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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has created an advisory council to help improve the city's minority and women-owned business enterprise program, the mayor's office announced Wednesday. The 25-member Mayor's Council on Minority and Women-Owned Business Enterprises will be headed by Robert L. Wallace, author and CEO of Bithgroup Technologies. Maria Welch Martinez, CEO of Respira Medical, will serve as vice-chair. Other members include local businesspeople and representatives from the City Council and state legislature.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts will meet with members of the city's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community this month to answer questions, address concerns and share progress that has been made within the department in the last year. The April 14 community forum, organized by the police department's LGBT Advisory Commission that was founded last year, follows a lightly-attended hate-crime forum in Mount Vernon in October , where Batts and many of his top brass nearly outnumbered the attendees.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | January 13, 1993
Puzzled by news the governor planned to disband them, members of Gov. William Donald Schaefer's advisory council on AIDS decided last night to work as an unofficial watchdog for the legislature or anyone else who wants to listen.The decision came at the end of a meeting in which members, although clearly miffed, seemed resigned to extinction after five years of advising a governor with whom they were frequently at philosophical odds.But the council shifted direction after a few of its members and several activists said Maryland needs their technical advice, especially on the raft of AIDS-related proposals likely to face the legislature this session.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
A panel of advisers to an established senior center on the edge of Mount Vernon is protesting a proposal to lease space in its city-owned building to Baltimore's gay community center. The Waxter Center Advisory Council fears younger patrons of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore could disturb older patrons of the building's senior center, which has been in operation for nearly 40 years, said Lester Buster, president of the advisory council. "We just don't know whether or not that will be a good mix," said Buster, 79, of West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1998
North County legislators, trying to slow down an auto racetrack proposed on Maryland Port Authority land in Pasadena, have introduced an amendment to a Senate bill that would require an advisory council review before building permits are issued.The Middle River Racing Association is considering the site of a former copper refinery owned by the Port Authority for a 54,800-seat racetrack, but several community groups object to what they call an attempt to rush County Council approval.Legislators were reacting to a bill introduced in the County Council by Thomas W. Redmond Sr., a Pasadena Democrat, that would allow the racetrack on the property as a conditional use, a zoning classification that requires no public hearing.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | March 30, 1992
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's Advisory Council on Adolescent Pregnancy went out of business last week, with a small private luncheon at City Hall and thanks from the mayor.But Mr. Schmoke acknowledged that most of the program the council recommended in a 77-page report will not be started for lack of money. His Advisory Council on Adolescent Pregnancy was disbanded, he added, because "its work is over.""They developed the policy," he said. "We've moved now from policy development to the implementation phase."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1998
The first order of business for the new chairman of the Freedom Advisory Council is a membership drive.Phil Bennett, who took over leadership of the 15-member citizens group last month, wants to expand the board and draw representatives from the many homeowners associations in South Carroll, the county's most populous area with about 28,000 residents."
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2003
Saying she wants to "listen to voices that haven't been heard," Maryland's school leader has launched a campaign to involve parents in decision-making at the top levels of the State Department of Education. Last week, state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick announced formation of a Maryland Parent Advisory Council, which will confer regularly with state officials on such issues as parents' rights and the roles of parents in student testing. Such parental involvement is required by the federal No Child Left Behind Act. The council, which Grasmick said would comprise about 40 members, would be statewide, but leadership would rotate among regions.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
Howard County police are recruiting people to join the chief's citizens advisory council - a little-known panel that meets behind closed doors each month, likely in violation of the state open-meetings law. The 23-person panel, in existence since 1990, advises Chief Wayne Livesay on everything from his annual budget to the department's racial profiling policy. But unlike groups that advise other area police departments - or a similar panel that advises the county schools - Howard's police advisory group does not post its meetings, open them to nonmembers or publish minutes afterward.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | October 14, 2007
Carroll County officials are considering ways of recovering more recyclable materials rather than landfilling the waste or hauling it away. In the next three months, waste consultant Richard V. Anthony of San Diego, Calif., will prepare a report advising Carroll how to throw away less trash, based on last week's meetings with local agricultural, environmental and business leaders, trash haulers and county and municipal employees. These sessions on how to generate less waste come as the Carroll County Environmental Advisory Council has urged the commissioners to increase local recycling efforts rather than first building an expensive waste-to-energy trash-burning facility with Frederick County.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
