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NEWS
April 17, 2014
I was surprised that Thomas F. Schaller didn't mention that some of us who "diligently pay the full monthly balance" on our credit cards receive rewards on some cards that can be redeemed as cash or applied to a balance ( "Paper or plastic?" April 16). There's much more to be said about convenience. Less frequent trips to the bank or the ATM to make sure I have enough cash on hand for any type of purchase suit me just fine. Garry Reck, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Even before they signed it, a handful of Major League Baseball owners expressed deep misgivings about a 2005 agreement negotiated by Orioles owner Peter Angelos establishing conditions under which the Montreal Expos would move and become the Washington Nationals. The owners, all members of baseball's executive council, sounded like customers having second thoughts after buying something from an aggressive salesman. They questioned whether Major League Baseball ceded too much to the Orioles for their agreement to share the club's exclusive television territory, according to the minutes of a March 28, 2005, conference call released last week as an exhibit in a court case.
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SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | March 7, 1993
Maybe the Washington Redskins can blame Bill Clinton.He came to Washington promising change, but this isn't the kind of change the Redskins had in mind. They liked the status quo.Since the start of the year, they've lost two of the major advantages that helped them win three Super Bowls in the past decade.On Jan. 6, the players and owners ended years of labor strife by reaching a settlement that includes a salary cap. It is triggered when revenue hits 67 percent of the designated gross revenue.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
Inside the Ravens' locker room late Sunday afternoon, rookie running back Lorenzo Taliaferro smiled and did his best to shrug off compliments from veteran teammates. Taliaferro, a fourth-round draft pick, rushed for a game-high 91 yards and a touchdown on 18 carries during a 23-21 victory over the Cleveland Browns. Those were Taliaferro's first NFL regular-season carries after primarily playing on special teams in the Ravens' first two games. Taliaferro provided a boost to a backfield that was missing starter Bernard Pierce because of a quadriceps injury and no longer has Ray Rice after his $35 million contract was terminated in the fallout from his domestic violence incident.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | July 7, 1999
Cheer up. Can't be more than eight more weeks of these temperatures, tops.Polls show conclusively that no one who filed in either party can be elected mayor of Baltimore this year.Benjamin Nathaniel Smith had all the advantages except humanity.Hillary Clinton is no New Yorker. Nor are all those folks bubbling over in outrage at her carpet-bagging.Pub Date: 7/07/99
NEWS
By DAVID W. BARTON Jr | December 8, 1993
Being a crybaby is hardly becoming to Baltimore. Worse, crying over losing a contest for an NFL football franchise wastes tears on the wrong object. A 26-to-2 vote sends a message. Apparently, Baltimore can't hear it.Baltimoreans seem fixed on the notion that an undeserving Jacksonville benefited from double-dealing by evil football-team owners. The real reason to cry, if Baltimoreans must, is that its city appears as ''a finished city,'' not a ''hot market'' or a citywith ''municipal passion.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | September 30, 1990
A survey published in Progressive Farmer magazine this summer showed that farmers find their family life extremely satisfying; three-quarters of those surveyed said their families consistently make them feel self-confident and good about themselves. The farmers named money and weather as their top problems; the advantages of farming included independence, freedom and the farm as a good place to bring up children. Among other traits listed in the survey as common to farm families: They are unusually optimistic and have a strong belief in God; they are very independent; and they value personal freedom.
FEATURES
By Jack Mathews and Jack Mathews,NEWSDAY | August 29, 1996
When Tom Hanks withdrew from the race for the Bill Clinton role in the film version of the satirical political novel "Primary Colors" a couple weeks ago, it was an act of singularly clearheaded thinking, for a movie star. However Hanks might have played the part, any time he affects a Southern accent, we will think of the innocent simpleton Forrest Gump. And, bubba, Bill Clinton is no Forrest Gump.With Hanks out of the running, who will fill the role of the fictional Jack Stanton, a 40-something Southern governor pressing -- and occasionally fondling -- the flesh during the 1992 Democratic primaries?
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | July 1, 1992
The leaders of the NFL expansion effort in Charlotte, N.C., are attempting to make a comeback by restructuring their stadium financing plan.Acknowledging that St. Louis and Baltimore are perceived to have an advantage because they have public funding to build stadiums, Charlotte officials hope to put a new financing plan in place in six to eight weeks."
