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By Liz Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2010
The Office of the People's Counsel has recently revamped its website to help Marylanders keep track of upcoming hearings of the state's top utility regulator. The People's Counsel represents consumer interests in utility matters at hearings before the Maryland Public Service Commission and the Maryland General Assembly. The redesigned site, at http://www.opc.state.md.us , also offers tips for consumers with brochures about shopping for an electricity supplier, getting help paying utility bills and more.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
Ann Porter Lundy, a former president of the Maryland Orchid Society and founder of Baltimore's chapter of the Maryland Native Plant Society, died Sept. 28 of cancer at Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore. She was 70. "She taught a lot of people about gardens, plants and life," said her husband, A. Lee Lundy Jr., a partner at the law firm of Tydings & Rosenberg LLP. "She meant a lot to a lot of people. " Ann Lundy was born March 25, 1944, in Palm Beach, Fla., in the Breakers Hotel, which was then being used as a troop and maternity hospital.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
Bernard R. Rynarzewski, a retired state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene worker who was proud of his Polish heritage, died July 9 of complications from a stroke at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 60. The son of a civil engineer and a homemaker, Bernard Ronald Rynarzewski was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. He was a 1970 graduate of Towson High School and earned his college degree from the University of Baltimore. From 1974 to 1998, he worked as a facilities surveyor for the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, where he frequently became an advocate for residents of health care facilities who were unable to do so for themselves.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
A limit should be set on the time it takes to clear or dismiss a teacher accused of misconduct so that employees do not remain out of their schools for months and even years, legislators and education advocates said this week. While two legislators suggested action by the General Assembly, an education advocate said some agreement could be reached between unions and school systems on how to expedite a process that is expensive to taxpayers and detrimental to children whose classrooms are staffed by substitutes.
NEWS
By a Sun reporter, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
Jeff Singer, the longtime president and chief executive officer of Health Care for the Homeless, announced his retirement Thursday, and the organization said it was immediately launching a search committee to identify a successor. Singer's 40-year career advocating for homeless people and families included 13 years at the helm of Health Care for the Homeless, which he joined in 1987. During his tenure, the group tripled the size of a Baltimore-based clinic and state headquarters and launched new dental and pediatric programs, and he oversaw a budget that quadrupled from $3.2 million in 1998 to $13.5 million this year.
NEWS
August 19, 1992
Baltimore no longer has a reliable advocate on federal issues, and the city suffers. The federal government's decision to keep the new Health Care Financing Administration headquarters in Woodlawn is the latest unfortunate example of what happens when no one in Maryland's congressional delegation strongly argues the city's position.Baltimore County had a vocal advocate in Republican Helen Bentley, who pleaded the county's case at every turn. As the LTC senior Republican in the delegation, Mrs. Bentley had special access to the Bush administration.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 14, 2011
Margaret Ann Ulle, an advocate for the developmentally disabled, died of an infection Saturday at Roland Park Place. She was 91. Born Margaret Ann Black in Baltimore and raised in Pittsburgh and Ardmore, Pa., she earned a liberal arts degree at what was then Randolph-Macon Woman's College. She earned a diploma at Peirce Business College in Philadelphia and returned to Baltimore in 1942 and became secretary to several John Hopkins University presidents. She worked with Isaiah Bowman from 1942 to 1949 and Detlev Bronk from 1949 to 1951.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Michael T. McCarthy Sr., a longtime Electrolux vacuum cleaner salesman who helped foster children find homes in his retirement, died on Jan. 23 of sudden cardiac arrest at the Baltimore-Washington Medical Center. The longtime Cockeysville resident was 69. Raised in Philadelphia, the sixth of seven siblings, Mr. McCarthy graduated from North Catholic High School there in 1961 and spent about nine years, starting in his late teens, as a brother with the Oblates of St. Francis DeSales in Wernersville, Pa. There, he was responsible for taking care of the grounds and working on the farm, according to his daughter, Jennifer Jones.
