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By STEPHEN HUNTER and STEPHEN HUNTER,Sun Film Critic | November 2, 1990
'Jacob's Ladder'Starring Tim Robbins.Directed by Adrian Lyne.Released by Carolco.Rated R.** 1/2We are slamming "Jacob's Ladder," we are slamming "Jacob's Ladder," we are slamming "Jacob's Ladder," soldiers of the bored.The movie, a collaboration between "Ghost" screenwriter and serious mystic Bruce Joel Rubin and "Fatal Attraction's" super slick image mechanic Adrian Lyne, works hard to earn its scorn: a $25 million fever dream, it is fast, visceral, commanding, demanding, incomprehensible and silly.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 10, 2002
SUN SCORE *** (three stars) American movies are generally so skittish about sexuality that Adrian Lyne's appetite - and aptitude - for exploring it in Unfaithful is a relief. In this variation on Claude Chabrol's ambiguously ironic La Femme Infidele, Lyne does the opposite of Chabrol: Lyne sensualizes everything, including an All-American family, so that watching this movie, at least for its first half, is like stretching out in a sauna set for different times at different temperatures: warm for the domestic scenes, hot-hot-hot for the illicit lovemaking.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,sun staff | August 2, 1998
Sex. Violence. Language. Religion.Hot-button topics all, guaranteed to start debate in the halls of Congress, arguments at cocktail parties and controversy when brought to movie screens.Forty-seven years ago, the intense sexuality of "A Streetcar Named Desire" ruffled America's feathers. Twenty-nine years ago, the numbing violence of Sam Peckinpah's "The Wild Bunch" had audiences wondering how far Hollywood should be allowed to go. Fourteen years ago, Jean-Luc Godard's "Hail Mary" had people crying blasphemy and dousing moviegoers with holy water.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,sun staff | August 2, 1998
Sex. Violence. Language. Religion.Hot-button topics all, guaranteed to start debate in the halls of Congress, arguments at cocktail parties and controversy when brought to movie screens.Forty-seven years ago, the intense sexuality of "A Streetcar Named Desire" ruffled America's feathers. Twenty-nine years ago, the numbing violence of Sam Peckinpah's "The Wild Bunch" had audiences wondering how far Hollywood should be allowed to go. Fourteen years ago, Jean-Luc Godard's "Hail Mary" had people crying blasphemy and dousing moviegoers with holy water.
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By Lou Cedrone | November 2, 1990
''Jacob's Ladder'' takes a long time getting to the point, and when it does, there isn't that much to it.Some people are going to be very confused by this film. It does not, as they say, give anyone quarter. You might say it is a work movie.Adrian Lyne (''Fatal Attraction'') directed the film, which plays, at times, like a chapter in the ''Friday the 13th'' series.That should come as no surprise. The silliest thing about ''Fatal Attraction'' was the finish, one in which Glenn Close went down for the count then resurged from that bathtub, as villains do in horror films, to give Michael Douglas a bit more trouble.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 10, 2002
SUN SCORE *** (three stars) American movies are generally so skittish about sexuality that Adrian Lyne's appetite - and aptitude - for exploring it in Unfaithful is a relief. In this variation on Claude Chabrol's ambiguously ironic La Femme Infidele, Lyne does the opposite of Chabrol: Lyne sensualizes everything, including an All-American family, so that watching this movie, at least for its first half, is like stretching out in a sauna set for different times at different temperatures: warm for the domestic scenes, hot-hot-hot for the illicit lovemaking.
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By Lou Cedrone | November 1, 1990
Tim Robbins is one of those actors who doesn't always play it safe. He could have written his own ticket after doing ''Bull Durham,'' but he chose to divide his time between the stage and movies, choosing the latter with care. He stars in ''Jacob's Ladder,'' which opens Friday.''I try to keep my eye on what's important,'' he said. ''I want to do a variety of things, challenging things, rather than make quick money. After 'Bull Durham,' I could have worked steadily, done movies back to back and made a lot of money, but I would rather pace myself.
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By The Hollywood Reporter | July 7, 1995
Jeremy Irons is in final negotiations to star in Adrian Lyne's remake of Stanley Kubrick's 1962 classic dark comedy "Lolita."Sources said that Mr. Irons will play the part of Humbert Humbert, a gentle English professor whose life turns tragic because of his passionate love for a 12-year-old nymphet and the vengeful determination of the girl's sleazy but canny former lover.While Dianne Wiest initially had been considered for the role of Lolita's mother, sources said that discussions are under way to bring Melanie Griffith on board.