FEATURES
By DEBORAH JACOBS and DEBORAH JACOBS,Chronicle Features | May 21, 1995
Sometimes we don't give enough thought to whether we will be happy working at a new job.One manager who was laid off accepted a position for which he was overqualified. At first the job looked like an interesting challenge, but it turned out that the company's goals were wildly unrealistic, and everyone who had ever held the job had either quit or been fired. In short order, the manager was back in the job market.To avoid a similar fate, ask yourself the questions listed below before you accept the next offer.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan jumped out to a massive - but almost certainly temporary - lead in cash in hand over Democratic rival Anthony G. Brown, the Hogan campaign reported Tuesday night. Hogan's better than 3-1 advantage - $2.4 million to Brown's $760,000 - was based largely on a July 9 lump sum payment of $2.6 million from the state's public financing fund after the June 24 primary. However, Hogan's fund-raising for his general election campaign is essentially frozen, while Brown can continue to raise money through the Nov. 4 election.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
If Republican Larry Hogan wants to be Maryland's next governor, he needs to drive home his message of cutting taxes and creating jobs. And he needs to appear pleasant. For his part, Democrat Anthony G. Brown needs to avoid unforced errors that could squander his advantages. And he can't underestimate his opponent. This is among the advice offered by political pundits and campaign veterans, many of whom expect a lively race for governor when the campaign for the Nov. 4 election moves into higher gear in the coming weeks.
BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2014
Bob Fireovid, a national program leader at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Beltsville, has been planning to retire in late September. But now that the Office of Personnel Management has finally released its long-awaited guidelines on phased retirement, the 63-year-old Greenbelt man might reconsider. Beginning in November, retirement-eligible federal employees may cut their hours to part time and begin drawing a portion of their pensions while sticking around to mentor their younger colleagues.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
The University of Maryland University College has long been at the forefront of online continuing education and job training for its mostly adult student body, so a recent proposal by UMUC President Javier Miyares to tie the school's future more closely to the private sector and adopt a learning model that lets students progress at their own pace seems like a natural evolution of the institution's history of innovation. The plan is still in the preliminary stages, with many details left to be worked out. But overall it could represent a way forward for an institution with a worldwide student body that has experienced declining enrollments, staff cuts and increased competition from for-profit schools in recent years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
For atmosphere alone, the new waterfront restaurant Barcocina is worth a visit. But you can't eat atmosphere. And the great news is that the food at Barcocina - pronounced bar-co-SEEN-ah, the name is a portmanteau word combining "bar" and "cocina," Spanish for "kitchen" - is excellent. The chef is Marc Dixon, who won praise for his work at Bistro Blanc in Glenelg, and he has fantastic ideas about how to make casual dining inventive, fun and memorable. The concept is tricky.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Ubaldo Jimenez still is searching for his first home win as an Oriole. The club's 4-0 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays on Friday dropped the right-hander to 2-8 this year, including 0-6 in seven games at Camden Yards. “One of these days, it's going to come,” Jimenez said. “It's not going to last forever that I don't have a win here.” Friday's start wasn't nearly as disastrous as some of Jimenez's other home appearances, which include three outings of five earned runs or more.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1998
President Clinton's proposed $1.73 trillion balanced budget may have created some heat in the halls of Congress, but the real estate industry is quietly boiling over the potential loss of some of its tax benefits.Under a proposal by the president last week to generate more tax revenue, publicly traded real estate investment trusts would undergo their most significant structural changes in more than a decade.Many industry analysts and executives fear that the proposed changes could represent only the beginning of a series of setbacks for the successful REIT industry, which has grown from a fledgling handful of companies with less than $10 billion in 1990 to more than 200 companies valued at $150 billion today.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | June 25, 2000
Consider it a fortunate accommodation, one of the true pleasures of life, that you have lived to actually see Tiger Woods strike a golf ball. It's an experience all unto itself. There has never been anything comparable to the length, accuracy and scoreboard results he's achieving. No need to study film clips, read dispatches from tournament sites, listen to what contemporary players, or golden heroes of the past, are saying about a young man of 24 whose ability has surpassed the intense examinations that golf offers to anyone, adult or adolescent who picks up a club and takes aim at the flagstick.
NEWS
By Benjamin Todd Jealous | June 12, 2014
Early voting starts today in Maryland. As citizens across the state head to the ballot box, it is an appropriate time to reflect on everything that Maryland has done in the past few years to make it easier to vote, while so many other states around the country are making it harder.  The stakes for voting rights have never been higher. Last year, the Supreme Court struck down Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, accelerating efforts in at least 19 states to restrict the right to vote.
SPORTS
By Aaron Dodson and The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
In bold black letters across the back of Calloway Lee's Catonsville High wrestling hoodie are two words: Bone Crusher. Take a quick glance at the senior heavyweight wrestler's 5-foot-9, 220-pound frame and couple that with his accolades as the captain and MVP of the Comets' football and wrestling teams, and the nickname is warranted. But ask those around Lee, and they have different words for him. Once that hoodie comes off, the real Calloway Lee - one they say always puts others before himself - takes to the field or mat. "I think he's probably one of the most caring athletes I've been around," Catonsville football coach Rich Hambor said of Lee, who plays defensive line and running back.
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