Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAdvance Directives
IN THE NEWS

Advance Directives

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By PHYLLIS FLOWERS AND PHYLLIS LUCAS | January 3, 1995
Our first column of the new year always feels like a new beginning. The Southview Regional Shopping Center also is having a new beginning. The center has a bright new green facade, new roofs with brick columns and a repaved parking lot. Young and old neighbors are thrilled with the fancy new look.The center's long renovation has been a rough time for many of us. However, neighbors throughout the community will agree the renovation has been a long time coming and is well worth putting up with the inconveniences.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Dan Morhaim | June 5, 2012
It's every parent's worst nightmare: the call that comes in the middle of the night or interrupts a workday. It's the police or hospital calling to say that your child is in critical condition. As an emergency medicine physician, sometimes I have been the one to break such news, and it never gets easier. Two years ago, a good friend received that call. A car accident had left her teenage son brain dead. At the heartbreaking memorial service, my friend shared the bittersweet comfort she and her family derived knowing that a part of her son lived on in the many people he helped through the donation of his organs.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 2, 1991
Thanks to a new federal law, adult Americans will now get a timely reminder of their rights when they are admitted to health care institutions. The federal Patient Self-Determination Act, which went into effect Dec. 1, stipulates that all patients be told about the provisions their state makes for living wills and other advance directives in case they become unable to make decisions about their own medical care.In recent years, medical technology has rapidly increased the number of tough life-and-death decisions that must be made each day in health care institutions.
NEWS
April 11, 2010
Youth art contest Laurel Regional Hospital and the Laurel Art Guild will host a youth art contest open to children ages 5 to 18. This year's theme is "Family Fun." One entry per contestant and the first 100 entries will be judged. Entry applications are available at the hospital's public relations office or visitor information desk. All entries must be hand-delivered to the hospital's public relation office, 7300 Van Dusen Road, Laurel by May 28. The first place winner in each age category wins $100.
NEWS
February 21, 1994
Only a year ago, the General Assembly enacted a comprehensive Health Care Decisions Act governing the ways in which Marylanders can register their preferences about life-prolonging medical treatment. The law went into effect Oct. 1, less than five months ago, but already there is a bill in the state Senate that would reverse the thrust of that policy by imposing restrictions on advance directives. Sponsored by Sen. John A. Cade, R-Anne Arundel, the bill will receive a hearing this week in the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee.
NEWS
By Cynthia Kammann and Cynthia Kammann,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 1998
I ATTENDED a presentation about guardianship this week, assuming it had something to do with elderly people being adopted by their families.I was, of course, way off, and learned a lot from Wanda Nason-Raleigh, guardianship director for the county's Department of Aging, who introduced the topic to 36 senior citizens at the Brooklyn Park Senior Nutrition Site.Brooklyn Park resident Joseph Siemer acknowledged that, like me, he hadn't thought much about guardianship before the presentation."It's good to let people know because a lot of them are in the dark and it's good to know your options," he said.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | October 1, 1993
Starting today, everyone in Maryland can make a real life-and-death decision.A law goes into effect today allowing people to decide whether they should be kept alive by life-support systems or allowed to die if sickness or injury prevents them from making the decision themselves."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff writer | January 3, 1992
Elizabeth Sosnowski had heard about living wills, but the 56-year-old Severna Park woman didn't decide to look into one until her husbandwas rushed to the hospital Dec. 11 for an apparent heart attack.After her husband was transferred from the emergency room to the intensive care unit -- it turned out he had heart problems but had not had a heart attack -- he was presented a pamphlet titled, "Exercise Your Right: Put Your Health Care Decisions in Writing."Distributing the pamphlet is the way the Harbor Hospital Center in South Baltimore is complying with a new federal law. The Patient Self-Determination Act, which went into effect Dec. 1, requires that patients entering hospitals and other health-care facilities be informed of their rights to refuse medical treatment.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Universal Press Syndicate | December 9, 1991
Since 1938, under one name or another, the Society for the Right to Die has worked through the legislative and judicial processes to ensure that Americans could refuse medical treatment that would prolong their lives against their will.In 1967, the Euthanasia Educational Fund later to become Concern for Dying was founded to educate Americans about end-of-life choices that were already facing increasing numbers of people.In recent years, the two groups have worked side by side separate organizations tackling different aspects of their common cause of helping Americans come to grips with life-and-death decisions about medical care.
NEWS
April 11, 2010
Youth art contest Laurel Regional Hospital and the Laurel Art Guild will host a youth art contest open to children ages 5 to 18. This year's theme is "Family Fun." One entry per contestant and the first 100 entries will be judged. Entry applications are available at the hospital's public relations office or visitor information desk. All entries must be hand-delivered to the hospital's public relation office, 7300 Van Dusen Road, Laurel by May 28. The first place winner in each age category wins $100.
