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NEWS
December 22, 2010
I applaud the article by Aaron Dorfman, "Smarter grant-making" (Dec. 21) in which Mr. Dorfman encourages foundations to invest in "advocacy" activities that help change the root causes of social problems. However, in my view, Mr. Dorfman does not go far enough, actually shortchanging the benefits of investments in policy advocacy and grass roots organizing. In the article, Mr. Dorfman contrasts foundation investments in policy advocacy and grass roots organizing with those of direct services to individuals.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
A recent raid at a Catonsville apartment complex has raised concerns that federal immigration agents are using Maryland motor vehicle data to locate illegal immigrants, potentially undermining a state initiative to ensure that drivers are ready for the road regardless of their citizenship status. Residents of the Melvin Park Apartments said Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents pulled over several vehicles within a few blocks of the complex last month and asked for the registered owners by name.
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NEWS
June 26, 2011
I'm concerned that readers took away from Matt Patterson's op-ed ("U2: Great music in the service of dubious charity," June 22) the perception that advocacy is an inappropriate role for charities. On the contrary, by bringing together staff, board, volunteers and community members, charities of all sizes contribute in important ways to the exchange of information and ideas that is fundamental to our democratic system. Among the countless benefits: safer roads, healthier public spaces, protections for abused women, research dollars to cure disease, more humane treatment of animals.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Baltimore Immigration Court, facing an increase in the number of cases involving immigrant children who crossed the border illegally, is expediting reviews to more quickly decide whether the children should be deported, according to attorneys with clients before the court. The so-called "rocket docket," created in response to a directive last month from the Obama administration to fast-track the cases, has meant the children receive initial hearings within 21 days and in some cases are given a matter of weeks, instead of months, to find an attorney.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2011
When the Maryland Transportation Authority board met in a work session last week to hammer out the final details of what is expected to be the largest toll increase in the state's history, there were only two people there besides members and staff. One was a reporter who pretty much had to be there to do his job. The other was a state senator who didn't have to be there to do hers. That legislator was Sen. Nancy Jacobs, a Republican who represents Harford and Cecil counties — two jurisdictions that have a huge stake in the outcome of the board's deliberations.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
The American Civil Liberties Union and some advocacy groups urged the City Council on Thursday to scrap a tough youth curfew bill and instead implement a plan that calls for more social programs for young people. But Councilman Brandon Scott, lead sponsor of the curfew bill, said the critics misunderstand the legislation and waited too long to get involved. "If they were so concerned about this, why haven't they made these suggestions before?" he asked. Scott said he expects the council to give final approval to the bill Monday.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
Advocates for crime victims and those who provide services for them, including police, huddled Monday in Annapolis as they worked with state officials on ways to better help the thousands of people harmed by crime in Maryland each year. The sessions were the latest step toward the Governor's Office of Crime Control & Prevention's plan to issue a report and recommendations this fall for improving assistance to crime victims. "This is the first-ever blueprint from victims," said Kristen Mahoney, executive director of the office that funnels federal and state grant money to law enforcement, nonprofit agencies and others.
NEWS
October 4, 2000
The student: William Moriarty, 16 School: Glenelg High School Special achievement: Participated in the first Maryland Youth Leadership Forum for Students with Disabilities sponsored by the state at Bowie State University. In the forum, participants with disabilities learned advocacy skills and set individual goals to help the community. William, who has Duchenne muscular dystrophy, was chosen to participate based on the strength of essays in which he described his leadership capabilities and long-term community service objective.
NEWS
July 15, 2005
Columbia-based advocates for low-income families hoped to pressure the county in 1983 to provide developers with incentives to build more housing for their clients. Part of their strategy was a loose alliance with the business community, which had long lobbied for similar incentives. "We can't get anything done if we don't work with them," said Amy Reisch, chairwoman of the advocacy committee of the Association of Community Services, at the time. The committee, with representatives from several service agencies, also planned to step into the debate over the county's proposed rezoning plan, which included several measures to increase housing density if developers in turn built more housing for moderate-income people.
NEWS
By Aaron Dorfman | December 20, 2010
What our nation needs more than anything else from its grant-making foundations in 2011 is an evolution in thinking and practice related to funding policy advocacy and grass-roots community organizing. Research shows that advocacy, community organizing and civic engagement by nonprofit groups make a substantial, measurable difference in the lives of families and communities. Whether in red states or blue states, rural areas or major cities, when foundations invest in such policy engagement efforts, the return on investment is tremendous.