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By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 7, 2003
NEW YORK - Roman Polanski's The Pianist, an emotionally devastating portrait of Polish life during the Holocaust, was the big winner at the 37th annual award vote meeting of The National Society of Film Critics, taking four major prizes: best director, actor, screenplay and film. Polanski's movie was based on the true-life memoirs of Wladyslaw Szpilman, a young classical pianist who lived through the hellish World War II Nazi occupation in Warsaw. It has been hailed as a definitive comeback for the controversial director, who, as a youngster, experienced the Polish holocaust years himself in Krakow, the site of Schindler's List.
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By Daniel Cerone and Daniel Cerone,Los Angeles Times | February 20, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- Remember the controversial finale of "Fatal Attraction," a bloody bathroom scene during which Anne Archer guns down Glenn Close shortly after Michael Douglas dunks her in a bathtub? Some movie fans may recall that another, far less violent ending was first shot by director Adrian Lyne.The original conclusion to the 1987 thriller will be included on a new home-video and laser-disc release of "Fatal Attraction" in March from Paramount Home Video as part of its "Directors' Series."
ENTERTAINMENT
By STEPHEN HUNTER and STEPHEN HUNTER,Sun Film Critic | November 2, 1990
'Jacob's Ladder'Starring Tim Robbins.Directed by Adrian Lyne.Released by Carolco.Rated R.** 1/2We are slamming "Jacob's Ladder," we are slamming "Jacob's Ladder," we are slamming "Jacob's Ladder," soldiers of the bored.The movie, a collaboration between "Ghost" screenwriter and serious mystic Bruce Joel Rubin and "Fatal Attraction's" super slick image mechanic Adrian Lyne, works hard to earn its scorn: a $25 million fever dream, it is fast, visceral, commanding, demanding, incomprehensible and silly.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | November 2, 1990
''Jacob's Ladder'' takes a long time getting to the point, and when it does, there isn't that much to it.Some people are going to be very confused by this film. It does not, as they say, give anyone quarter. You might say it is a work movie.Adrian Lyne (''Fatal Attraction'') directed the film, which plays, at times, like a chapter in the ''Friday the 13th'' series.That should come as no surprise. The silliest thing about ''Fatal Attraction'' was the finish, one in which Glenn Close went down for the count then resurged from that bathtub, as villains do in horror films, to give Michael Douglas a bit more trouble.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | November 1, 1990
Tim Robbins is one of those actors who doesn't always play it safe. He could have written his own ticket after doing ''Bull Durham,'' but he chose to divide his time between the stage and movies, choosing the latter with care. He stars in ''Jacob's Ladder,'' which opens Friday.''I try to keep my eye on what's important,'' he said. ''I want to do a variety of things, challenging things, rather than make quick money. After 'Bull Durham,' I could have worked steadily, done movies back to back and made a lot of money, but I would rather pace myself.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 7, 1993
"Indecent Proposal," the slick new Adrian Lyne film, asks: Is everything for sale? The answer it gives is: Yes, except good screenplays.Largely, it's a gloss on a mean old story that used to make the rounds:Millionaire at a party goes up to a woman, says, "Would yousleep with me for a million dollars?" She says, "Yes." He says, "Would you sleep with me for $50?" She says, "What do you think I am, a whore?" He says, "We've already established that. Now we're haggling on the price."In this case, it's debonair Robert Redford making the pitch, without the haggling.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 1, 1999
"Lolita," Adrian Lyne's adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov's unadaptable novel, is much better than it has any right to be.As anyone who has read the book knows, the artistry of "Lolita" lies in the writing, in Nabokov's cunning use of the English language in the creation of character, mood and unstoppable narrative. Unless a director were literally to photograph pages turning, why on earth bother to film it?Lyne makes a surprisingly good case in this smart, well-acted interpretation. If his version doesn't necessarily bring new insight or fresh emphasis to Nabokov's story of obsession and destruction, neither does it besmirch the original work in any way.It's a noble effort, forming a respectable bookend to Stanley Kubrick's entirely surreal stab at "Lolita" 36 years ago. And bookend is the appropriate term, because between these two relatively minor movies stands a towering work of art that is first, last and always literary.
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