Making good on a promise by Baltimore police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts after the severe beating of a gay East Baltimore man, the city Police Department announced Friday a special advisory council to help improve its relations with the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. The panel of activists, civil rights advocates and attorneys also plans to work to improve the atmosphere for gay and transgendered officers within the Police Department as it increases efforts to recruit from that community.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2012
Robert L. Wallace, CEO of Baltimore-based Bithgroup Technologies, has spent more than two decades building a minority-owned business into a multimillion-dollar success and writing and lecturing about entrepreneurship. The Cherry Hill-born mechanical engineer recently was tapped to head a new, 25-member advisory council created by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to help improve the city's minority- and women-owned business enterprise program. Wallace, who attended city public schools and earned an MBA from Dartmouth College, worked for DuPont and IBM in Baltimore in the 1980s before starting his company, which is now located in Mount Vernon.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has created an advisory council to help improve the city's minority and women-owned business enterprise program, the mayor's office announced Wednesday. The 25-member Mayor's Council on Minority and Women-Owned Business Enterprises will be headed by Robert L. Wallace, author and CEO of Bithgroup Technologies. Maria Welch Martinez, CEO of Respira Medical, will serve as vice-chair. Other members include local businesspeople and representatives from the City Council and state legislature.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
Ruth M. Kirk, a former state delegate who served West Baltimore for 28 years, has died, city officials said Friday evening. Kirk, 81, who was born in Baltimore, represented the 44th District from 1983 until this past January. Her seven terms ended when she lost to Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. last fall. "She was a tireless advocate for the neighborhoods she served, and dedicated herself to strong and thoughtful constituent service," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
NEWS
April 13, 2008
Howard Community College will sponsor a weeklong series of events April 21-25 in observance of Earth Day, April 22, when a celebration will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the college's Duncan Hall lobby. Environmental organizations and organic stores and farms will be on hand. Those who attend can participate in a water taste-off, plant flowers and recycle plastic grocery bags. Leonardo DiCaprio's environmental film, The 11th Hour, will be shown at 12:30 p.m. in the Kittleman Room (ELB-100)
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | October 14, 2007
Carroll County officials are considering ways of recovering more recyclable materials rather than landfilling the waste or hauling it away. In the next three months, waste consultant Richard V. Anthony of San Diego, Calif., will prepare a report advising Carroll how to throw away less trash, based on last week's meetings with local agricultural, environmental and business leaders, trash haulers and county and municipal employees. These sessions on how to generate less waste come as the Carroll County Environmental Advisory Council has urged the commissioners to increase local recycling efforts rather than first building an expensive waste-to-energy trash-burning facility with Frederick County.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1996
Howard County police told residents last night that the problem of juvenile crime is growing. While a small gathering of citizens sat patiently in Long Reach High School's cafeteria, police officers read aloud crime statistics and spoke of ways to combat what many see is a growing menace in the county.Maj. Wayne Livesay said that the police have been surprised to find that more and more juveniles are being arrested in street crimes, especially robberies.Violent crime in the county was up by 77 percent in 1996, with the number of robberies almost doubling.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2002
The Howard County Council is moving quickly to fill a vacancy on the five-member Board of Appeals at a critical time - as the county moves to hire a hearing examiner who will change the way the board operates. Yesterday, after considering a dozen applications and interviewing five candidates, the council nominated a semiretired environmental engineer and lawyer who lives in Owen Brown in Columbia. The council will vote on the choice March 4. Albert J. Hayes, 65, serves on the state air quality control advisory council with two Howard County Council members - Democrats Guy J. Guzzone of North Laurel-Savage, and Mary C. Lorsung of West Columbia.
NEWS
August 26, 2007
Ulman, O'Malley at Hammond High County Executive Ken Ulman and Gov. Martin O'Malley will visit Hammond High School at noon Tuesday to hear students' comments and concerns during the first week of school. School Superintendent Sydney L. Cousin, Principal Sterlind S. Burke, members of the Principal's Student Advisory Committee and other state and county officials are expected to be on hand. The guests plan to have lunch with students, who will be encouraged to discuss the education they are receiving or any other education-related issues.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | March 18, 2007
Carroll County officials will learn more details next month on the feasibility of building a waste-to-energy plant -- a massive trash-burning project that would cost hundreds of millions of dollars and take five years to complete, according to county public works director J. Michael Evans. But the county's Environmental Advisory Council has urged officials to thoroughly research other waste disposal options, such as expanding local recycling and composting efforts, before making a decision on the costly facility.
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