Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAdvanced Placement
IN THE NEWS

Advanced Placement

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 16, 2013
As long-time advocates for public education in Baltimore County, we felt compelled to respond to letter writer Harry J. Cook's view of the Advanced Placement exams (" A different perspective on AP courses Sept. 6). While we're grateful that magnet schools such as Eastern Technical High School offer quality programs, it's unrealistic to compare this selective, quasi-private school with most county comprehensive high schools. Despite its name, Eastern Tech is far from the vocational-technical school of old. Its pre-engineering, pre-law and technology programs are designed for highly motivated, capable students and require a rigorous application and assessment process.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Three years ago, no student at Milford Mill Academy passed the Advanced Placement calculus exam, which made it clear that unprepared students were being pushed into the high-level class. In an attempt to change that, a dozen high school students who have signed up for AP calculus at the Baltimore County school are honing their math skills at a boot camp this week and next. And they'll get extra help on Saturdays during the school year. Tekiah Hanks, a 16-year-old who might have been picking fruit or sleeping late on Thursday morning, said she has no regrets about the summer hours she has committed to solving math problems.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1996
Baltimore County's public high school students posted a 67 hTC percent pass rate on advanced placement tests last year, a slight decline that continued a three-year downward trend.The passing rate -- down from 68 percent in 1994-1995 and 80 percent three years ago, trailed the statewide rate.Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione said he is not pleased with the trend -- matched by a similar slide in Scholastic Assessment Test scores in recent years. Test scores are viewed by parents, business leaders, developers and homebuyers as a barometer of the health of a school district.
NEWS
BY KRISHANA DAVIS, kdavis@baltsun.com | June 27, 2014
Over the last six years, enrollment in Advance Placement testing across Harford County Public Schools has increased, but that increase has not necessarily translated into more students passing the exams. Students who pass Advanced Placement exams are afforded by many colleges and universities the option of skipping a comparable college level course, or receiving college credit for the course or both, so AP programs are often regarded as giving college-bound high school students a jump on collegiate academics.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Three years ago, no student at Milford Mill Academy passed the Advanced Placement calculus exam, which made it clear that unprepared students were being pushed into the high-level class. In an attempt to change that, a dozen high school students who have signed up for AP calculus at the Baltimore County school are honing their math skills at a boot camp this week and next. And they'll get extra help on Saturdays during the school year. Tekiah Hanks, a 16-year-old who might have been picking fruit or sleeping late on Thursday morning, said she has no regrets about the summer hours she has committed to solving math problems.
NEWS
August 2, 1993
HCC professor chosen to read, score AP examsDr. Grace E. Collins, associate professor of English at Howard Community College, was selected to participate in the annual reading and scoring of Advanced Placement Examinations in English held in June in San Antonio, Texas.The AP Program, sponsored by the College Board, gives high school students the opportunity to take rigorous college-level courses. Based on their examination performance, students then receive credit or advanced placement when entering college.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
For the fourth year in a row, Maryland ranked No. 1 in the nation in the percentage of its graduating seniors who successfully passed the rigorous Advanced Placement exams, leaping further ahead of other top states. Twenty-nine percent of last year's graduating seniors in Maryland had passed one AP test by the time they walked across the stage last spring, double the percentage of a decade ago and more than one percentage point higher than 2010. The national average was 18 percent.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
If there is one thing Katie Boltz has mastered in high school, it is how to use every minute of her day efficiently. With five Advanced Placement classes, the Dulaney High School senior doesn't text her friends or watch TV so she can focus on homework - but still only manages three or four hours of sleep some nights. "Originally, I thought I would really like all of these classes," the 17-year-old said, adding that when she is overwhelmed, she questions the decision to take so many demanding classes at one time.
EXPLORE
March 6, 2012
Editor: It is indeed welcome news that the Harford County Public Schools, on the initiative of Superintendent Dr. Robert Tomback plans to fortify the offerings of advanced placement courses to students (As noted in The Aegis editorial, "Cause for concern" published Feb.17) but one has to wonder if we have seen this pattern before. In Harford County Public Schools, a positive public relations pitch drives almost everything and reports of increased AP enrollment is seen as a positive public relations tool for the local school system.