EXPLORE
October 26, 2012
Sunday, Oct. 21, we lost former U.S. Sen. George McGovern. Although many will recall his disastrous 1972 loss to Richard Nixon and his subsequent leadership in getting us out of Vietnam, his truly lasting legacy will be his war on hunger and malnutrition. In 1977, following extensive public hearings, McGovern's Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs published Dietary Goals for the United States, a precursor to today's Dietary Guidelines. It marked the first time that a U.S. government document recommended reduced meat consumption.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Sylvia "Cookie" Harris, the wife of Rep. Andy Harris and a prominent anti-abortion advocate in Annapolis, died suddenly on Thursday, a spokeswoman for the congressman said. Mrs. Harris, who would have turned 58 this weekend, was a frequent presence in Annapolis, where state lawmakers said she was a forceful advocate for causes she believed in, particularly anti-abortion policies. "She was an amazing and wonderful woman, a fabulous mother and very supportive of Andy in all that he did," said Diana Waterman, chairwoman of the Maryland Republican Party.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Looking to protect Marylanders from unsafe levels of smog, environmental regulators are moving to clamp down on pollution from the state's smaller coal-burning power plants, but plant owners warn that the rule could have economic consequences. The Maryland Department of the Environment recently unveiled a draft rule two years in the planning that would require coal-burning plants in the Baltimore and Washington areas to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides by 48 percent over the next four years.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
President Barack Obama, who is attempting to help Democrats maintain their grip on the Senate, will attend a fundraiser Friday at the home of a wealthy Baltimore hedge fund manager who has become one of the nation's foremost advocates for Israel. Howard E. Friedman, a former president of the powerful American Israel Public Affairs Committee, or AIPAC, and a leading patron of Jewish political causes, will host Obama for a dinner that will cost guests up to $32,400 - the maximum an individual may give to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in the calendar year.
NEWS
By John Fritze and By John Fritze | September 6, 2014
Federal employees will be allowed to carry money on their health savings accounts into the next year following a months-long lobbying effort by Sen. Ben Cardin of Maryland and other lawmakers in the region. Some 323,000 federal workers set aside a portion of their earnings, tax-free, in flexible spending accounts, or FSAs, to pay for health expenses. Until now, they have forfeited money not spent by the end of the year. The Office of Personnel Management announced last week that employees would be allowed to carry over up to $500 beginning in 2015.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Sylvia "Cookie" Harris, the wife of Rep. Andy Harris and a prominent anti-abortion advocate in Annapolis, died suddenly on Thursday, a spokeswoman for the congressman said. Mrs. Harris, who would have turned 58 this weekend, was a frequent presence in Annapolis, where state lawmakers said she was a forceful advocate for causes she believed in, particularly anti-abortion policies. "She was an amazing and wonderful woman, a fabulous mother and very supportive of Andy in all that he did," said Diana Waterman, chairwoman of the Maryland Republican Party.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
For some people, environmentalism is a lifelong passion. That would be true of Michael Beer, retired biophysics professor at Johns Hopkins University, who died Friday at age 88.  He was devoted to protecting and restoring the Jones Falls, the stream that runs through the heart of Baltimore, as well as one of its most popular tributaries, Stony Run. Rallying others to his cause, he founded the Jones Falls Watershed Association, which later merged...
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Critics took aim Tuesday at proposed regulations to create a medical marijuana industry in Maryland as a state commission tasked with writing the rules rushed toward a deadline it might not meet. Physicians, patients, advocates and potential growers said the commission did not collect enough public input before drafting the rules - which they said appear to forbid a medical marijuana dispensary anywhere within Baltimore city limits. Final regulations are due in less than three weeks, but the public hearing in Annapolis Tuesday was the commission's first.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | March 12, 1995
Paul F. Kelly, whose personal struggle with drug addiction left him HIV-positive and made him a nationally recognized advocate for those similarly afflicted, died Thursday of acquired immune deficiency syndrome at Fort Howard Veterans Hospital. He was 42.The Walbrook resident, who had grown up in the South Bronx in New York, became addicted at 12 and spent most of the next two decades addicted to drugs and alcohol. He recalled living in vacant buildings and eating from garbage cans until he had a religious conversion and sought a cure.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Dr. Peter O. Kwiterovich Jr., an internationally known expert on lipid disorders who was the founder and director of the Johns Hopkins Lipid Clinic and was an early advocate for routine cholesterol screening in children, died Friday of prostate cancer at his Roland Park home. He was 74. "We have lost a true giant in the field of cardiovascular disease. He was one of the quiet pioneers at Hopkins," said Dr. George J. Dover, pediatrician-in-chief at Johns Hopkins Hospital and director of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
Victoria F. "Vickie" Gelfman, a prosecutor in the Howard County state's attorney's office whose blog posts about her struggle with acute myeloid leukemia served as an inspiration to others, died Friday of the disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Ellicott City resident was 31. "Vickie was such a shining star. She was very gifted, talented and had a warm spirit," said Howard County District Judge Pamila J. Brown. "She had a wonderful spirit and a pleasant demeanor. And as a prosecutor, she represented the state so well.
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