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Adverse Effects

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NEWS
By Elisabeth Rosenthal and Elisabeth Rosenthal,New York Times News Service | October 3, 1991
The most popular prescription sleeping pill in the world was banned in Britain yesterday because of safety concerns, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it had no immediate intention to follow suit.Although the drug, Halcion, has been the focus of a growing debate regarding its side effects over the last two years, health officials in this country were surprised by the British prohibition. They said they knew of no new studies that would shed light on the medication, which has been linked at times with memory loss and violent behavior.
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NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun Reporter | July 1, 2008
More than a year after they took the hallucinogen found in "magic mushrooms," volunteers in a Johns Hopkins study rated the experience as one of the most meaningful and spiritually important of their lives, researchers reported today. The results suggest that hallucinogenic compounds, long considered taboo after widespread abuse in the late 1960s, represent both an untapped resource to help people cope with trauma, and a scientific tool for exploring human spirituality, the authors said.
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NEWS
By Vernon Loeb and Vernon Loeb,Los Angles Times | October 6, 2006
During her clinical work as a young physician, Dr. Derjung Mimi Tarn treated a number of patients who failed to realize they needed to continue taking medications for their chronic conditions. She wondered whether poor communication by their doctors might have been partly responsible. It would appear so. In a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, Tarn and five colleagues found that physicians "often fail to communicate critical elements of medication use" and do not regularly describe possible adverse effects of the drugs they prescribe.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,sun reporter | April 11, 2008
The Anne Arundel Medical Center, in Annapolis, has been fined $20,000 by the Maryland Department of the Environment after reporting two separate incidents in which cancer patients received the wrong doses of radiation. The second mishap occurred in November, months after the hospital was ordered to take corrective action after a similar incident in May, MDE officials said. The fine was the maximum allowed for two such incidents, according to Roland Fletcher, the MDE's program manager for radiological health.
NEWS
November 5, 2004
JUST A MONTH ago, Merck & Co. withdrew its popular painkiller Vioxx from the market, citing a long-term study that showed increased risks of heart attacks among its users. At the time, Merck CEO Raymond V. Gilmartin said that the findings were unexpected. But recent news reports raise questions about what and when Merck knew about the drug's potential dangers, and whether the company was more focused on corporate profits than on consumer safety. Vioxx, which helped ease arthritis and other pain for about 20 million Americans, was a blockbuster drug for Merck, generating about $2.5 billion annually.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 23, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Officials at the Environmental Protection Agency who are supposed to evaluate scientific studies warning of potential health dangers now say the agency has overlooked such warnings on at least 10 chemicals.One of those warnings concluded that metam sodium, the pesticide spilled last month in the Sacramento River after a train derailed in California, caused severe spinal and brain birth defects in laboratory animals.The EPA said yesterday that it had received a study from the manufacturer that the chemical could cause birth defects in rats in 1987 but had never reviewed it.For three weeks after the spill, California environmental officials told nearby residents that the chemical did not pose a serious health risk.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2000
Shares in Human Genome Sciences Inc., which have rocketed more than 500 percent in the past 12 months, jumped even higher yesterday in expectation of an announcement today that the company will expand human trials of an experimental drug to control a painful side effect of chemotherapy. Shares in Human Genome gained $9.50, or 5.2 percent, to $194.125 on the Nasdaq. The stock traded as low as $28.75 in February. The drug, Repifermin, is being tested to see if it can control mucositis. The condition is marked by painful sores in the mouth and throat that often follow chemotherapy, which kills the mucosal cells.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun Reporter | July 1, 2008
More than a year after they took the hallucinogen found in "magic mushrooms," volunteers in a Johns Hopkins study rated the experience as one of the most meaningful and spiritually important of their lives, researchers reported today. The results suggest that hallucinogenic compounds, long considered taboo after widespread abuse in the late 1960s, represent both an untapped resource to help people cope with trauma, and a scientific tool for exploring human spirituality, the authors said.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2003
Representatives of the makers of an herbal supplement linked to the death of Orioles prospect Steve Bechler fought back yesterday against allegations that the supplement - ephedra - contributed to his fatal heatstroke. Bechler, 23, died Monday after collapsing during workouts the day before at Orioles spring training camp in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Pills of a product containing ephedra were found in his locker, and the local medical examiner said the substance almost certainly played a role in the death and should be banned by Major League Baseball.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | August 4, 2006
Do nasal steroids taken for allergies cause eye problems? Steroids, especially those inhaled through the mouth to control asthma and those taken orally or intravenously for conditions such as arthritis and emphysema, can cause side effects in the eye, including cataracts and glaucoma. But steroids such as Flonase, which are sniffed just through the nose, appear to be fairly safe for the eye. In fact, the most common side effects of nasal steroids are a burning sensation in the nose or bleeding, especially if steroids are sprayed directly on the septum, the cartilage-based tissue that divides the two nostrils, said Dr. Ralph Metson, a sinus surgeon at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
NEWS
By Vernon Loeb and Vernon Loeb,Los Angles Times | October 6, 2006
During her clinical work as a young physician, Dr. Derjung Mimi Tarn treated a number of patients who failed to realize they needed to continue taking medications for their chronic conditions. She wondered whether poor communication by their doctors might have been partly responsible. It would appear so. In a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, Tarn and five colleagues found that physicians "often fail to communicate critical elements of medication use" and do not regularly describe possible adverse effects of the drugs they prescribe.
