Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAdulthood
IN THE NEWS

Adulthood

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
Stephen B. Awalt | May 15, 2014
Over the next few weeks, graduation gowns will be discarded for shorts, bikinis and sandals as local high school graduates swarm Ocean City for their annual spring rites. Some will stay on for the summer as waitresses or busboys, others staffing the candy stores and French-fry stands along the boardwalk. A few dozen others will bear late May's cold water and waves and try out for the Ocean City Beach Patrol, as I did 37 years ago. When I graduated from high school in the mid-1970s, the political upheavals of the late '60s and early '70s were behind us, and my friends and I wandered through life without the calling or purpose of our immediate predecessors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Stephen B. Awalt | May 15, 2014
Over the next few weeks, graduation gowns will be discarded for shorts, bikinis and sandals as local high school graduates swarm Ocean City for their annual spring rites. Some will stay on for the summer as waitresses or busboys, others staffing the candy stores and French-fry stands along the boardwalk. A few dozen others will bear late May's cold water and waves and try out for the Ocean City Beach Patrol, as I did 37 years ago. When I graduated from high school in the mid-1970s, the political upheavals of the late '60s and early '70s were behind us, and my friends and I wandered through life without the calling or purpose of our immediate predecessors.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Rafer Guzman and Rafer Guzman,Newsday | July 19, 2007
For some children of the '80s, the era of sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll ended with the arrival of the somber '90s, and the steady advance of adulthood and responsibility. Others, however, kept on partying. On TV Rock of Love with Bret Michaels airs Sundays at 10 p.m. on VH1.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
Does the Boy Scouts of America realize that the gay youths they are now "allowing" in are going to grow up to be gay adults ("After months of debate, Boy Scouts' ban on openly gay youth lifted," May 23)? They're not going to switch orientations once they reach adulthood. What happens to them then if they want to continue their life in Scouts - possibly as a leader? They call this a step in the right direction? Wow. So, if I understand this resolution correctly, they are no longer discriminating against "openly gay youths" but continue to discriminate against gay adults?
NEWS
August 31, 2012
Thanks for Susan Reimer 's excellent column on the Perry Hall High School shooter's background ("Failing Bobby," Aug. 30). This was such a tragedy. The greater tragedy is that this young boy has been charged as an adult. Our society lacks humanity when it comes to our children. Rather than more metal detectors, let's provide resources to nurture and foster all our children on their path to adulthood. Lissa Abrams
NEWS
March 4, 2010
To say that I am disappointed to hear that Cardinal Gibbons School is closing is an understatement ("Disbelief, outrage in face of Gibbons' closing," Mar. 4). I am writing you this e-mail because I believe that the true Gibbons spirit and the quality of Catholic men that Gibbons produces are the very essence of what is at stake with Gibbons' closure. I believe that it is a moral wrong to deprive society of the types of men who would receive a Catholic education, specifically from Cardinal Gibbons.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
Does the Boy Scouts of America realize that the gay youths they are now "allowing" in are going to grow up to be gay adults ("After months of debate, Boy Scouts' ban on openly gay youth lifted," May 23)? They're not going to switch orientations once they reach adulthood. What happens to them then if they want to continue their life in Scouts - possibly as a leader? They call this a step in the right direction? Wow. So, if I understand this resolution correctly, they are no longer discriminating against "openly gay youths" but continue to discriminate against gay adults?
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 30, 2010
A recent New York Times Magazine story describing the 20s not only as a decade of growth and exploration but a full-fledged "life stage," like infancy or adolescence, has children and their parents churning with reactions ranging from "I told you so" to "harrumph. " Robin Marantz Henig described 20-somethings, so many of whom are not finding traction in education, work or romance, as not merely adrift but as butterflies in the cocoon stage. This slouching toward adulthood is not a function of self-indulgent parents and a weak economy, she writes.
NEWS
June 9, 1994
For all the fears and unknowns harbored by high school seniors -- finding a job, getting into college, carving a path into adulthood -- mortality is typically low on the list. Invincibility is as much a part of teenhood as battling acne.So the lesson in tenacity that Cindy M. Gibson taught her classmates at Brunswick High School in Frederick County was one they never bargained for. And their uplifting response, supported by their community, is an ideal worth clinging to.Ms. Gibson, 18, died of AIDS last Saturday, two days before her school's graduation.
NEWS
By Judith M. Dobler | January 17, 1991
BIRDS instinctively know when and how to encourage their fledglings to leave the next. Humans don't. The rites of passage we do have -- religious ceremonies like bar mitzvahs and confirmations, even obtaining drivers' licenses and jobs and credit cards -- occur far too early in children's lives for parents to be comfortable.My students are returning this week from visiting their family homes for the holiday break. Many have already complained that the nest just isn't the same: Younger siblings have encroached on their territory, and parents persist in treating them like the children they used to be.Parents, too, have felt discomfort.
