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By Susan C. Aldridge | July 6, 2010
I have had the pleasure of handing diplomas to some unusual people at commencement. Still, it was startling to see the child walk toward me. He was 9. He looked younger. He wasn't accepting the diploma for himself, of course. It was for his dad, on active duty in Iraq. He'd sent his son, living on a base in Germany, to get it for him. "Congratulations," I said. He and his dad deserved it. At University of Maryland University College (UMUC), our graduates are America's adult learners.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Eric Thompson said among the first challenges in his Arab immersion class was learning the Arabic word for "yes. " To the Arnold resident, it sounded a lot like the English word, "no. " "So when teachers are congratulating you, you're saying, 'Oh, I have messed up,'" said the 17-year old, who is among dozens of foreign language students in the recent Launch into Arabic Learning and Teaching Program, a summer immersion initiative coordinated by...
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NEWS
May 31, 2003
Thelma Oretta Cornish, who retired as a supervisor for the State Department of Education, died of Parkinson's disease May 24 at Magnolia Hall Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in Chestertown. She was 83. She was born and raised Thelma Oretta Murray in Salem, Dorchester County, and was a 1937 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School in Cambridge. "She was the eighth child of 14. Her parents were farmers, and her father was also a minister," said a niece, Lauretta Freeman of Worton, in Kent County.
NEWS
By Laura Gamble, Josh Fidler and Tom Wilcox | February 12, 2014
Business leaders are investing in education in Baltimore, and not just out of charity or to "give back. " While both are worthy purposes, our business leaders recognize the bottom line value in a growing and diverse Baltimore economy. Investment in education will make that a reality. Various levels of government are reciprocating, and the legislative session and upcoming gubernatorial race offer a perfect time to take that work to the next level. These leaders are investing in public education because they need an educated workforce, because they want good schools that will help the city retain the many young adults who want to continue their urban lifestyle here when they start families, and because education is the best route out of poverty for our underserved youth.
NEWS
By GEORGE A. PRUITT | July 20, 1991
Trenton, New Jersey. -- A fundamental shift has occurred in the way our society develops and maintains an educated populace. Today, colleges represent a minority sector in providing post-secondary education. There are more students, faculty, dollars and facilities engaged in post-secondary education within corporations, unions and the military than in all of this country's colleges and universities put together.Twenty 20 years ago, I attended an American Association for Higher Education conference on ''The New Learning Society.
NEWS
By Jason Perkins-Cohen | March 21, 2005
JOHNNY CAN'T READ. Neither can his parents, and if they are in school trying to learn to read, government is about to tell them to go home and not bother. One in five adult Marylanders reads at less than a fourth-grade level. This means they can't understand simple directions or locate an intersection on a map. Another 25 percent of the state's adults read below eighth-grade level. This means they are not yet able to prepare for General Educational Development or help their children learn to read.
NEWS
December 3, 1992
Adult education, evening high school and GED courses will cost more in Baltimore County next year.The average increase will be 18 percent per course, according to Dale Rauenzahn, coordinator of adult and alternative education for the Baltimore County Board of Education.For general education and technology courses meeting four hours a week, county residents will pay a registration fee of $52, instead of $44.Non-residents will pay $130 -- an increase of $20.A 10-week course meeting two hours a week will cost $26 instead of $22 for county residents and $65 instead of $55 for non-residents.
NEWS
February 24, 2007
H. Allan Lipsitz, a retired teacher who became a director of adult education at Beth El Congregation, died Feb. 17 of a heart attack at his Pikesville home. He was 64. in Baltimore and raised in Ashburton, he was a 1959 City College graduate and earned a bachelor's degree in English in 1963 from the University of Maryland, College Park. He also earned three master's degrees, the first from Maryland and two others from the Johns Hopkins University. They included studies in English, education and liberal arts.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | February 7, 2008
To tackle a shortage of skilled workers in Maryland, Gov. Martin O'Malley, at an event in Hanover yesterday, highlighted several initiatives aimed at bringing state agencies together to provide job training and adult education. "There are still a lot of people whose skills have not been employed to the degree that they would like them to be," O'Malley said. "We can take our talents for granted or realize they really are competitive advantages and build upon them." The economy in Maryland, and especially Baltimore, has undergone a long-term shift from a reliance on industrial jobs to a focus on high-tech enterprises such as biotechnology and federal government contracting.
NEWS
By Phyllis Flowers Phyllis Lucas | January 21, 1991
Did you make up your mind that 1991 would be the year that you do something just for yourself?Maybe you decided to take a computer course or a flower-arranging course. Well, we are very excited about the large selection of adult education courses North County High is offering this year.North County High is the school most Brooklyn Park students attend, so we know many parents would benefit from this information.Some of the classes being offered include: watercolors, ballroom dancing, basic sewing, bookkeeping and accounting, keyboarding, computer education and parent effectiveness training.