NEWS
February 17, 2012
After reading your editorial on the achievement gap in Advanced Placement test scores, I was amazed that you focused on family income and wealth as causes of the disparity ("The AP achievement gap," Feb. 14). As one who taught math in both Pikeville and Randallstown high schools, I observed that the biggest differences in students' level of accomplishment were more dependent on their efforts to learn than on their financial status. I think you should put more emphasis on the need for students to focus on their studies rather than on social activities in high school.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When John Crosby takes his final exams this week, it will be a lot like playing "Jeopardy. " Every question could be the one that costs the Polytechnic Institute senior thousands of dollars. The basketball player has 20 potential athletic scholarships, totaling more than $1 million, riding on his final exams, which he must score well on to maintain his GPA and choose from universities like Cornell and Xavier. It's a daunting task at the rigorous Poly — made even more difficult by a citywide policy that gives less weight to grades in Advanced Placement and honors courses than any other school district in the Baltimore region.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
The Maryland State Board of Education took steps Tuesday to amend the new requirement that students take four years of math during high school. In 2013, the Maryland General Assembly passed a law requiring students to take a math class for each year they are in high school, beginning with those entering as freshmen in the fall of 2014. However, a small percentage of students — about 2.5 percent statewide — take five years to graduate. Those on the five-year graduation track won't have to take a fifth year of math, the state board decided on Tuesday when it voted to publish a new regulation.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
It was an uncommon partnership for a Maryland school and an aerospace company. In 2012, Boeing agreed to pump hundreds of thousands of dollars into one Harford County high school to improve Advanced Placement achievement in hopes that students - many the children of military and defense contracting families - would pursue science and math courses in college. Aberdeen High School teachers and students were paid $100 for every passing score on an Advanced Placement test.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | February 3, 2014
   Laurence E. Block, a retired Broad Neck High School teacher, responds in this post to the Advanced Placement story that raised questions about an educational system that puts pressure on top students to overload on AP.   By Laurence E. Block I have always been amused when I hear comments that describe AP courses as "college equivalent. "  What colleges are they referring to?  Yale, Duke, and Stanford or Muddy River State?  To suggest that the typical AP course taught by the typical high school teacher is an educational experience equivalent to that offered at our nation's most distinguished colleges is ludicrous.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
With more than 60 percent of Dulaney High's seniors taking tough college-level Advanced Placement classes, their principal has fewer worries about achievement than most administrators. Instead, she worries about students taking too many difficult classes. So as Baltimore County prepares to change high school schedules in the fall to allow students to sign up for one more class a semester, Lynda Whitlock recently decided to enact a policy that ensures students fully consider the consequences before they take more AP classes.
NEWS
January 25, 2014
While I appreciate letter writer Linda Jacobs' position regarding Advanced Placement courses, for her to call them foolishness is excessive and lacks any appreciation of what the purpose of an AP course is ( "AP courses don't equal education," Jan. 22). The purpose of an AP course is to prepare a student for an AP exam. However, you don't have to take an AP course to take that exam, although it is recommended. Different colleges have different standards for accepting AP credits.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
The Maryland State Board of Education took steps Tuesday to amend the new requirement that students take four years of math during high school. In 2013, the Maryland General Assembly passed a law requiring students to take a math class for each year they are in high school, beginning with those entering as freshmen in the fall of 2014. However, a small percentage of students — about 2.5 percent statewide — take five years to graduate. Those on the five-year graduation track won't have to take a fifth year of math, the state board decided on Tuesday when it voted to publish a new regulation.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
With more than 60 percent of Dulaney High's seniors taking tough college-level Advanced Placement classes, their principal has fewer worries about achievement than most administrators. Instead, she worries about students taking too many difficult classes. So as Baltimore County prepares to change high school schedules in the fall to allow students to sign up for one more class a semester, Lynda Whitlock recently decided to enact a policy that ensures students fully consider the consequences before they take more AP classes.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
If there is one thing Katie Boltz has mastered in high school, it is how to use every minute of her day efficiently. With five Advanced Placement classes, the Dulaney High School senior doesn't text her friends or watch TV so she can focus on homework - but still only manages three or four hours of sleep some nights. "Originally, I thought I would really like all of these classes," the 17-year-old said, adding that when she is overwhelmed, she questions the decision to take so many demanding classes at one time.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | December 5, 2013
Helen Gao is one of only 12 students in the world to earn a perfect score on the Advanced Placement Macro Economics test this past May. The 18-year-old Princeton University freshman graduated from Dulaney High School in Baltimore County last June and says she is considering majoring in economics. The College Board recently notified Dulaney and Gao's parents of her accomplishment.   "She is very humble young lady," said Phil Bressler, who taught her economics at Dulaney. To earn every point on the test, she had to answer 60 multiple choice questions correctly, as well as earn the maximum scores possible in the free-response section of the exam.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.