NEWS
August 31, 2012
Thanks for Susan Reimer 's excellent column on the Perry Hall High School shooter's background ("Failing Bobby," Aug. 30). This was such a tragedy. The greater tragedy is that this young boy has been charged as an adult. Our society lacks humanity when it comes to our children. Rather than more metal detectors, let's provide resources to nurture and foster all our children on their path to adulthood. Lissa Abrams
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2011
Elizabeth Taylor, who died early Wednesday morning of congestive heart failure at age 79, did something no other actor ever did. At every stage of her career she became a superstar all over again. As a magical little girl, a pristine ingénue and a voluptuous woman, she created characters and images that enraptured or fascinated international audiences. In the second half of the 20th century, no other Hollywood-bred celebrity was as frequently photographed, celebrated or vilified. Her eight marriages — including a couple to Richard Burton — landed her in headlines and altered her persona.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 30, 2010
A recent New York Times Magazine story describing the 20s not only as a decade of growth and exploration but a full-fledged "life stage," like infancy or adolescence, has children and their parents churning with reactions ranging from "I told you so" to "harrumph. " Robin Marantz Henig described 20-somethings, so many of whom are not finding traction in education, work or romance, as not merely adrift but as butterflies in the cocoon stage. This slouching toward adulthood is not a function of self-indulgent parents and a weak economy, she writes.
NEWS
March 4, 2010
To say that I am disappointed to hear that Cardinal Gibbons School is closing is an understatement ("Disbelief, outrage in face of Gibbons' closing," Mar. 4). I am writing you this e-mail because I believe that the true Gibbons spirit and the quality of Catholic men that Gibbons produces are the very essence of what is at stake with Gibbons' closure. I believe that it is a moral wrong to deprive society of the types of men who would receive a Catholic education, specifically from Cardinal Gibbons.
NEWS
February 26, 2010
Unfortunately, it is during times of tragedy that the brightest light is shone on the shortcomings of our systems. The death of Hanna Wheeling, a teacher at the Cheltenham Youth Facility, is such a tragedy. As we scramble for answers to our numerous unanswered questions, we must not lose focus on what works to put children and youth in the juvenile justice system back on the right path to productive adolescence and adulthood. We must stand on the decades of research that supports evidence-based services such as Multi-Systemic Therapy and Functional Family Therapy for those youth who are able to remain safely in the community and intensive rehabilitative treatment and aftercare modeled after the nationally recognized Missouri model for those youth needing residential placement.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow and Marc Freedman | January 12, 2010
America faces many deficits - in federal and state budgets, in trade, in business and, most assuredly, in personal finance. But there is one very large deficit that may underlie all of them. We face a "posterity deficit," born out of our growing failure to think about the well-being of future generations. Most people are not much concerned with what lies ahead for the world beyond their lifetimes. Yet, decisions we make today on questions like the environment and spending will have far-ranging implications on the lives of future generations - for better or worse.
NEWS
February 26, 2010
Unfortunately, it is during times of tragedy that the brightest light is shone on the shortcomings of our systems. The death of Hanna Wheeling, a teacher at the Cheltenham Youth Facility, is such a tragedy. As we scramble for answers to our numerous unanswered questions, we must not lose focus on what works to put children and youth in the juvenile justice system back on the right path to productive adolescence and adulthood. We must stand on the decades of research that supports evidence-based services such as Multi-Systemic Therapy and Functional Family Therapy for those youth who are able to remain safely in the community and intensive rehabilitative treatment and aftercare modeled after the nationally recognized Missouri model for those youth needing residential placement.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | February 20, 2005
MEL LEVINE has been a pediatrician for more than 30 years, and in that time he has watched some of his toddlers take their first, unsteady steps into adulthood. Not only are these children remarkably unprepared to be grown-ups, he has concluded, but their parents and teachers have actually made it more difficult. In his new book Ready or Not, Here Life Comes (Simon & Schuster, $26), he paints a picture of these unfocused, unsettled and ill-equipped twentysomethings wandering aimlessly on the employment landscape.
NEWS
By Eric Adler and Eric Adler , McClatchy-Tribune | December 7, 2009
Each year, tens of thousands of children diagnosed with autism, from mild to severe, enter adulthood and leave the safe confines of schools and their services behind. Every day, their parents, such as Jennifer Smith-Currier of Gardner, Kan., worry what will become of them. "It's like, where is the journey going?" said Smith-Currier, whose children Corinne, 16, and Cameron, 14, have autism. "When you have a typical child, there are goals: You go to high school; you go to college; you have a career and 2.5 children.
NEWS
By Susan Heslinga | July 29, 2008
Anyone coordinated enough to lick his or her own elbow possesses a rare gift, like being able to hum and whistle at the same time. Kids shamelessly try to do it - as soon as you tell them most people can't. Yet the only time adults usually try is on or around the Fourth of July, when the watermelon is so ripe that the juice pools in the crevice of your thumbs, slides coolly down your forearms and beads on your elbows. It awakens something in us, that tickle of fruit sap. Consider the taste of summer's yellow cling peaches: No matter how far you lean over the sink to catch the nectar, you still end up with it slavering into your collar and down to your elbow - just out of range of your tongue.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.