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Gus G. Sentementes | March 5, 2012
The fallout of Rush Limbaugh calling a law student a "slut" and a "prostitute" for advocating insurance coverage for birth control continues: AOL pulled its advertising money from his radio show, according to a Facebook update by the technology company . (AOL has a major division, Advertising.com, in Baltimore.) Per AOL, two hours ago on its FB page, which has 279,000+ followers: At AOL one of our core values is that we act with integrity. We have monitored the unfolding events and have determined that Mr. Limbaugh's comments are not in line with our values.
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BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Several days after the video of former Ravens running back Ray Rice punching his then-fiancee became public, a few NFL sponsors balked at having their ads aired as planned during the Ravens' nationally televised Thursday night game against the Pittsburgh Steelers on CBS. One sponsor asked to have its ad broadcast in a different game, according to a published report that the network did not dispute. Another requested that its ad air at a different point than originally scheduled in the Sept.
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BUSINESS
By Chris Korman and Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
The TV ads are quirky, the advertiser unusual: Advance, a Cockeysville-based document management company, has run a campaign during Ravens games showing executives kicking around off-the-wall ideas in a boardroom. Business-to-business advertisers don't normally target mass audiences. Football games typically offer up a steady diet of beer and car commercials. But Advance has used its ads to build a reputation for approachability and service. "We're really trying to build on the idea that we're about relationships, and about being made up of a group of people who are going to care about your business," said Jeff Elkin, president of Advance.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
An online advertising firm started in Baltimore and owned by AOL plans to remain in the city, having signed a new long-term lease in Brewer's Hill, according to the owner of the building. Advertising.com, which currently has offices in the Tide Point complex, is likely to move by the spring of 2015, said David Knipp of Obrecht Commercial Real Estate, which is to become the firm's landlord at the National East building on O'Donnell Street. AOL confirmed plans to move, but did not provide further information.
NEWS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1997
In a move aimed at strengthening its regional business, The Baltimore Sun Co. announced yesterday plans to buy Patuxent Publishing Co., a Columbia-based publisher of weekly newspapers and other publications.Patuxent publishes 13 weekly papers in Howard and Baltimore counties, including the Columbia Flier, the Jeffersonian and the Northeast Times Reporter. It also publishes seven community telephone directories and two magazines, concentrated in Howard and Carroll counties. Combined, Patuxent publications have an average circulation of more than 250,000 a week.
NEWS
April 16, 1992
The Maryland Court of Appeals has approved new rules for print, radio and television advertising by lawyers. When the rules go into effect July 1, celebrity endorsements by non-lawyers will not be allowed, attorneys will not be able to mention their won-lost records, and ads saying clients won't have to pay if their lawyer loses the case will be prohibited.The Evening Sun would like to know what you think. Are the new rules fair? Or, should lawyers be free to advertise without any restrictions?
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | April 12, 2007
Fallout over the racially insensitive comments by radio talk-show host Don Imus intensified yesterday as MSNBC announced that it will immediately cease simulcasting the Imus in the Morning radio program. Meanwhile, two major sponsors suspended their advertising from the show, and a former NAACP president who is on the CBS board joined those who have urged Imus' dismissal. A week after Imus referred to the mostly black Rutgers University women's basketball team as "nappy-headed hos" following the team's second-place finish in this year's NCAA tournament, opposition to the longtime radio personality continues to mushroom.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
William G. "Bill" Evans, an award-winning Baltimore advertising executive who was the creative force behind the enduring "Charm City" advertising campaign of the early 1970s, died June 20 of cancer at the Hospice of Queen Anne's in Centreville. He was 83. "Bill certainly came out of the 'Mad Men' world. He was one of the first new breed of intellectual advertising writers. And he was definitely a character. There is no question about that. He was a very unique guy and writer," recalled ad executive Allan Charles, who began working with Mr. Evans in the early 1970s.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2002
Franklin Rae Foster, an advertising executive whose clients ranged from the banking industry to politicians, died of heart failure Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Roland Park resident was 75. A partner in the Foster & Green advertising agency in the Mount Vernon neighborhood, he specialized in national industrial accounts. He also handled advertising for Mercantile-Safe Deposit & Trust Co., the Maryland Lottery and several Democratic political campaigns. He retired in 1990.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | February 13, 1991
