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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 8, 2006
Mary Purnell "Bunny" Ellicott, who wrote a personal advice column for a Baltimore newspaper in the early 1920s and was a founder of a downtown women's club, died Nov. 30 at the Broadmead retirement community, where she had been the oldest resident. She was 109. Born Mary Purnell Gould in Baltimore, she grew up at 713 Park Ave., a block away from Charles Joseph Bonaparte, who was then President Theodore Roosevelt's attorney general. Her uncle had been a classmate of Woodrow Wilson's at Johns Hopkins University.
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FEATURES
By Andy Wolt | June 11, 2013
Some of you may recognize me from my SpaceManAndy advice column in City That Breeds. Well, I've decided to focus my efforts here, on the LGBT community. As a gay man living in Baltimore, I'm here to answer any and every question you can throw at me. Sometimes it just helps to get a little third party perspective. Your friends might tell you what you want to hear, but I will give you my honest opinion on what's best. I mean, I don't even know you, I wouldn't even know how to placate you. You can write in with questions on all sorts of topics.
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FEATURES
January 1, 2004
Today we begin a new year - and a new daily advice column - Ask Amy. Amy is Amy Dickinson, a former Time magazine family columnist who has more than 20 years of professional reporting experience and vast personal experience as a single mother and member of a large extended family. Her column, which is the successor to that of the late Ann Landers, replaces Dear Abby as our regular advice column. Since its debut last summer, Ask Amy has become the advice column in numerous newspapers. Look for Ask Amy Monday through Saturday in the Today section and Sunday in Home & Family.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 8, 2006
Mary Purnell "Bunny" Ellicott, who wrote a personal advice column for a Baltimore newspaper in the early 1920s and was a founder of a downtown women's club, died Nov. 30 at the Broadmead retirement community, where she had been the oldest resident. She was 109. Born Mary Purnell Gould in Baltimore, she grew up at 713 Park Ave., a block away from Charles Joseph Bonaparte, who was then President Theodore Roosevelt's attorney general. Her uncle had been a classmate of Woodrow Wilson's at Johns Hopkins University.
FEATURES
August 5, 2002
Hundreds of votes were cast online. Scores more arrived by mail and e-mail. We got more advice on advice columnists than we imagined. The decision: Dear Abby, the venerable column once penned by Ann Landers' sister, and now by Ann's niece, will succeed Ann Landers as The Sun's daily advice column. For the Dear Abby column, it's a kind of homecoming. The column appeared in the morning Sun for many years before the paper merged with The Evening Sun several years ago. It is still the most widely syndicated column in the world, with about 90 million readers in more than 1,200 newspapers every day. The column was written from its beginning in 1956 by Pauline Phillips (left)
FEATURES
By Colleen Freyvogel and Tori Campion and Colleen Freyvogel and Tori Campion,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2002
"I will probably slump over at my typewriter when I am 90, and that will be it. At least that is the way I would like it to be." - Ann Landers, 1990 Venerable advice columnist Ann Landers didn't quite make it to age 90, dying Saturday at 83 from cancer. But the estimated 90 million readers who consult her column every day will still be able to get her advice - at least for another month. Landers, whose real name was Esther "Eppie" Lederer, penned her column a month in advance, so it will continue to run in The Sun and many other newspapers until July 27. Those columns will be the final chapters in Landers 40-year reign as the queen of advice columnists, a period in which her pithy responses on virtually any subject imaginable grew to be the most widely syndicated column in the world, appearing in more than 1,200 newspapers.
FEATURES
By Andy Wolt | June 11, 2013
Some of you may recognize me from my SpaceManAndy advice column in City That Breeds. Well, I've decided to focus my efforts here, on the LGBT community. As a gay man living in Baltimore, I'm here to answer any and every question you can throw at me. Sometimes it just helps to get a little third party perspective. Your friends might tell you what you want to hear, but I will give you my honest opinion on what's best. I mean, I don't even know you, I wouldn't even know how to placate you. You can write in with questions on all sorts of topics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF COLUMNIST | August 3, 2003
Love Me, by Garrison Keillor. Viking. 272 pages. $24.95. Larry Wyler, the protagonist of Garrison Keillor's funny, bittersweet new novel, is a struggling writer who's bored to death with life in Minnesota and frustrated with his sensible, do-gooder wife - although he certainly seems to be handling it well. Here, for instance, is his gracious reaction when a friend announces that he's just sold his new book to Random House. "I wanted to choke him. I wanted to give him a swift kick where the sun don't shine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | November 2, 2003
When Eppie Lederer died June 22, 2002, she took "Ann Landers" with her. The legendary advice columnist had years earlier asked her only child, a journalist herself, if she would continue the column, and Margo Howard had declined. "I didn't want to work that hard," she confesses in A Life in Letters: Ann Landers' Letters to Her Only Child (Warner Books, 416 pages, $22). So, the name "Ann Landers," which Landers owned, was retired at her death, and, as was the case with Erma Bombeck, more than a byline is gone.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 23, 1993
People in the industry told me Modern Neurotic never had a chance, that a new magazine targeted toward the chronically anxious would do a quick crash and burn.But our thinking was: Look, millions of people wrestle with unresolved feelings due to unconscious conflict.Why not give them a voice, something besides that inner voice that tells them to run downstairs and make sure the front door is locked for the 34th time?Anyway, the cover of our premier issue was originally supposed to feature an agoraphobic housewife from Pompton Lakes, N.J., peering under a bed at this huge, grinning monster labeled "Our Hidden Fears."
