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By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 11, 1990
Great Expeditions is a bimonthly publication that describes trips not often found in the brochures at a travel agent's office.The magazine has tips, such as the autumn issue's advisory that some hotels in Baja California already are booked for the July 11 solar eclipse next year. Destination articles include Benin in Africa, Japan, southern Mexico, Chile, Galapagos Islands and Israel. The magazine is published in Canada, and a six-issue subscription costs $18. For a free sample issue, write Box 8000-411, Sumas, Wash.
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By Karen Mawdsley and The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
For Becky Perlow, the next destination looms 19,341 feet above sea level. The goal? Reaching the top of Tanzania's Mount Kilimanjaro, located 3 degrees south of the equator and deemed by many the highest free-standing and "walkable" mountain in the world. That's easier said than done, but Perlow's father, Howard, said he thinks his daughter will make it. "When she sets a goal, she usually finds a way to complete that goal," he said. Since 1991, Kilimanjaro-goers have been legally required to climb with a guide, so Perlow, 26, is hitting the hillside with the travel organization Adventures Within Reach and three other climbers, excluding the guides.
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By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media | October 1, 1991
"In only two instances has anyone actually lost their lunch while we were up in the air." Those are the encouraging words of Steve Coan, four-time U.S. aerobatic champion, a member of the fast-growing "adrenalin-rush" vacation industry.For $175, Coan will take you up in his bright red, open-cockpit 1930s-style biplane for a half-hour over Maui, Hawaii, you'll never forget. He starts with a variety of vertical moves, followed by what he considers modest loops. If you're willing to continue, he moves on to more ambitious "four-leaf clover" loops.
TRAVEL
By McClatchy-Tribune | September 14, 2008
Can you direct me to some reliable organizations or Web sites for senior singles travel? I'm 65 and looking to travel with a group of other singles. Travel can be expensive, limited or lonely for singles, because most of the travel industry views the world through the prism of "double occupancy." But millions of active baby boomers are starting to hit retirement age - and many are single, divorced, widowed or married to spouses who don't care to travel. So expect to see an ever-increasing array of tour and cruise choices.
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By Mike Steere and Mike Steere,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 1998
In 1967, tens of thousands of the young and idealistic converged on San Francisco, proclaiming the Summer of Love and doing everything they could to appall their elders and upend the status quo.That same year, a tiny group left San Francisco on a trip that would do for Americans' travel habits what the grand gathering of hippies did for the world. The wave the trip started would, in a quiet and gradual way, blow the mainstream travel establishment's mind, expanding the range and intensity of human experience, pushing back the limits of the possible.
FEATURES
By John Rasmus and John Rasmus,Universal Press Syndicate | November 11, 1990
Ten years ago, adventure travel still was in its "expeditionary phase," and Richard Bangs was working the frontier harder and better than anyone.White-water raft trips were the hot adventure trip of the time, and Mr. Bangs was the world's leading purveyor of white water. He had a knack for cooking up high-adrenalin "first descents" of obscure and often dangerous wilderness rivers, and in the late '70s and early '80s there seemed to be plenty of those to go around. Every season, Mr. Bangs and his company, Sobek Expeditions, seemed to come up with new ones: the Bio-Bio in Chile, the Zambezi in Africa, the Tatshenshini in Canada.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Contributing Writer | July 18, 1993
Paul Rosenfield hiked up an Alaskan glacier, kayaked in the rain alongside whales and sea lions and saw bald eagles and bears in the wild . . . all before he was 3.Now 4, he'll be making his second trip to the Alaskan wilderness later this summer with his parents and 8-year-old brother."
TRAVEL
By McClatchy-Tribune | September 14, 2008
Can you direct me to some reliable organizations or Web sites for senior singles travel? I'm 65 and looking to travel with a group of other singles. Travel can be expensive, limited or lonely for singles, because most of the travel industry views the world through the prism of "double occupancy." But millions of active baby boomers are starting to hit retirement age - and many are single, divorced, widowed or married to spouses who don't care to travel. So expect to see an ever-increasing array of tour and cruise choices.
NEWS
By Katherine Marks and Katherine Marks,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 3, 1996
Maryland native Jeannette Belliveau recently wrote what she feels is a different sort of travel book to help Americans better understand their travels to exotic countries."
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | January 21, 2007
We are planning a visit to Masai Mara, Kenya. Can you suggest any mid-priced companies for a safari? Kenya's tourism Web site, magicalkenya.com, has information on lodging, dining, parks and safaris. You can even find listings of U.S. tour operators that offer safaris to various national reserves, including the Masai Mara, Kenya's most popular game park. Mountain Travel Sobek (mtsobek.com), for instance, has safaris in the Masai Mara with lodging from tented camps to upscale lodges. Expect to pay at least $500 per day per person, although spokeswoman Nadia LeBon said the kind of safari you're looking for will determine how much you pay. California-based Adventure Travel (adventuretravel.
