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NEWS
May 14, 1991
More than 300 local residents gathered Thursday night at Severna Park High School to see the works of art and crafts created by adult students in the Continuing Education program of the Anne Arundel County Public Schools.The fourth annual Artists' Festival provided opportunities for novices and advanced students to compete, display their works and share experiences with colleagues and teachers.For many students, enrolling in a continuing education class has allowed them to try their hands at learning a skill they've wanted totry for a long time, said adult education administrators.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Anne Arundel Community College officials say that for some prospective students, particularly adults who have spent years away from a formal classroom setting, the stresses of school begin well before enrollment. The school will hold an open house next month called "College 101" to help ease anxieties for adults looking to begin long-delayed goals to attend college or those who are returning to the classroom. The program will be offered at the school's Arundel Mills campus in Hanover on Aug. 3 and at its main campus in Arnold on Aug. 6. "The program was initiated because many adults have been away from school for many years," said Frances Turcott, director of AACC's Off-Site and Weekend College.
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NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | October 1, 1990
Because an estimated 65 percent of University of Maryland students will be age 25 or older by the year 2000, more college classes should be tailored to work schedules and some should be made "informal," the UM Board of Regents is being advised in a report.A 15-page report on the needs of adult and part-time students was presented to the regents at their monthly meeting last week. It suggests that each of the 11 UM institutions should analyze enrollment data, develop profiles of adult and part-time students and establish a liaison between the institutions and nearby community colleges to avoid duplication of courses.
NEWS
November 5, 2006
Transition planning for special-ed parents The Office of Special Education of Howard County schools will hold a Transition Planning Evening for parents of students receiving special-education services. The meeting is to be held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Nov. 14 at Oakland Mills High School, 9410 Kilimanjaro Road, Columbia. Parents and guardians will receive information about options available to their students when they leave school. Parents of students ages 14 or older who may receive a certificate upon graduation from high school are especially encouraged to attend.
NEWS
By Nancy Knisley and Nancy Knisley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 2000
Motivated by mission and market, colleges and universities are launching an increasing number of satellite sites to accommodate and attract working adult students. Loyola College, the Johns Hopkins University, the University of Maryland and others offer off-campus programs aimed at those seeking undergraduate degrees, professionals in need of continuing-education credits and people looking to switch careers. "It's increasingly evident that additional education past high school will have profound effect on earnings ability," said David L. Warren, president of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1989 Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 21, 1991
If you are an adult 25 or more years old who never earned college degree, it's highly likely you'll still seek a degree or additional education in the future. Millions of you are doing it now, confounding those who predicted sharp slumps in college enrollments. Despite the shrinking number of high school graduates, the college population keeps increasing.What's happening? Increasingly, adults who dropped out of college are returning to the campus. Those who went to work, got married or entered the military after high school now want the education they missed, says Carol B. Aslanian, director of the Office of Adult Learning Services at the College Board.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
Hidden among the trees and rolling hills of Columbia lies the Maryland branch of the University of Phoenix - a campus with no athletic complexes or voluminous libraries. Entirely within the first floor of a four-story office building in Columbia Corporate Park, the university looks more like a high-profile corporation than an institution of higher learning. But its businesslike appearance is perfect for the kind of students it targets: employed adults looking to enhance their resumes with a bachelor's or master's degree in business.
NEWS
October 29, 2006
Honoring adult high school grads Howard Community College will hold its 22nd annual graduation ceremony to recognize adult students who have earned a Maryland high school diploma in the past year through the college's Adult Basic Education programs. The ceremony is to be held at 3 p.m. Nov. 5 in the college's Smith Theatre, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. A reception for the graduates, their friends and families will be held after the ceremony in the Kittleman Room of the English, Language and Business Building (ELB-1090)
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
Hidden among the trees and rolling hills of Columbia lies the Maryland branch of the University of Phoenix - a campus with no athletic complexes or voluminous libraries. Entirely within the first floor of a four-story office building in Columbia Corporate Park, the university looks more like a high-profile corporation than an institute of higher learning. But its businesslike appearance is perfect for the kind of students it targets: employed adults looking to enhance their resumes with a bachelor's or master's degree in business.
