travelers should contact their airlines to check on the status of flights or to change plans before arriving at the airport. Passengers should check in 90 minutes before domestic flights and two hours before international flights. Travelers should be aware of the increased police presence, police-dog patrols and vehicle inspections. They should also remember to avoid leaving luggage and bags unattended in the airport terminal.
NEWS
November 11, 2002
Aer Lingus to offer BWI-to-Ireland service Aer Lingus, the national airline of Ireland, will reintroduce direct service between Baltimore-Washington International Airport and Ireland. Aer Lingus also offers flights from New York, Boston, Chicago and Los Angeles. Aer Lingus will commence direct service to Shannon, Ireland, with continuing service to Dublin on March 30. The route will operate daily except Tuesdays and Saturdays. SCORE workshops offered for small-business owners Service Corps of Retired Executives has scheduled three small-business workshops to be offered at the YWCA, 1517 Ritchie Highway in Arnold.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2002
Baltimore-Washington International Airport celebrated the return of a key overseas carrier last week, but aviation experts said a weak economy and structural changes in the industry will continue to hamper the state's long-term efforts to link the airport with new overseas destinations. In August, BWI's international pier handled 22 percent fewer passengers than it did a year ago, just before Irish national carrier Aer Lingus temporarily suspended its service to BWI to cut costs. That's roughly twice the decline in domestic travel, which also has suffered in the wake of the terrorist attacks last year.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2002
With its financial recovery ahead of schedule, Irish airline Aer Lingus said yesterday that it is planning to resume flights between Baltimore-Washington International Airport and two airports in Ireland next spring. The Irish national carrier ended service to BWI in November after the terrorist attacks exacerbated its financial crisis. The departure came about a year after the airline had launched service to BWI, quickly becoming the airport's biggest international carrier. The airline's departure and a sluggish economy have hurt BWI's meager international operations.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2000
Giving a potential boost to what has been a weak link in Maryland's transportation network, the Irish airline Aer Lingus is seeking approval for a new international passenger service between Baltimore-Washington International Airport and Ireland. Aer Lingus, Ireland's state-owned airline, wants to fly regular service between BWI and two stops in Ireland -- Shannon Airport and Dublin Airport. The airline and state officials filed a request Tuesday with the U.S. Department of Transportation seeking authorization for the new routes.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2002
Baltimore-Washington International Airport celebrated the return of a key overseas carrier last week, but aviation experts said a weak economy and structural changes in the industry will continue to hamper the state's long-term efforts to link the airport with new overseas destinations. In August, BWI's international pier handled 22 percent fewer passengers than it did a year ago, just before Irish national carrier Aer Lingus temporarily suspended its service to BWI to cut costs. That's roughly twice the decline in domestic travel, which also has suffered in the wake of the terrorist attacks last year.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.