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Adrenaline Rush

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NEWS
September 26, 2014
Congratulations to Steve Almond for speaking the culturally unspeakable by suggesting that we should question the fundamental nature of the game of football ( "Fans are part of the football problem," Sept. 24). In high school in the '60s, I played and enjoyed the game at an all-boys school where the varsity players were explicitly touted as "men of character" because they showed how "tough" they were. I kept my resentment of that to myself at the time but since I have come to see that my enjoyment and subsequent chagrin stemmed from the realization that football really brought out the worst in me - the adrenaline rush of permissible aggressive violence in front of a crowd.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 26, 2014
Congratulations to Steve Almond for speaking the culturally unspeakable by suggesting that we should question the fundamental nature of the game of football ( "Fans are part of the football problem," Sept. 24). In high school in the '60s, I played and enjoyed the game at an all-boys school where the varsity players were explicitly touted as "men of character" because they showed how "tough" they were. I kept my resentment of that to myself at the time but since I have come to see that my enjoyment and subsequent chagrin stemmed from the realization that football really brought out the worst in me - the adrenaline rush of permissible aggressive violence in front of a crowd.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
Attention, adrenaline junkies: It's your time of year. Friday marks the beginning the teeth-rattling lead-up to Halloween, when creepy-crawly things lurk in every shadow, and the sound of someone — or something — scuffling through the leaves on dark nights can make even the boldest run for cover. Not that we mind being scared; in fact, we relish it. Folks of all ages tour haunted houses, deliberately walk through graveyards and throng to frightening films. Psychologists say the resulting chemical rush makes us feel stronger, swifter and more alert.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | April 15, 2014
We should all be so fortunate to be able to retire at age 27 and embark on an international quest to experience a world full of fun and privilege, but Michael Phelps - quite predictably - has come to realize that living the good life isn't going to be enough to keep him entertained. That's because there is a reason why he spent all those years getting up in the dark to swim all those endless laps. There's a reason why he is the greatest swimmer in history and the most decorated Olympian of all time.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | April 15, 2014
We should all be so fortunate to be able to retire at age 27 and embark on an international quest to experience a world full of fun and privilege, but Michael Phelps - quite predictably - has come to realize that living the good life isn't going to be enough to keep him entertained. That's because there is a reason why he spent all those years getting up in the dark to swim all those endless laps. There's a reason why he is the greatest swimmer in history and the most decorated Olympian of all time.
NEWS
By Kathy Bergren Smith and Kathy Bergren Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 2004
Ready to try something different? With plenty of open spaces and waterways, Anne Arundel County offers plenty of offbeat recreation - from the sky to deep below the sea. Head to Lee Airport in Edgewater and for $125 take a one-hour introductory flying lesson at the Navy Annapolis Flight Center (www.nafcflying.org). If you like the thought of piloting a plane, the instructors at the flight center will take you through all the training you need to earn private pilot certification. The center, which also provides introductory training in flight to Navy personnel, teaches students to fly in Piper or Cessna aircraft.
NEWS
By Gabriel Baird and Gabriel Baird,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2002
Tom Disney's weekends begin with the roar of modified engines, the aroma of burning rubber and the adrenaline rush of acceleration. The 21-year-old is a regular at Capitol Raceway in Crofton on Friday nights, where he has the freedom to drive his black 2001 Mustang GT as fast as he can. Before the crowd of more than a thousand, Disney can drop the clutch at the starting line, jump to about 105 mph and finish the quarter-mile race in about 13 seconds....
