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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1994
Carroll County's Economic Development Commission gained three new members yesterday.The three local business executives will serve on the county advisory commission for two years.The new members are:* Dana Caro, head of F&M Manufacturing in Westminster. His company -- which started about 10 years ago in Hampstead -- makes parts for companies such as Black & Decker Corp., builds components for projects in the space program and constructs robotics for the military and the U.S. Postal Service.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore County schools Superintendent Dallas Dance was named this week to the federal Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans by President Barack Obama. The commission was created in 2012 and is tasked with identifying ways to increase the number of black teachers and administrators, boosting their college enrollment and graduation rates, and investing in early childhood education programs. The commission is chaired by University of Maryland, Baltimore County President Freeman A. Hrabowski III. Other members include Gwendolyn E. Boyd, president of Alabama State University; Sharon J. Lettman-Hicks, executive director and chief executive officer of the National Black Justice Coalition; and Michael L. Lomax, president and chief executive officer of the United Negro College Fund.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | September 25, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer said yesterday that he had appointed a nine-member advisory commission that ultimately could compose the private authority he's proposing to operate Baltimore-Washington International Airport.The commission, announced during a breakfast at BWI for more than 200 corporate representatives, is designed to give business a more active role in the state-owned airport, which is operated by the Maryland Department of Transportation."We need to find more ways to involve the private sector in marketing and managing BWI," the governor said.
NEWS
By Robert M. Summers and Joseph P. Gill | March 10, 2014
In 2011, Governor Martin O'Malley issued an executive order giving the state departments of the environment and of natural resources a clear directive: Determine whether and how natural gas production from the Marcellus Shale in Maryland can be realized without unacceptable risk to public health, safety, the environment and natural resources. The order established the Marcellus Shale Safe Drilling Initiative and instructed the agencies, in consultation with an advisory commission, to investigate and report back to the governor and the General Assembly.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2002
An advisory commission approved in concept a final list of proposed changes to Anne Arundel County's charter last night, including one that would give elected officials a break from the business of governing -- in December or the summertime. Charter Revision Commission Chairman Thomas E. Riggin said yesterday that the five-member group will deliver its recommended charter amendments to the County Council on Monday. Commission members will appear before the council June 3 to answer questions.
NEWS
By Stacey Evers and Stacey Evers,States News Service | March 26, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Tom McMillen of Maryland has accused the Defense Department of using its base-closure process to "sidestep" and "undermine" an advisory commission charged with streamlining the operation of military laboratories.The Pentagon next month will present a list of bases to bclosed or consolidated over the next several years. Contrary to the wishes of some congressmen, the list is expected to include military laboratories, 13 of which are in Maryland.The lawmakers oppose the inclusion of labs in this year'base-closure recommendations because last fall they chartered an advisory commission to study the consolidation of defense research and development centers.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | October 11, 2009
Guy Salomon of Gwynn Oak writes: I read with interest your recent column about the Task Force on Fisheries Management and have some questions. I checked the August meeting summary and noted a list of attendees that included you under "Other Attendees." Can anyone attend these meetings, and if so what is the process to be able to? Can attendees add their two cents? Who appoints the attendees? Seems that there are a lot of "official groups" (read money and backing). How are they selected?
BUSINESS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 1, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The chairman of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee said yesterday he is concerned that a recommended restructuring of the state's taxes collected from telecommunications operations could mean a windfall of more than $30 million for the C&P Telephone Co. and other telephone companies that operate in Maryland.The break would come from elimination of the 2 per cent gross receipts tax now paid by telecommunications operations to the tune of $33 million, almost $20 million of which comes from C&P. "It's a major tax break for a company," said Sen. Laurence Levitan, D-Montgomery.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | September 1, 1993
Creation of new citywide festivals and expansion of existing ++ events such as Artscape and the Preakness Celebration are among the projects being eyed by a newly created mayoral advisory commission on tourism and culture.The commission is also considering setting up a new visitors center in the Inner Harbor that would sell tickets for several area attractions and feature a professionally produced film about the city.Leonard Sachs, a businessman and chairman of the group, said that the commission wanted to create major new events that would involve several existing tourist attractions and cultural activities.
NEWS
By John Rivera and Richard H. P. Sia | July 1, 1991
The threatened closure of the Naval Electronics Systems Engineering Activity in St. Inigoes was averted yesterday when a federal commission exempted naval engineering facilities from consolidation.The commission also voted to delay action on naval laboratories, which affects several sites in Maryland, until a parallel FTC commission studying military laboratories completes its work.The Navy had wanted to overhaul its research program by creating new engineering centers on the Pacific and Atlantic coasts, with facilities including St. Inigoes, in St. Mary's County, relocated to Portsmouth, Va.The Navy also proposed consolidating labs specializing in air and surface warfare, which would eliminate jobs at facilities in White Oak, Annapolis and Carderock in Maryland.
