Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAdult Children
IN THE NEWS

Adult Children

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | September 13, 2011
If my sister had her way, my niece would never leave home. Thankfully, my 18-year-old niece managed to escape to college this year. But some families are struggling financially and parents and their young adult children are forced to double up. The U.S. Census Bureau today released new data that showed the number of “double-up households” rose by 2 million from 2007 to 21.8 million by spring 2011. As of this spring, 5.9 million people age 25 to 34 lived with their parent's, up from 4.7 million before the recession.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Dan Appenfeller, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
One thing kept Jocelyn Wheeler going June 30 as she sped to hop through laundry baskets, mummify her teammate in cloth and haul that teammate on her shoulders through a mile-long stretch. It was her daughter, and her teammate for the day, 10-year-old Alexandra. The two were in the thick of the Great Amazing Race, a mile course filled with zany obstacles and tasks, such as using wet sponges to fill buckets and a whole lot of piggyback riding. And today, it's making its inaugural stop in Maryland, hitting Susquehanna State Park in Havre de Grace.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
John Pittas' mother spent six months in a Pennsylvania facility recovering after an auto accident, then moved to Greece to be with her other children. Left behind: $93,000 in unpaid care bills. The facility sued to collect - from John Pittas. A court sided with the care facility last year and ordered the son, who runs a diner in Schnecksville, Pa., to pay up. The basis of the lawsuit is a so-called filial support law, which requires adult children to be responsible for the care of indigent parents.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
John Pittas' mother spent six months in a Pennsylvania facility recovering after an auto accident, then moved to Greece to be with her other children. Left behind: $93,000 in unpaid care bills. The facility sued to collect - from John Pittas. A court sided with the care facility last year and ordered the son, who runs a diner in Schnecksville, Pa., to pay up. The basis of the lawsuit is a so-called filial support law, which requires adult children to be responsible for the care of indigent parents.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | February 19, 1992
MANY POPULAR assumptions about children of alcoholics are being questioned by new research, posing a challenge to the hugely popular therapy movement directed at them and other "adult children" of problem families.Although proponents of the movement say they have scientific support for their views, critics are unconvinced.The therapy is based on the idea that the childhood experiences of "adult children of alcoholics," or "ACOAs," have left them with unique emotional patterns and problems.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | July 21, 1992
Bill Clinton's candor about his childhood with an alcoholic stepfather who was abusive toward his mother, widely publicized last week at the Democratic National Convention, may serve as an inspiration to other people who have alcoholic family members.His reaction to a problem fraught with shame and denial is also healthy and refreshing, say counselors who work with alcoholics and their families.And although no one calls growing up in an alcoholic family beneficial, such a trauma may have taught the Democratic presidential candidate coping skills that serve him well in governing and campaigning.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | November 15, 1990
Some things in life a man never forgets. For Brian Barke, those include his first girlfriend, his bar mitzvah -- and the day his parents split up."It's like the day Kennedy was shot," says Mr. Barke, who was 18 when his parents' marriage ended nearly five years ago. "You can remember everything about it."My dad came in to my room and said, 'I've got to tell you something.' He lowered the radio. My brother Steve came over and sat on my bed. It felt like we were kids again. There we were, grown men sitting on a bed, as if my dad were going to tell us, 'You have to stay in tonight.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | August 15, 1995
It was the moment Joel Cohen most feared -- no one was answering at his father's house in Baltimore. His 87-year-old father was legally blind, almost deaf and increasingly senile. He also was almost 1,700 miles away.But Dr. Cohen didn't have to catch a plane or drive madly for hours to find out whether his father was OK. The Denver math professor simply dialed the Baltimore firm he had hired to help care for his dad, and 20 minutes later, the answer came back: His father was outside on the porch with a radio, listening to the ballgame.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2004
Gayle Lomax of Columbia figured she had successfully launched her first child from the nest four years ago when her daughter moved to Washington to attend Howard University. But six months ago, her daughter was back home, no longer able to afford her apartment on a part-time job and saddled with more than $5,000 in credit card debt. The 22-year-old has finished school and is working as a waitress while searching for a job in television production. "The prospects aren't really good. She may be home longer than a year or so," said Lomax, a single parent.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 4, 2003
Mary Richards, Diane Chambers and Chandler Bing would be aghast. For more than three decades, young television characters have been striking out on their own and finding their adult identities at work or with friends. But this season, TV characters in the their 20s and 30s - some with degrees, a few with jobs, most without - are doing an about-face on the road to adulthood and heading back home to live with - or live off the largesse of - mom and dad. The phenomenon is so common in real life that sociologists have a way to describe it: "Boomerang Generation."