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | January 21, 2007
We are planning a visit to Masai Mara, Kenya. Can you suggest any mid-priced companies for a safari? Kenya's tourism Web site, magicalkenya.com, has information on lodging, dining, parks and safaris. You can even find listings of U.S. tour operators that offer safaris to various national reserves, including the Masai Mara, Kenya's most popular game park. Mountain Travel Sobek (mtsobek.com), for instance, has safaris in the Masai Mara with lodging from tented camps to upscale lodges. Expect to pay at least $500 per day per person, although spokeswoman Nadia LeBon said the kind of safari you're looking for will determine how much you pay. California-based Adventure Travel (adventuretravel.
TRAVEL
By New York Times News Service | December 10, 2006
Some destinations are off-limits for political, safety or even moral issues; they are so dangerous or ruled by such an oppressive regime that a vacation there is almost unthinkable. But for some adventurous people, those very barriers are incentive of sorts, a challenge to taste the forbidden fruit. Iran may be one of those places next year - and not just because the Iranian government is reportedly offering cash incentives ($20 a head) to travel agencies that recruit Europeans and Americans for trips to the country.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2005
One morning in February, just as dawn broke, Janet Ridgway found herself gazing over the African continent from the top of Mount Kilimanjaro. It was hard to believe: The 65-year-old former kindergarten teacher with the "short" legs, bundled in a parka, breath streaming out in the thin, frosty air, was standing on the roof of Africa. Awed and humbled, she thought about her late husband, and about the mother who had raised her long ago in a very small, very flat town in Kansas. Then she posed for photos with her companions, five other women who came together to climb the 19,340-foot peak, and in so doing symbolically joined the growing ranks of women pursuing travel without the company of men. Not only are more women signing up for active vacations with women-only operators like Adventures in Good Company, the Baltimore-based company that mounted the African journey, they are also taking all-female trips to spas and vineyards, filling up theater and shopping tours, and making pilgrimages to sacred sites.
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By Galen Rowell and Galen Rowell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 1998
Perhaps the Incas planned it this way.With each step away from the arid highlands of Peru's Andes into moist, forested Amazonia, a sense of times past, of spirituality, became stronger. On the edge of these two worlds, where lizards bask in the sun and orchids bloom in the jungle, they had perched their sacred town, hidden behind green-clothed monoliths.As we walked the last downhill mile, the jungle and orchids grew more profuse, the road receded from view, and then we were there, at the classic overlook of the fabled "Lost City of the Incas," Machu Picchu.
FEATURES
By Tina Kelley and Tina Kelley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 1998
Sure, you can get all excited about going suborbital, somersaulting weightlessly and bringing home the complimentary astronaut suit. But the potentially coolest thing about traveling to space with Zegrahm Space Voyages, a Seattle-based adventure-travel company, is playing with the space toys.Imagine holding in your hand a padded, clear sphere and watching the water inside it gradually become weightless and disperse into a cloud of droplets. After all, when riding in a Space Cruiser worth tens of millions of dollars, you can't just let a glass of water or hot Tang loose inside.
FEATURES
By Patrick Joseph and Patrick Joseph,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 1998
Would you know what to do if someone in your climbing party accidentally impaled himself with an ice ax? What if your tent mate were suffering from hypothermia? Let's say you've just pulled a friend, unconscious and bleeding, from a crevasse: What do you do next?Such incidents are not altogether uncommon. If you've ever flipped through the cautionary pages of the American Alpine Club's annual report, "Accidents in North American Mountaineering," you know that things can go horribly wrong in the mountains.
FEATURES
By Mary Forgione and Mary Forgione,Los Angeles Daily News | March 28, 1993
When "Out of Africa" won Best Picture and other Oscars in 1985, it was more than a cinematic triumph for the movie's producers: It sparked an explosion for tour operators."
FEATURES
By Jim Molnar and Jim Molnar,Seattle Times | May 9, 1993
There's such a wide variety of adventure programs available these days that travelers hardly know where to look.And since many of the best, offering more personal and customized service, are small operations that have virtually no marketing budgets, they can go unhailed except by word of mouth -- or through lucky mention in one or more of the increasing number of books being published about adventure and nature-oriented travel.Possibly the best general printed source for adventure-travel information is "The Ultimate Adventure Sourcebook," by Paul McMenamin ($29.
FEATURES
By Mike Steere and Mike Steere,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 1998
In 1967, tens of thousands of the young and idealistic converged on San Francisco, proclaiming the Summer of Love and doing everything they could to appall their elders and upend the status quo.That same year, a tiny group left San Francisco on a trip that would do for Americans' travel habits what the grand gathering of hippies did for the world. The wave the trip started would, in a quiet and gradual way, blow the mainstream travel establishment's mind, expanding the range and intensity of human experience, pushing back the limits of the possible.
FEATURES
By Charles Salter Jr. and Charles Salter Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Any minute now he's going to swagger into the offices of Christian Science Monitor Radio and this place isn't going to know what hit it. Just you wait.Gonzo travel writer Tim Cahill is dropping by to promote his book "Pass the Butterworms: Remote Journeys Oddly Rendered," a collection of his latest travel stories. What do you expect from a guy whose previous books included "Jaguars Ripped My Flesh" and "A Wolverine Is Eating My Leg"? His idea of travel is rappelling down the face of El Capitan, stalking gorillas in the Rwandan mountains, swimming in the North Pole and driving from Argentina to Alaska in 23 days, 22 hours and 43 minutes to secure his place in the "Guinness Book of Records."
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