Picture the museum of the 22nd century. After you've gone through the ancient Romans and Greeks, the Byzantines, the Gothic, the renaissance, the baroque, rococo and realists, on through the Impressionists, painting would virtually disappear from the walls after, say, the abstract expressionists.Instead, you would enter a room featuring technology. Video screens would be on the walls in place of the paintings. And at each you would pause and watch 30- or 60-second television commercials, the highest and most important art form of the second half of the 20th century.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. turned in a better-than-expected second quarter Wednesday, thanks to strong advertising sales and lower expenses to operate its television stations. The Hunt Valley broadcaster said it earned $41.3 million, or 42 cents per share, in the three months ended June 30, compared with $17.8 million, or 19 cents per share, a year earleir. Wall Street analysts had expected earnings of 37 cents per share. Shares of Sinclair closed up 49 cents each at $32.30 share Wednesday.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
Chicago's 2008 privatization of its municipal parking assets is widely considered to be a colossal boondoggle. Los Angeles considered selling off a few of its parking garages earlier this decade but scrapped the idea after it became clear that the deal wouldn't be nearly as good as initially advertised. Pittsburgh's city council killed a parking privatization deal in 2010 amid concerns about hidden costs in the proposed contract. In 2013, Cincinnati signed a deal to privatize its parking, but then voters rebelled, electing an anti-privatization mayor and city council, who promptly killed the plan.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
William G. "Bill" Evans, an award-winning Baltimore advertising executive who was the creative force behind the enduring "Charm City" advertising campaign of the early 1970s, died June 20 of cancer at the Hospice of Queen Anne's in Centreville. He was 83. "Bill certainly came out of the 'Mad Men' world. He was one of the first new breed of intellectual advertising writers. And he was definitely a character. There is no question about that. He was a very unique guy and writer," recalled ad executive Allan Charles, who began working with Mr. Evans in the early 1970s.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Charles C. "Chas" Stieff II, former executive vice president of the Kirk-Stieff Co. who had been active in civic affairs, died May 17 of heart failure at the Broadmead retirement community. He was 92. Charles Clinton Stieff II was born in Baltimore, the son of Gideon Numsen Stieff and Claire von Marees Stieff. In 1892, his grandfather, Charles C. Stieff, established the silversmith Stieff Co., which in 1979 merged with Samuel Kirk & Sons to form Kirk-Stieff Co. Mr. Stieff was raised on Ridgewood Road in Roland Park.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Millennial Media has long faced competition for advertising dollars from entrenched giants like Google and Apple, but it was another household name - Facebook - that took a bite out of the Baltimore company's earnings and sent its stock plummeting last week. The social network took the Baltimore-based company by surprise, grabbing a share of its customers who buy ads on mobile devices to drive downloads and draw users to their smartphone and tablet applications, analysts said. That contributed to a tripling of Millennial's first-quarter losses, announced Wednesday.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | March 3, 2014
Bitcoin believers were shaken to their digital souls when Mt. Gox, the world's largest exchange, defaulted on $470 million worth of deposits and closed. The virtual currency was supposed to provide a safer, more private and less costly alternative to money issued by governments. But lacking the imprimatur of a sovereign, it is failing. Fundamentally, money provides a secure place to keep your wealth — you can store your savings for later use at a government guaranteed bank.
NEWS
By ANDREA K. WALKER and ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
Today is an anomaly for the television commercial. That's because people watching the Super Bowl are expected to turn off their iPods, put their cellular phones on vibrate and turn off the TiVo to actually watch the advertising pitches. In the age of new media and digital technology, the television commercial has come under increased pressure to attract viewers' attention. The Super Bowl is one of the few remaining TV events for which companies can count on a large audience. Some people even watch for the commercials and not the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JESSICA BERTHOLD and JESSICA BERTHOLD,THE MORNING CALL | June 29, 2006
If you pitted "Got Milk?" against "You're Fired!" it'd be tough to judge which phrase is better known. For better or worse, advertising is as much a part of pop culture as anything else in the media. Yet while film and television critics abound, there are few who make a career out of scrutinizing advertisements for content, theme and stupidity. That's where blog Adrants (adrants.com) comes in. The site gives short, punchy descriptions and saucy opinions about new ad campaigns, as well as news and commentary on the industry itself.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. capped a year of strong broadcast revenue growth and station acquisitions with a 33 percent jump in fourth-quarter sales but a drop in profit as the Hunt Valley company paid off debt. The broadcaster reported income of $2.3 million, or 2 cents per share, in the three months ended Dec. 31, compared with net income of $59 million, or 72 cents per share, in the final three months of 2012. Its shares slid more than 5 percent to close at $26.34 each on the Nasdaq.
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