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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
William G. "Bill" Evans, an award-winning Baltimore advertising executive who was the creative force behind the enduring "Charm City" advertising campaign of the early 1970s, died June 20 of cancer at the Hospice of Queen Anne's in Centreville. He was 83. "Bill certainly came out of the 'Mad Men' world. He was one of the first new breed of intellectual advertising writers. And he was definitely a character. There is no question about that. He was a very unique guy and writer," recalled ad executive Allan Charles, who began working with Mr. Evans in the early 1970s.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The Democratic Governors Association has put $750,000 into an advertising campaign questioning Republican nominee Larry Hogan's commitment to education. The national group works to elect Democrats, but the ad released this past week never mentions the party's nominee in Maryland, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown. Instead, the advertisement focuses on Hogan's position that the state cannot afford an expanded prekindergarten program, which is the signature issue of Brown's campaign. "Around here, we need a governor who understands that education makes Maryland work for middle-class families, but instead of investing in our kids, Larry Hogan says that we should give corporations $300 million more a year in tax breaks," the ad says.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | May 12, 2011
Preakness organizers just released another Kegasus commercial to get beer-chugging, centaur-loving college kids fired up for next weekend's InfieldFest at Pimlico. I'm still confused by the advertising campaign, but it has apparently worked: Ticket sales are up 17 percent . So while I try to figure out what I'm missing here, check out this video of Kegasus blow-drying his hair/mane:
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, whose once wholesome reputation took a blow in a high-profile domestic violence case this year, will no longer "raise the green flag" for M&T Bank. Rice has starred in one of the bank's most recognizable and successful branding efforts for the past four years, but the Ravens-themed advertising campaign kicked off Monday without the former pitchman. None of his teammates appear in the ads either. M&T's new advertisements instead stress the team effort between the the Ravens and their corporate sponsor, with the spokesman role shifting to Ravens Head Coach John Harbaugh, team President Dick Cass and the bank's president of the Baltimore region, Augie Chiasera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
Burger King launched a national advertising campaign yesterday to introduce its new best-in-class BK menu items -- made-to-order salads, wraps, crispy chicken strips, smoothies and frappes.  Celebrity pitchmen for the rollout campaign include Jay Leno, Mary J. Blige, Steven Tyler, Salma Hayek and Sofia Vergara. This David Beckham spot has a cute payoff. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0f8qz2Ssr6c&feature=autoplay&list=PL63019AD07261F847&lf=plpp_play_all&playnext=4     
NEWS
January 23, 1991
Calling trash both a "symbol and a symptom of urban decay," Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke announced yesterday the beginning of a massive advertising campaign and community-based projects to clean up Baltimore."
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Census Bureau unveiled its first-ever paid advertising campaign yesterday as part of a $167 million effort to reach minority groups that have been missed in past national head counts.The campaign is aimed at reversing a 30-year trend toward fewer Americans completing and returning the census forms that are mailed out once a decade. The ads will target groups that have historically been undercounted: blacks, Latinos, American Indians and new immigrants from all countries.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2011
Baltimore sports apparel company Under Armour has for the first time in its 15-year history hired an outside firm to manage its media account. The company said Monday it has signed a contract with Optimum Sports, a division of Omnicom Media Group, to buy media spots and do other media planning. One of its first tasks will be to advise Under Armour on a new advertising campaign to promote its footwear line during the back-to-school season. Under Armour is in the midst of revamping it footwear line after disappointing sales in some categories.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | March 25, 1994
Get used to him. You'll be seeing him all over Baltimore television and cable channels and hearing him on radio next month."Please don't be frightened. I'm not going to hurt anybody," he says.Philadelphia-native Mark Sarian, a 26-year-old living in Canton, will perform in a series of 30-second commercials promoting downtown Baltimore businesses and attractions. Mr. Sarian beat out more than 300 contestants who auditioned this month to be the host of the "Downtown Baltimore Show.""I won the human lottery," says Mr. Sarian, manager of Britches Great Outdoors clothing store in Bethesda.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | March 6, 1991
Timothy F. Finley, chief executive officer of Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc., has persuaded its bondholders to switch to equity ownership in a move that has saved the Baltimore-based retailer from bankruptcy.Struggling under $70 million in debt as a result of a 1986 leveraged buyout, the company was close to filing for Chapter 11 reorganization, Finley said. However, during a press conference yesterday to announce a new advertising campaign, Finley said that bondholders had agreed in principal to swap their bonds for preferred and common stock.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