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and By Melody Holmes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2001
A record number of new students and a stable base of returning students signing up for classes at Carroll Community College have propelled the school to its highest enrollment, college officials said. This fall, 2,634 students enrolled in classes at the Westminster college, marking a 5.9 percent increase over last year and beating 10-year projections from the Maryland Higher Education Commission. College officials were particularly upbeat about the large number of students new to the college.
NEWS
By Grant Huang and Grant Huang,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2005
After a 2 1/2 -year struggle that included a court case against its construction by local residents, Sojourner-Douglass College is finally opening its new, high-tech campus in Edgewater. The college, headquartered in Baltimore, has had an Annapolis location for nearly 10 years, but school officials say the student body has outgrown the old facility, which consisted of a single floor in an office building on Old Solomons Island Road. That facility is now closed, and its staff has moved to the new campus, where classes are scheduled to start Monday.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 2003
After 30 years as a nurse, Carolyn Eddington finally is getting her bachelor of science in nursing degree. The motivating factor for her was the accelerated program offered for the first time this year by the College of Notre Dame. The program will let Eddington, 47, earn her degree in 2 1/2 years through Thursday morning classes, many taught at Good Samaritan Hospital in Baltimore, where she is a nurse. In addition, as long as Eddington keeps a C average, Good Samaritan will pay most of her tuition costs.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 2003
Since the terrorism that struck New York City and the Pentagon on 9/11, it has often been said that people have paid more attention to what it is they really want to do in life. And that, say some horse people, has meant more work for quiet horses such as Thunder, a staid 20-year-old thoroughbred at Columbia Horse Center who has seen an increased workload carrying adults taking riding lessons. "It's a dream," said Nanci Steveson, general manager of Columbia Horse Center, referring to many of her adult students who never learned to ride a horse despite childhood dreams nurtured by reading such classics as The Black Stallion and Black Beauty.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2003
As a human resources supervisor for the Municipal Employees Credit Union of Baltimore, Sonja Crosby promotes higher education for her employees. But when the she heard about the University of Phoenix's Columbia campus, Crosby had a particular employee in mind: herself. After visiting the school, she thought, "This might be for me." Crosby graduated in June with a master's degree in organizational management. Calling itself the largest private university in the United States, Phoenix targets working adults.
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and By Melody Holmes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2001
A record number of new students and a stable base of returning students signing up for classes at Carroll Community College have propelled the school to its highest enrollment, college officials said. This fall, 2,634 students enrolled in classes at the Westminster college, marking a 5.9 percent increase over last year and beating 10-year projections from the Maryland Higher Education Commission. College officials were particularly upbeat about the large number of students new to the college.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
Hidden among the trees and rolling hills of Columbia lies the Maryland branch of the University of Phoenix - a campus with no athletic complexes or voluminous libraries. Entirely within the first floor of a four-story office building in Columbia Corporate Park, the university looks more like a high-profile corporation than an institute of higher learning. But its businesslike appearance is perfect for the kind of students it targets: employed adults looking to enhance their resumes with a bachelor's or master's degree in business.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Anne Arundel Community College officials say that for some prospective students, particularly adults who have spent years away from a formal classroom setting, the stresses of school begin well before enrollment. The school will hold an open house next month called "College 101" to help ease anxieties for adults looking to begin long-delayed goals to attend college or those who are returning to the classroom. The program will be offered at the school's Arundel Mills campus in Hanover on Aug. 3 and at its main campus in Arnold on Aug. 6. "The program was initiated because many adults have been away from school for many years," said Frances Turcott, director of AACC's Off-Site and Weekend College.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2000
Hidden among the trees and rolling hills of Columbia lies the Maryland branch of the University of Phoenix - a campus with no athletic complexes or voluminous libraries. Entirely within the first floor of a four-story office building in Columbia Corporate Park, the university looks more like a high-profile corporation than an institution of higher learning. But its businesslike appearance is perfect for the kind of students it targets: employed adults looking to enhance their resumes with a bachelor's or master's degree in business.
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