NEWS
By Michelle Minton | July 30, 2014
This month, Maryland banned high-proof liquors like Everclear and other inexpensive tipples . Self-proclaimed public health activists claimed such "high octane" liquors increased the likelihood of binge-drinking and sexual assaults on college campuses. While the merits of the ban are debatable, one aspect of it is not: the use of taxpayer money to support a political agenda.   The "grain alcohol ban" was backed by the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems, a coalition of researchers and administrators at 10 Maryland colleges and universities.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Driver advocacy organization AAA Mid-Atlantic, known for its roadside assistance and insurance and travel services, is moving headlong into a new market in Maryland: automotive repair and maintenance. "It's a major retooling of our retail structure," said Bernhard M. Koch, the group's president and CEO, at the official opening of the group's newest retail shop and mechanic's garage in Columbia on Friday. While AAA will continue to give its seal of approval to independent auto repair shops through its "approved automotive repair network," which includes about 80 shops in Maryland, its own entrance into the market has been expanding at a steady clip in recent years.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
If Yevola Peters were ever in a tight spot, she hopes that someone would be willing to lend a hand. That's why the 78-year-old Annapolis resident has devoted her life to advocating for at-risk families and children in the Annapolis area. "We are our brother's keepers," she said. "I've been fortunate so far - but you never know what could happen. " Peters, a former music teacher in several public school systems across Maryland - including Anne Arundel - began her advocacy work in 1966 when she started volunteering with the Community Action Agency, an anti-poverty nonprofit in the county that worked with families and youth.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
The American Civil Liberties Union and some advocacy groups urged the City Council on Thursday to scrap a tough youth curfew bill and instead implement a plan that calls for more social programs for young people. But Councilman Brandon Scott, lead sponsor of the curfew bill, said the critics misunderstand the legislation and waited too long to get involved. "If they were so concerned about this, why haven't they made these suggestions before?" he asked. Scott said he expects the council to give final approval to the bill Monday.
NEWS
By Cory Booker | April 23, 2014
This year, approximately 60,000 Americans will be diagnosed with Parkinson's, joining the 1 million people already living with the disease in the United States and the 4 million to 6 million diagnosed with it worldwide. Their painful struggle is one that I know all too well. I remember when my dad first had symptoms of Parkinson's, a motor system disorder that results from the loss of certain brain cells. For him, it started with a persistent numbness in his arm and hand that led to a decades-long battle with the ever-increasing symptoms that eventually took his life in 2013.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Equality Maryland has endorsed Sen. Brian Frosh, a Montgomery County Democrat, for attorney general, calling him a "firm ally" of the state's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. "He has the maturity, experience and commitment to be an effective advocate for the LGBT communities of Maryland as our next Attorney General,” said Carrie Evans, Equality Maryland's executive director, in a statement Monday. Evans credited Frosh with helping secure passage this legislative session of the Fairness for All Marylanders Act, which prohibits discrimination against transgender people in employment, housing and public places.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2001
When the owners of the Dutch Connection flower shop in Baltimore decided they were ready to expand, they turned for help to the Governor's Office of Small Business Advocacy and Small Business Assistance. They received a $40,000 loan and plan to double the size of their shop on Canterbury Road to nearly 3,000 square feet beginning next month. Ken Maher, who owns the Dutch Connection with his wife, Paula Dobbe-Maher, said that, thanks to the state's help, he is now adding a second component to his flower shop.
NEWS
September 21, 1995
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities was described incorrectly in an article yesterday as a "labor-backed advocacy group." In fact, the center, which receives little assistance from labor, describes itself as a liberal research group.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Six regional and national advocacy organizations have filed arguments in federal court on behalf of a transgender retired police sergeant who brought a discrimination suit against Howard County after she was rejected for a volunteer police mounted patrol. The American Civil Liberties Union, its Maryland chapter and four organizations devoted to civil rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people have asked the U.S. District Court for permission to file a "friend of the court" brief to support Tomi B. Finkle.
SPORTS
By Mike King and The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Within a four-hour radius of the Gunpowder River area live 16 million people, said Theaux Le Gardeur, owner of Backwater Angler in Monkton. A 1977 series in The Evening Sun called the Gunpowder "The River You Drink. " "This is such a vital local treasure," Le Gardeur said. For him, protecting the river, pictured in many maps within Backwater Angler, is a priority. In 2010, he had an awakening after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the worst in U.S. history. Ever since, he has led the nonprofit Gunpowder Riverkeeper organization to protect the area through regulation.
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