William G. "Bill" Evans, an award-winning Baltimore advertising executive who was the creative force behind the enduring "Charm City" advertising campaign of the early 1970s, died June 20 of cancer at the Hospice of Queen Anne's in Centreville. He was 83. "Bill certainly came out of the 'Mad Men' world. He was one of the first new breed of intellectual advertising writers. And he was definitely a character. There is no question about that. He was a very unique guy and writer," recalled ad executive Allan Charles, who began working with Mr. Evans in the early 1970s.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
For $130,000, Maryland health officials are getting the word out on health reform to Ravens fans listening to the radio or visiting the team website. To catch the promotions in the stadium, though, don't blink. Maryland Health Connection, the insurance marketplace created as part of federal health reform, is being featured in dozens of 30-second radio commercials, including one apiece on WBAL Radio and 98 Rock during each game broadcast. Others air during pre- and post-game coverage, and the marketplace is the title sponsor of a Wednesday night Ravens news show on WBAL.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2012
The Maryland Democratic Party is asking state prosecutors to investigate what it says are "serious campaign finance violations" by a group that opposes the state's Dream Act. The director of the group called the claims "bogus. " Brad Botwin, who founded Help Save Maryland six years ago, described the challenge as "another violation of my First Amendment rights. " The Dream Act, if approved by voters next month, would extend in-state tuition breaks at the state's public colleges and universities to some illegal immigrants who have graduated from high school in Maryland, whose families have filed state income taxes, and who meet other requirements.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
Burger King launched a national advertising campaign yesterday to introduce its new best-in-class BK menu items -- made-to-order salads, wraps, crispy chicken strips, smoothies and frappes.  Celebrity pitchmen for the rollout campaign include Jay Leno, Mary J. Blige, Steven Tyler, Salma Hayek and Sofia Vergara. This David Beckham spot has a cute payoff. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0f8qz2Ssr6c&feature=autoplay&list=PL63019AD07261F847&lf=plpp_play_all&playnext=4     
NEWS
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
Surprising absolutely no one, the Maryland Jockey Club announced Monday Kegasus, the tweeting centaur, would return as the official mascot of the Preakness Infield. This was a move that was more or less predicted back in February, when several media watchers saw a new anonymous advertising campaign as the Jockey Club's transparent bid to create some mystery around the event. In February, the drum beat for Preakness began with an anonymous advertising campaign premised on the idea that the fictional character Kegasus had disappeared, and two new characters, the Easter Bunny and a leprechaun, should replace it as the mascot.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2011
Baltimore sports apparel company Under Armour has for the first time in its 15-year history hired an outside firm to manage its media account. The company said Monday it has signed a contract with Optimum Sports, a division of Omnicom Media Group, to buy media spots and do other media planning. One of its first tasks will be to advise Under Armour on a new advertising campaign to promote its footwear line during the back-to-school season. Under Armour is in the midst of revamping it footwear line after disappointing sales in some categories.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
The quotes flash across the lawyer's Web site like the snippets that assault theatergoers in movie trailers. "DANGEROUS in front of a jury." "Thoroughly prepared, aggressively pursued." "Scoring with the jury, Rolex and all." Then, a questionnaire takes shape on the screen: Do you have a billion-dollar set of facts? Is the target's conduct egregious? Can the target afford to pay if you win? Answer "no" to even one of these questions, and you'll be redirected to a photo of attorney Stephen L. Snyder in an indoor pool, shirtless with sunglasses atop his balding head, flashing a double thumbs-down sign.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | February 18, 1993
The Board of Estimates gave tentative approval yesterday to a $200,000 matching grant to city tourism officials for an advertising campaign to bring badly needed business and conventioneers to Baltimore.The board reserved final approval of the grant until tourism officials present a detailed marketing plan -- a delay that was prompted by Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean's query about what the agency had done in the last few years to sell the city."I want to see what they're doing and how they're spending the money," Mrs. McLean said later.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | May 12, 2011
Preakness organizers just released another Kegasus commercial to get beer-chugging, centaur-loving college kids fired up for next weekend's InfieldFest at Pimlico. I'm still confused by the advertising campaign, but it has apparently worked: Ticket sales are up 17 percent . So while I try to figure out what I'm missing here, check out this video of Kegasus blow-drying his hair/mane:
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | June 25, 2008
Tyson Foods Inc. has settled a multimillion-dollar lawsuit filed by two competitors, including Maryland's Perdue Farms, alleging that the Arkansas company used deceptive marketing to lie about its antibiotics use in poultry. But now the company faces lawsuits from consumers. Four cases claiming to represent thousands of people have been filed this month in federal courts across the country, including two in Baltimore since Friday. Each seeks class action status, and each alleges that Tyson violated state consumer protection acts.
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