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | March 11, 2000
AT A TENDER age I was introduced to the adrenalin rush of crime and punishment, murder and mayhem in old Baltimore. My mother, often accompanied by her Aunt Cora, pursued police cars and fire engines. They devoured newspaper accounts of wrongdoing and larger doses of crime fiction. They gobbled up mystery novels and attended matinees at the Playhouse and Parkway theaters whenever Miss Marple was on the screen or Alfred Hitchcock had a new movie out. When a cat burglar terrorized the Guilford neighborhood -- as opposed to Guilford Avenue, where we lived -- they comforted me, a 7-year-old, by explaining that there was nothing in our house he'd want.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 14, 2003
What Citizen Kane was to movie lovers in 1941, The Wild Bunch was to cineastes in 1969. Its adrenaline rush of revelations seemed to explode the parameters of the screen. The director and the co-writer, Sam Peckinpah, turned the last stand of the Hole-in the-Wall Gang into a wrenching piece of early 20th-century mythology. His filmmaking both evinced and catalyzed complex feelings about the outlaws' freedom, brotherhood and professionalism, their manliness and childishness, and the way they experienced the closing of the West as Purgatory and used Latin America as an escape hatch.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2010
By writing the paper, Charles Whittington thought he would confront the anxieties that had tormented him since he returned from war. He knew it wasn't normal to dwell on the pleasure of sticking his knife between an enemy soldier's ribs. But by recording his words, maybe he'd begin to purge the fixation. So Whittington, an Iraq veteran, submitted an essay on the allure of combat for his English class at the Community College of Baltimore County in Catonsville. He called war a drug and wrote that killing "is something that I do not just want but something I really need so I can feel like myself.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
Attention, adrenaline junkies: It's your time of year. Friday marks the beginning the teeth-rattling lead-up to Halloween, when creepy-crawly things lurk in every shadow, and the sound of someone — or something — scuffling through the leaves on dark nights can make even the boldest run for cover. Not that we mind being scared; in fact, we relish it. Folks of all ages tour haunted houses, deliberately walk through graveyards and throng to frightening films. Psychologists say the resulting chemical rush makes us feel stronger, swifter and more alert.
NEWS
By Kathy Bergren Smith and Kathy Bergren Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 2004
Ready to try something different? With plenty of open spaces and waterways, Anne Arundel County offers plenty of offbeat recreation - from the sky to deep below the sea. Head to Lee Airport in Edgewater and for $125 take a one-hour introductory flying lesson at the Navy Annapolis Flight Center (www.nafcflying.org). If you like the thought of piloting a plane, the instructors at the flight center will take you through all the training you need to earn private pilot certification. The center, which also provides introductory training in flight to Navy personnel, teaches students to fly in Piper or Cessna aircraft.
NEWS
By Gabriel Baird and Gabriel Baird,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2002
Tom Disney's weekends begin with the roar of modified engines, the aroma of burning rubber and the adrenaline rush of acceleration. The 21-year-old is a regular at Capitol Raceway in Crofton on Friday nights, where he has the freedom to drive his black 2001 Mustang GT as fast as he can. Before the crowd of more than a thousand, Disney can drop the clutch at the starting line, jump to about 105 mph and finish the quarter-mile race in about 13 seconds....
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | March 11, 2000
AT A TENDER age I was introduced to the adrenalin rush of crime and punishment, murder and mayhem in old Baltimore. My mother, often accompanied by her Aunt Cora, pursued police cars and fire engines. They devoured newspaper accounts of wrongdoing and larger doses of crime fiction. They gobbled up mystery novels and attended matinees at the Playhouse and Parkway theaters whenever Miss Marple was on the screen or Alfred Hitchcock had a new movie out. When a cat burglar terrorized the Guilford neighborhood -- as opposed to Guilford Avenue, where we lived -- they comforted me, a 7-year-old, by explaining that there was nothing in our house he'd want.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | October 28, 2006
HARTFORD, Conn. -- For the first time in seven months, Kimmie Meissner experienced the adrenaline rush of competition and renewed attention of the figure skating world. The Bel Air teenager and reigning world champion opened her Grand Prix season last night at Skate America with a third-place finish in the short program, the first of two performances. She earned a score of 58.82, less than two points below her personal best. Women's short program Televised tomorrow, 1 p.m., Ch. 2
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | October 8, 2012
With the Baltimore Orioles in the playoffs for the first time since 1997, it's a good time to review great books on the sport, and the best I've read in years is "The Art of Fielding. " Chad Harbach's first novel is about much, much more than baseball. But the sport -- and a small college player's search for perfection -- is the driving force of the tale. Harbach has a great feel for the nuances of baseball, and even readers who aren't sports fans will come away with an understanding of the physical and psychological demands of the game.
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