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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | October 8, 1993
A Baltimore judge yesterday signed an order delaying until December enforcement of most elements of a new city law passed to regulate adult entertainment businesses on The Block.The East Baltimore Street Merchants Association, a group of more than 20 owner/operators of adult entertainment businesses on or near The Block, challenged the constitutionality of several elements of the law in a suit filed yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court.The law requires owners of adult entertainment businesses to obtain a new type of license from the city housing department and to operate only between 6 p.m. and 2 a.m. It also would restrict "barkers" that have traditionally stationed themselves outside of the businesses' open doors.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
The city's adult strip known as The Block, as seedy as it is historic, is, if nothing else a survivor. Civic leaders long ago erased references to the entertainment zone from tour books and promotional pamphlets, yet visitors still come to gawk and to indulge. A hundred federal agents converged on the clubs in 1971. One mayor tried to buy the clubs out. His successor tried to move them to the city's industrial hinterlands. State police sent 500 troopers in on raids in 1994. A grand jury investigated alleged kickbacks to liquor board inspectors.
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NEWS
May 28, 1997
OF ALL PEOPLE, the public should have been able to count on Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III to enforce laws regulating activities both within and outside the downtown nudie bars on Baltimore Street known as The Block. After all, the Housing Department is just down the street inside the Benton Building. The hundreds of city employees who work for Mr. Henson are among the most likely to be confronted by any excess that spills from The Block's tawdry adult entertainment venues.For years, Baltimore has been trying to decide whether it wants The Block as part of its colorful history or among the current attractions that help entertain tourists.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2010
Although employees at The Block's clubs returned Friday night, the bustling business that was typical for Baltimore's hub of strip clubs had not. Most of the more than a dozen strip clubs and adult entertainment shops had been closed since Monday's five-alarm fire, which gutted the Gayety Show World bookstore and damaged two other nightspots. Friday night, however, the city fire marshal permitted businesses on the south side of the 400 block of E. Baltimore St. to reopen. On Friday night, normally busy intersections instead had two police cars parked and lines of yellow tape closing the street to traffic, plus a chain link fence blocking off the south sidewalk between Commerce and Gay streets.
NEWS
April 29, 1992
The bells are tolling for The Block, Baltimore's once-famous adult entertainment district just around the corner from City Hall. Under a bill introduced by Councilman Wilbur Cunningham, adult entertainment businesses, peep shows and porno shops would be outlawed from the central business district by July, 1995. They would then be mitted only as scattered conditional uses in manufacturing districts.This is a timely legislative initiative. As lifestyles and entertainment technologies have changed, The Block, in the 400 block East Baltimore Street, has increasingly become a seedy anachronism.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1998
A city councilwoman trying to bolster Baltimore night life said yesterday that she opposes any plans to regulate adult entertainment through the city's Board of Liquor License Commissioners.The Maryland General Assembly recently approved legislation to shift the oversight of strip bars on The Block from the city's Department of Housing and Community Development to the liquor board.But Councilwoman Stephanie C. Rawlings said she opposes the shift because of last week's indictments of a former state legislator and the chief liquor inspector on charges that they were involved in a 10-year bribery scheme to thwart state liquor laws.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1998
City Council members are considering a proposal to give the city's liquor board the authority to license and regulate strip parlors and adult video stores.Council President Lawrence A. Bell III introduced the legislation at last night's meeting on behalf of the city Department of Housing and Community Development, which controls licensing of adult entertainment parlors.Articles last year by The Sun revealed that the housing department had failed to enforce the laws.Undercover police officers cited dancers for prostitution, topless dancing, obscene stage acts, pressuring customers to buy drinks and other infractions.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2000
In an effort to free Baltimore police officers to focus on more serious crime, city liquor inspectors are playing a greater role in enforcing adult entertainment laws. This week, liquor inspectors cited two bars on The Block during the first of several planned undercover operations designed to halt illegal sexual conduct. Enforcement of those laws traditionally has been the responsibility of the Police Department's vice squad, but officers often have to focus on other more serious crimes, said Samuel T. Daniels Jr., chief inspector for the Board of Liquor License Commissioners.
NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | December 10, 1994
Anthony J. Ambridge said The Block has deteriorated since the 2nd District councilman sneaked down to one of its lurid nightclubs as 15-year-old to see a performance by the legendary stripper Blaze Starr.Mr. Ambridge and the rest of the City Council voted Thursday to approve a bill to regulate The Block. After six years of negotiations between city officials and owners of businesses in the adult entertainment district, both sides agree that the new rules will permit its survival."The good businessmen will survive; the bad will not," said Mr. Ambridge, chairman of the City Council's land use committee.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2003
A nightclub on downtown's west side has provoked an outcry from the University of Maryland, Baltimore by asking the city zoning board for approval to offer adult entertainment in an area the university and business groups hope to revitalize. Club Bunns, at 606-608 W. Lexington St., says it offers adult shows but needs permission to continue. The university, a huge institution with significant political influence, counters that a legally sanctioned strip bar is the last thing the area needs.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | March 1, 2010
When Denise Whitman moved to Baltimore's Fells Point neighborhood 35 years ago, the strip joint at the corner of Eastern Avenue and Washington Street fit right in. But that was before rowhouses became trendy, and before young professionals and families replaced dockworkers and factory hands. Now, she and many of her neighbors say, it's time for the club to go. "Adult entertainment does not belong side-by-side with residential properties," said Whitman. "The neighborhood has changed.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun Reporter | October 18, 2006
Baltimore's newest strip club, Scores, is poised to expand but without the striptease acts that its owner says draw pro athletes and diplomats alike. Scores owner Brian Shulman won approval from the zoning appeals board recently to open a second-floor lounge at his Fallsway club but with the caveat that there would be no adult entertainment there. The approval has city and liquor board officials wondering, however, what the prohibition means. They say there's no way they can stop entertainers from hanging out in the upstairs lounge as long as the women are dressed and not performing.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2004
Will the new owners of a longtime X-rated movie theater in Upper Fells Point be allowed to convert it into a strip club? To be continued ... An anticipated decision by a city zoning appeals board was postponed yesterday when the lawyer for owners of the Apex movie house, KMI Entertainment, asked for a delay so they could have more time to win over community leaders, who oppose the change in the building's use. But neighborhood leaders from Upper Fells...
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2004
When do community leaders rally around an X-rated movie theater? When it's a choice between that and a strip club. The owners of the Apex theater on South Broadway in Upper Fells Point, a longtime home for X-rated movies and something of a Baltimore landmark, want to turn the aging cinema into a private adult entertainment club. Although city zoning officials initially rejected KMI Entertainment's proposal, the Board of Municipal and Zoning Appeals is scheduled to reconsider it at 1:30 p.m. tomorrow.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2004
The Howard County Council began its annual summer recess after approving one bill deemed illegal by county and state lawyers, and another that fails to achieve its sponsor's stated goal. The council, which met Friday before its monthlong break, also approved a bill placing new zoning restrictions on adult entertainment businesses. East Columbia Democrat David A. Rakes said his purpose in proposing to move a sensitive planning boundary south, from Columbia to the Middle Patuxent River, was to help the Pentecostal Church of God sell its 28-acre property for development.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2004
A proposed ban on leghold animal traps and a new law to restrict the location of adult entertainment stores attracted the most comment at a Howard County Council public hearing last night, though a measure that would move a sensitive planning boundary drew strong opposition from the Rouse Co. County trappers and farmers - including the brother of a councilman - turned out to strongly oppose a ban on leghold traps in a revised animal control ordinance supported...
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1998
A bill that would create a Night Life Task Force to regulate and monitor bars and entertainment establishments, including the infamous strip clubs on The Block, was introduced last night in City Council.The bill, if passed, could result in bars and clubs staying open later than the state's 2 a.m. curfew but not serving liquor.The measure, introduced by Northwest Baltimore Councilwoman Stephanie C. Rawlings, fell shy of what some hoped would be a tougher stance against adult entertainment in the 400 block of E. Baltimore St.Initial discussions proposed transferring enforcement of adult entertainment laws to the city's Board of Liquor License Commissioners from the city Department of Housing and Community Development.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
Two city establishments were cited after raids by Baltimore police officers found illegal adult entertainment, officials said yesterday.Members of the police vice enforcement unit working with agents from the State Comptroller's Office entered the 1810 Club in the 1800 block of Pennsylvania Ave. about 11: 15 p.m. Friday, police said. Sgt. Craig Gentile, supervisor of the unit, said club owner Donald Gillums, 44, was charged with dispensing alcohol without a liquor license and given a citation for unlicensed adult entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2004
Pornography is going mobile. That means the increased possibility of erotic, adult content anytime, anywhere. The $10 billion adult entertainment industry has all but conquered the world of magazines, home movies and the Internet. Now, telecommunications experts say it's coming soon to a wireless phone near you. Already popular in Asia and Europe, wireless adult content could generate $1 billion to $6.5 billion in revenue within the next few years, say experts who predict that it will soon invade the U.S. market, as new technology hitting the States makes it possible for people to swap pictures, browse the Web, instant message and stream video all on one phone.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2003
For years, the Bay Lady has plied Baltimore-area waters. It is a 550-seat floating function hall that has seen eighth-grade field trips, prom parties, wedding receptions, family reunions and corporate parties. And, for one night last month, police say, an "exotic" -- and illegal -- lingerie show out in the harbor. Acting on a tip, two undercover detectives bought $45 tickets for the Aug. 1 nighttime cruise. What they saw may seem tame by the standards of The Block's strip clubs, but it was enough to trigger a report of unlawful adult entertainment and alcohol consumption.
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