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
A man driving a motorcycle died Saturday after a head-on collision with a SUV in Sparks, police said. The motorcyclist was driving east on Shawan Road near Beaver Dam Road at 7:57 a.m. when he lost control and struck a Toyota 4Runner, Cpl. John Wachter said. Four occupants in the SUV, including two adults and two juveniles, were taken to area hospitals with serious injuries. The motorcycle driver was pronounced dead at the scene. ywenger@baltsun.com twitter.com/yvonnewenger
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
A new 30-second television commercial opposing same-sex marriage makes a claim that children "do best" when reared in a traditional, heterosexual marriage - or, as the ad says, by "their married mom and dad. " What the ad says: The ad is narrated by a woman while images of young married couples and babies flash across the screen. The ad, funded by the Maryland Marriage Alliance, says that the institution of marriage has a long history in society and is "more than what adults want for themselves - it is about the next generation.
EXPLORE
September 11, 2012
Barbara Currano states in her anti-gay-marriage letter that "the purpose of marriage is the creation and nurturing of new human life," that children of gay parents have a biological parent who is "deliberately disconnected from the child for the benefit of the adults," and that gay parents "cannot make up for the father or mother missing from the child's life. " Do I take it, then, that Ms. Currano is equally passionately opposed to marriage by heterosexual infertile or postmenopausal individuals, divorce, stepparents, and adoption?
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
Lou Ruth Blake was the family's matriarch who sang in the church choir and organized gospel shows. Lowell Frederick Blake liked to make people laugh. Venessa Marie Blake was the ardent churchgoer with a contagious smile. All three family members died within days of each other earlier this month from complications of the flu — a cluster that state officials acknowledged was unusual. Their deaths caused a stir in the community of Lusby in Calvert County, where Blake family roots run deep in the town of nearly 1,600.
EXPLORE
By Kellie Woodhouse | February 2, 2012
The idea for Jerdine Nolen's first book sprang from an uneventful summer afternoon almost 25 years ago spent scrubbing the toilet. “I was cleaning my bathroom, and this little voice said, 'Harvey Potter was a very strange fellow indeed,' ” Nolen, 58, recalls as she sits barefoot at her Ellicott City kitchen table sipping tea. “That was the thought that floated up to me. I had no idea what it was attached to, but when you explore through your...
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | September 13, 2011
If my sister had her way, my niece would never leave home. Thankfully, my 18-year-old niece managed to escape to college this year. But some families are struggling financially and parents and their young adult children are forced to double up. The U.S. Census Bureau today released new data that showed the number of “double-up households” rose by 2 million from 2007 to 21.8 million by spring 2011. As of this spring, 5.9 million people age 25 to 34 lived with their parent's, up from 4.7 million before the recession.
BUSINESS
By Adele Evans and Adele Evans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2001
It was late at night when the phone rang at Jan Horst's house. It was her mother, telling her that she was in great pain and that she needed her. "I just had to walk downstairs and take her to the hospital," said Jan, whose mother suffered a ruptured appendix. "She could have died. I was so thankful I was right there." Later came a case of pneumonia, when, again, Jan was right there to help her mother and be at her side. "There's no place like home, and I can manage her care," Jan said.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2011
Seventeen people were taken to the hospital after a bus full of kindergartners and parents on a field trip crashed in Centreville, Maryland State Police said Thursday. The bus had been taking the Kent County students to the National Zoo in Washington before the morning crash. Just before 9 a.m., a Stevensville man driving a sport utility vehicle attempted to make a left turn onto southbound Route 213 and turned into the path of a charter bus carrying 17 children and 16 adults from Worton Elementary School, said Elena Russo, a state police spokeswoman.
NEWS
March 1, 2011
I was born and raised in Baltimore, and while I know you prefer to hear from locals, I thought you might be interested in hearing from someone who no longer lives there, but had been considering returning. After returning home from a six-year tour in the Navy, I went to the University of Maryland, graduated with a degree in nuclear engineering and, unable to find a job in Maryland, took a position in North Carolina. I have lived in many states, both East and West, during my naval and civilian life and therefore I have a broad basis from which to compare various attributes of an area.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.