NEWS
October 5, 2012
Your article about students' difficulties taking the state high school equivalency exam left readers with several misperceptions ("GED test takers face obstacles," Oct. 2). Last year, the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation increased the number of GED tests offered each month by 12 percent, which is nearly 12,000 tests each year. We have reduced the testing wait time from three months to one. We also added six new testing centers, including three in Baltimore City. In addition, we are investing in new staff for the GED office in order to serve Marylanders even more effectively.
EXPLORE
September 13, 2011
An article in the Sept. 14, 1961 edition of the Herald Argus and Baltimore Countian reported on a startling discovery made at a Catonsville dry cleaners. The finding of a .38 cal. copper coated lead bullet touched off quite a lot of excitement in this area last Thursday. It all started when Anthony Crisaufille, who operates a cleaning establishment in the 6300 block Baltimore National Pike, came across the bullet wrapped in a napkin in one of the seven pairs of pants that someone had sent to be cleaned.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
There is much to celebrate these days. Economic indicators across the country are starting to improve. Joblessness is decreasing, corporate America continues to document record profits, and commercial sales are increasing. Yet we are not out of the woods. Baltimore's unemployment leads the state at 7.9 percent. The poverty rate stands at 22.9 percent. Per capita income is only $21,562. And too many adults still have significant educational needs at a time when city funding through the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
NEWS
By Susan C. Aldridge | July 6, 2010
I have had the pleasure of handing diplomas to some unusual people at commencement. Still, it was startling to see the child walk toward me. He was 9. He looked younger. He wasn't accepting the diploma for himself, of course. It was for his dad, on active duty in Iraq. He'd sent his son, living on a base in Germany, to get it for him. "Congratulations," I said. He and his dad deserved it. At University of Maryland University College (UMUC), our graduates are America's adult learners.
NEWS
December 17, 2008
Adult education funding can jump-start renewal The Maryland Association for Adult, Community and Continuing Education agrees with Erik Christiansen that education is vital to the future success of America and the state of Maryland ("More than just jobs," Commentary, Dec. 11). The current economic crisis has given us all a chance to pause to consider what the true priorities should be for government spending. Mr. Christiansen understands education's fundamental role and its significance in contributing to our economy: According to U.S. Census Bureau figures for 2005, workers 18 and over with a bachelor's degree earn an average of $51,206 a year; those without a high school diploma averaged $18,734.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | July 25, 2008
Interested in learning how to promote your business through blogging? How about becoming an improv comedian, protecting yourself from street crime or improving your memory? This fall, the continuing education department at Howard Community College is offering more than 50 new noncredit classes, more than ever before, said Joanne Erickson, marketing coordinator for the Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development at HCC. "This is the highest number of new courses we've ever had," she said.
NEWS
January 22, 1991
Evening business courses for adults begin next month a adult education centers in Baltimore County.Sponsored by the Baltimore County Public Schools' Office of Adult Education, the courses begin the week of Feb. 25. Registration takes place at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 19 and 20 in adult education centers.Course offerings include: accounting, math review, word processing, keyboarding, shorthand, math review and small business operation.County library branches carry spring semester catalogs. For more information, call the Office of Adult Education at 887-4064.
NEWS
By Jason Perkins-Cohen | September 14, 2006
This newspaper and others recently reported that according to Census Bureau data, wages for low-wage workers declined 2 percent since 2003 after factoring in inflation - this while worker productivity rose steadily. During the same period, wages for workers in the top income brackets kept well ahead of inflation. Fortunately, despite the severity of the issue, there are ways to fight wage stagnation. We need to invest in our work force by making adult education and training readily available.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | March 9, 2008
The statistics are eye-opening - if not startling. In Maryland, one of the most affluent states in the nation, significant swaths of poverty endure in urban and rural areas, among families and children. In Baltimore, 22.2 percent of residents live in poverty, new Census Bureau estimates show. To the east in Somerset County, the figure is 20.1 percent. And to the west in Allegany County, 15 percent of residents live in poverty. In a state where life for most residents has improved, those on the lowest rungs remain stuck.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | February 7, 2008
To tackle a shortage of skilled workers in Maryland, Gov. Martin O'Malley, at an event in Hanover yesterday, highlighted several initiatives aimed at bringing state agencies together to provide job training and adult education. "There are still a lot of people whose skills have not been employed to the degree that they would like them to be," O'Malley said. "We can take our talents for granted or realize they really are competitive advantages and build upon them." The economy in Maryland, and especially Baltimore, has undergone a long-term shift from a reliance on industrial jobs to a focus on high-tech enterprises such as biotechnology and federal government contracting.
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