BUSINESS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
Cal Ripken Jr. always envisioned a career beyond playing baseball for the Orioles, but writing an advice column for a newspaper? Ripken, who gave up his professional athletic career at the end of the 2001 season, has agreed to answer readers' questions in a weekly column in The Sun called "Ask Cal." The column, set to launch on Oct. 23 in the paper's new Modern Life section, which runs on Sundays, will target parents who have questions about their offsprings' sports activities. "I am excited to have a great forum like this that will enable me to interact with other sports parents and give them my perspective on some issues," Ripken said.
FEATURES
January 1, 2004
Today we begin a new year - and a new daily advice column - Ask Amy. Amy is Amy Dickinson, a former Time magazine family columnist who has more than 20 years of professional reporting experience and vast personal experience as a single mother and member of a large extended family. Her column, which is the successor to that of the late Ann Landers, replaces Dear Abby as our regular advice column. Since its debut last summer, Ask Amy has become the advice column in numerous newspapers. Look for Ask Amy Monday through Saturday in the Today section and Sunday in Home & Family.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | November 2, 2003
When Eppie Lederer died June 22, 2002, she took "Ann Landers" with her. The legendary advice columnist had years earlier asked her only child, a journalist herself, if she would continue the column, and Margo Howard had declined. "I didn't want to work that hard," she confesses in A Life in Letters: Ann Landers' Letters to Her Only Child (Warner Books, 416 pages, $22). So, the name "Ann Landers," which Landers owned, was retired at her death, and, as was the case with Erma Bombeck, more than a byline is gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF COLUMNIST | August 3, 2003
Love Me, by Garrison Keillor. Viking. 272 pages. $24.95. Larry Wyler, the protagonist of Garrison Keillor's funny, bittersweet new novel, is a struggling writer who's bored to death with life in Minnesota and frustrated with his sensible, do-gooder wife - although he certainly seems to be handling it well. Here, for instance, is his gracious reaction when a friend announces that he's just sold his new book to Random House. "I wanted to choke him. I wanted to give him a swift kick where the sun don't shine.
FEATURES
August 5, 2002
Hundreds of votes were cast online. Scores more arrived by mail and e-mail. We got more advice on advice columnists than we imagined. The decision: Dear Abby, the venerable column once penned by Ann Landers' sister, and now by Ann's niece, will succeed Ann Landers as The Sun's daily advice column. For the Dear Abby column, it's a kind of homecoming. The column appeared in the morning Sun for many years before the paper merged with The Evening Sun several years ago. It is still the most widely syndicated column in the world, with about 90 million readers in more than 1,200 newspapers every day. The column was written from its beginning in 1956 by Pauline Phillips (left)
FEATURES
July 29, 2002
Who is a worthy successor to advice columnist Ann Landers, who died in June? The Sun is considering several possibilities, and wants your opinion. Tell us what you think of today's columns and the various columns we publish in the Today section this week. You can vote online at The Sun's Web site, www.sunspot.net/advice, where you will also find an archive of the columns. Or, mail your comments to Ann's Successor, c/o Features Department, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, or e-mail to sun.features@balt sun.com.
FEATURES
By Vicki Hengen and Vicki Hengen,BOSTON GLOBE | October 22, 1995
Just having celebrated its 10th anniversary, Elle has risen, head and powdered shoulders, above the fashion pack. These days it offers intelligent profiles and arts reviews, sleek design and typography, and a genuinely funny advice column -- to say nothing of fashion spreads full of clothes that women might actually wear.Thus, hopes were high when the November issue plugged a Q &A with Catherine Deneuve -- a thinking woman's movie star and the face that launched a million bottles of Chanel.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | June 14, 1994
Maggie Wunderlich and Kristen Trumpler scrolled through the copy on the computer screen, just as they had during the past six months of editing Freedom Elementary School's bimonthly newspaper.But this day they were in no hurry. There were no deadlines to meet or reporters to hound for late copy to fill the pages of the Freedom News. Now it was just fun -- the last issue of the year had been put to bed."We had a good time," Kristen, 10, said Friday of her job as co-editor of the paper."Yeah," Maggie agreed.
FEATURES
By Colleen Freyvogel and Tori Campion and Colleen Freyvogel and Tori Campion,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2002
"I will probably slump over at my typewriter when I am 90, and that will be it. At least that is the way I would like it to be." - Ann Landers, 1990 Venerable advice columnist Ann Landers didn't quite make it to age 90, dying Saturday at 83 from cancer. But the estimated 90 million readers who consult her column every day will still be able to get her advice - at least for another month. Landers, whose real name was Esther "Eppie" Lederer, penned her column a month in advance, so it will continue to run in The Sun and many other newspapers until July 27. Those columns will be the final chapters in Landers 40-year reign as the queen of advice columnists, a period in which her pithy responses on virtually any subject imaginable grew to be the most widely syndicated column in the world, appearing in more than 1,200 newspapers.
FEATURES
By Vicki Hengen and Vicki Hengen,BOSTON GLOBE | October 22, 1995
Just having celebrated its 10th anniversary, Elle has risen, head and powdered shoulders, above the fashion pack. These days it offers intelligent profiles and arts reviews, sleek design and typography, and a genuinely funny advice column -- to say nothing of fashion spreads full of clothes that women might actually wear.Thus, hopes were high when the November issue plugged a Q &A with Catherine Deneuve -- a thinking woman's movie star and the face that launched a million bottles of Chanel.
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