NEWS
April 22, 2005
Bishop and Mfume to speak April 30 at interfaith breakfast The women's ministry of St. John Baptist Church will hold an interfaith breakfast at 8:30 a.m. April 30 at Ten Oaks Ballroom, 5000 Signal Bell Lane, Clarksville. The theme of the breakfast is "Many Minds, One Spirit." Bishop Vashti Murphy McKenzie will be the keynote speaker. She will be introduced by Kweisi Mfume, former head of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and a candidate for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Maryland's Paul S. Sarbanes.
NEWS
By Cynthia Kammann and Cynthia Kammann,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 1998
I ATTENDED a presentation about guardianship this week, assuming it had something to do with elderly people being adopted by their families.I was, of course, way off, and learned a lot from Wanda Nason-Raleigh, guardianship director for the county's Department of Aging, who introduced the topic to 36 senior citizens at the Brooklyn Park Senior Nutrition Site.Brooklyn Park resident Joseph Siemer acknowledged that, like me, he hadn't thought much about guardianship before the presentation."It's good to let people know because a lot of them are in the dark and it's good to know your options," he said.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 2, 1996
WALNUT CREEK, Calif. -- The woman who putters in the garden at the blue stucco house is bony and frail, with a soft handshake and wide blue eyes. She brings to mind a character from a Tennessee Williams play -- delicate, ethereal, immersed in a world of her own.Linda Schneider's mind is slipping away; a rare genetic disorder is eating at her brain. Her conversation is like water rolling across a tabletop -- elusive, hard to grasp. Her memory dances in and out of reality.Not so long ago, this 49-year-old woman was active and vibrant, a dental hygienist and part-time travel agent.
NEWS
By PHYLLIS FLOWERS AND PHYLLIS LUCAS | January 3, 1995
Our first column of the new year always feels like a new beginning. The Southview Regional Shopping Center also is having a new beginning. The center has a bright new green facade, new roofs with brick columns and a repaved parking lot. Young and old neighbors are thrilled with the fancy new look.The center's long renovation has been a rough time for many of us. However, neighbors throughout the community will agree the renovation has been a long time coming and is well worth putting up with the inconveniences.
NEWS
February 21, 1994
Only a year ago, the General Assembly enacted a comprehensive Health Care Decisions Act governing the ways in which Marylanders can register their preferences about life-prolonging medical treatment. The law went into effect Oct. 1, less than five months ago, but already there is a bill in the state Senate that would reverse the thrust of that policy by imposing restrictions on advance directives. Sponsored by Sen. John A. Cade, R-Anne Arundel, the bill will receive a hearing this week in the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee.
NEWS
October 8, 1993
"Living wills," documents expressing in advance a person's wishes about life-prolonging treatments, were first authorized in California in the mid-1970s and later spread across the country. But now, almost two decades later, only about 20 percent of Americans have written a living will or appointed a health care agent to make those decisions for them.Clearly, this society urgently needs other ways of making life-and-death choices for people unable to make those decisions themselves. The Health Care Decision Act, which took effect last Friday, puts Maryland in the forefront of states that have given serious thought and attention to the tangle of ethical and legal issues surrounding the ways increasing numbers of Americans die.The new law is the product of a lengthy and wide-ranging discussion among representatives of the medical, legal and religious communities, hospitals, nursing homes and legislators.
NEWS
October 8, 1993
"Living wills," documents expressing in advance a person's wishes about life-prolonging treatments, were first authorized in California in the mid-1970s and later spread across the country. But now, almost two decades later, only about 20 percent of Americans have written a living will or appointed a health care agent to make those decisions for them.Clearly, this society urgently needs other ways of making life-and-death choices for people unable to make those decisions themselves. The Health Care Decision Act, which took effect last Friday, puts Maryland in the forefront of states that have given serious thought and attention to the tangle of ethical and legal issues surrounding the ways increasing numbers of Americans die.The new law is the product of a lengthy and wide-ranging discussion among representatives of the medical, legal and religious communities, hospitals, nursing homes and legislators.
NEWS
October 5, 1993
It's never easy facing choices about life and death. But increasing numbers of Americans are encountering the singular anguish of deciding whether to remove life support equipment from a relative or to stop artificially administering the essential nutrients. This month Maryland joined the front ranks of states grappling in a comprehensive way with the choices that face families and with how those choices should be made.Maryland's Health Care Decision Act, which took effect Oct. 1, updates the state's laws on advance directives -- documents that allow people to state in advance their wishes about life-prolonging medical treatment.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.