NEWS
By Ann Bristow, Paul Roberts and Nick Weber | February 24, 2014
After 25 meetings in 30 months, Maryland's Safe-Drilling Advisory Commission can show nearly finalized recommendations for overhauling the regulation of gas drilling by the Maryland Department of Environment and Department of Natural Resources (MDE and DNR). Two other major undertakings, studies of economic impacts and health impacts, have early summer deadlines. Less determined are work-plans for analyzing transportation concerns and drilling risks. Together, these unfinished studies form the backbone of a final report due in about 150 days, on Aug. 1. We propose that there is no way to meet this deadline - for good reasons.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Harford County Councilman Dion Guthrie noticed a bit of smoke in his home on a recent morning and immediately called 9-1-1. The Joppa-Magnolia Volunteer Fire Co. arrived within minutes and doused a fire that had begun in mulch on the side of the house, he said. "Ours is a volunteer service that is doing an outstanding job," said Guthrie. "Why would we want to change it?" However, County Executive David R. Craig said sweeping changes are critical to keeping the service viable and oversight is critical given the county's $10 million annual contribution to its 12 volunteer companies.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | October 11, 2009
Guy Salomon of Gwynn Oak writes: I read with interest your recent column about the Task Force on Fisheries Management and have some questions. I checked the August meeting summary and noted a list of attendees that included you under "Other Attendees." Can anyone attend these meetings, and if so what is the process to be able to? Can attendees add their two cents? Who appoints the attendees? Seems that there are a lot of "official groups" (read money and backing). How are they selected?
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | February 14, 2009
A high-profile state task force is recommending that Maryland stop spending millions of dollars to plant oysters in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries only to let watermen harvest them. The 21-member Oyster Advisory Commission says the state should stop paying for such "managed reserves" over the next several years and instead help watermen learn how to raise oysters at their own expense for sale to restaurants and seafood businesses. "I just don't think the public is going to be willing to pay very much longer for a couple hundred guys to make some of their income harvesting oysters," William Eichbaum, chairman of the advisory commission and a vice president of the World Wildlife Fund, said yesterday.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 17, 2006
One of my favorite bumper stickers asks: "Where are we going and why am I in this handbasket?" The state's fisheries managers must be thinking something along those lines as they face, perhaps, their greatest challenge since the five-year striped bass moratorium ended in 1990. Maryland recreational fishermen exceeded their striped bass allocation by 60 percent in each of the past two spring seasons, creating a situation that raised not only eyebrows but also the ire of the regulatory board that sets quotas and assesses punishments for exceeding them.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | August 28, 2006
A commission studying how major growth at Aberdeen Proving Ground will affect Harford County land use was top-heavy with development-related members and did not have sufficient community input, an activist group contended last week after the panel released its first report. In a letter sent last week to Harford County Executive David R. Craig, the group, Friends of Harford, said it "stood alone" on a subcommittee formed to examine Harford's readiness for growth. The 15-member subcommittee was chaired by an attorney for a prominent development law firm - the only subcommittee not headed by a government official - and featured presentations by homebuilders, Realtors and developers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
James Edwin Gutman, a former department store executive whose concern for the Chesapeake Bay led him to chair the Maryland Water Quality Advisory Commission, died Wednesday from complications of Parkinson's disease at Holy Cross Rehabilitation Center in Burtonsville. He was 81.A longtime Mount Washington resident, Mr. Gutman and his wife of 48 years, the former Ruth Binswanger, moved to the banks of Cypress Creek in Severna Park in 1971. Since the late 1930s, he had worked for Julius Gutman and Co., the family department store that became Brager-Gutman.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | November 18, 1990
With over two years of research, meetings and planning by a great number of knowledgeable people, why did the rockfish season come to an abrupt halt, long before it was due to end?The question has many answers: the season started on a holiday weekend; temperatures hovered in the unseasonable mid-80s; fish were much larger than expected; and live bait was very successful on the larger striped bass.But the overriding reason the season was so short was because the Department of Natural Resources fishery managers lacked the experience to actually "manage" a fishery.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 20, 2006
Just as sure as God made little striped rockfish and created humans bound and determined to catch them regardless of the rules, Buddy Harrison never expected that his most recent foray into the world of poaching would stir up such a firestorm. But because the charter-boat captain with 50 Chesapeake Bay years under his keel and three similar convictions on his record decided to flout the law again, the state has decided it's time to pull out the big bat. The two advisory boards appointed by the governor to help mold fish policy will meet Thursday night at the Department of Natural Resources headquarters in Annapolis to decide what to do with people like Tilghman Island's self-proclaimed "Boss Hogg."
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | July 13, 2003
How healthy is the rockfish population? Healthy enough that the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission has given permission to expand the Chesapeake Bay fishing zone during the two weeks after spring trophy season. During May 16-31, anglers will be able to fish five miles upstream from the mouths of the Choptank, Chester and Patuxent rivers. Previously, the line was drawn across the mouths of those tributaries. The commission also moved the boundary in the main stem of the upper bay north to five miles above Brewerton Channel.
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