BUSINESS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY and ALLISON CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | August 18, 2006
Linthicum Heights-based Wise Metals Group LLC is losing one of its biggest customers, putting the future of the troubled aluminum sheet manufacturer in question. In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the company disclosed that it will lose the beverage can sheet business of Philadelphia-based Crown Cork & Seal Co. Inc., one of the three largest beverage can manufacturers in the world, for the fourth quarter and all of 2007. Crown Cork & Seal agreed to continue buying sheet from Wise for its food products, though it represents a substantially smaller business.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | August 4, 2006
Do nasal steroids taken for allergies cause eye problems? Steroids, especially those inhaled through the mouth to control asthma and those taken orally or intravenously for conditions such as arthritis and emphysema, can cause side effects in the eye, including cataracts and glaucoma. But steroids such as Flonase, which are sniffed just through the nose, appear to be fairly safe for the eye. In fact, the most common side effects of nasal steroids are a burning sensation in the nose or bleeding, especially if steroids are sprayed directly on the septum, the cartilage-based tissue that divides the two nostrils, said Dr. Ralph Metson, a sinus surgeon at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
NEWS
November 5, 2004
JUST A MONTH ago, Merck & Co. withdrew its popular painkiller Vioxx from the market, citing a long-term study that showed increased risks of heart attacks among its users. At the time, Merck CEO Raymond V. Gilmartin said that the findings were unexpected. But recent news reports raise questions about what and when Merck knew about the drug's potential dangers, and whether the company was more focused on corporate profits than on consumer safety. Vioxx, which helped ease arthritis and other pain for about 20 million Americans, was a blockbuster drug for Merck, generating about $2.5 billion annually.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2003
Representatives of the makers of an herbal supplement linked to the death of Orioles prospect Steve Bechler fought back yesterday against allegations that the supplement - ephedra - contributed to his fatal heatstroke. Bechler, 23, died Monday after collapsing during workouts the day before at Orioles spring training camp in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Pills of a product containing ephedra were found in his locker, and the local medical examiner said the substance almost certainly played a role in the death and should be banned by Major League Baseball.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2000
Shares in Human Genome Sciences Inc., which have rocketed more than 500 percent in the past 12 months, jumped even higher yesterday in expectation of an announcement today that the company will expand human trials of an experimental drug to control a painful side effect of chemotherapy. Shares in Human Genome gained $9.50, or 5.2 percent, to $194.125 on the Nasdaq. The stock traded as low as $28.75 in February. The drug, Repifermin, is being tested to see if it can control mucositis. The condition is marked by painful sores in the mouth and throat that often follow chemotherapy, which kills the mucosal cells.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | November 26, 1991
Untreated high blood pressure, or hypertension, can cause strokes, heart attacks and kidney damage. But many of the drugs commonly used to treat it can make you feel tired during exercise. Some can even cause impotence and elevated blood cholesterol. It's best to know what the drug you're taking can do to your body.Treatment for high blood pressure is to lose weight. If overweight, follow a low-fat diet and avoid stimulants such as coffee. If these measures don't reduce your blood pressure, your doctor will prescribe an anti-hypertension medication -- such as a beta blocker, diuretic or a calcium channel blocker.
BUSINESS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY and ALLISON CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | August 18, 2006
Linthicum Heights-based Wise Metals Group LLC is losing one of its biggest customers, putting the future of the troubled aluminum sheet manufacturer in question. In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the company disclosed that it will lose the beverage can sheet business of Philadelphia-based Crown Cork & Seal Co. Inc., one of the three largest beverage can manufacturers in the world, for the fourth quarter and all of 2007. Crown Cork & Seal agreed to continue buying sheet from Wise for its food products, though it represents a substantially smaller business.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | November 26, 1991
Untreated high blood pressure, or hypertension, can cause strokes, heart attacks and kidney damage. But many of the drugs commonly used to treat it can make you feel tired during exercise. Some can even cause impotence and elevated blood cholesterol. It's best to know what the drug you're taking can do to your body.Treatment for high blood pressure is to lose weight. If overweight, follow a low-fat diet and avoid stimulants such as coffee. If these measures don't reduce your blood pressure, your doctor will prescribe an anti-hypertension medication -- such as a beta blocker, diuretic or a calcium channel blocker.
NEWS
By Elisabeth Rosenthal and Elisabeth Rosenthal,New York Times News Service | October 3, 1991
The most popular prescription sleeping pill in the world was banned in Britain yesterday because of safety concerns, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it had no immediate intention to follow suit.Although the drug, Halcion, has been the focus of a growing debate regarding its side effects over the last two years, health officials in this country were surprised by the British prohibition. They said they knew of no new studies that would shed light on the medication, which has been linked at times with memory loss and violent behavior.
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