Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAdoptive Parents
IN THE NEWS

Adoptive Parents

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jeffrey M. Landaw | June 7, 1993
THE WHOLE LIFE ADOPTION BOOK: REALISTIC ADVIC FOR BUILDING A HEALTHY ADOPTIVE FAMILY. By Jayne E. Schooler. Pinon Press. 217 pages. $12.IF YOU'VE been involved long enough in the world of adoption, support groups and information exchanges can start to seem like the norm. So an assertion like Jayne Schooler's, that "adoptive parents generally have no role models to steer them through the process," comes as a healthy reminder of how it must seem to parents and aspiring parents who are just starting out.Mrs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Howard Altstein | April 23, 2013
Sen. Ben Cardin of Maryland recently met with the family of Sergei Magnitsky. The reasons for the meeting: In 2009, Mr. Magnitsky was jailed in Russia for exposing governmental corruption. While in prison, he died after allegedly being tortured. In December, with the energetic legislative support of Senator Cardin, Congress passed a statute, the Magnitsky Act, forbidding those accused of human rights abuses in Russia from traveling to the U.S. This month, the Magnitsky family came to Washington to thank Senator Cardin for his efforts.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | July 9, 1994
Christopher and Karen Franklin had some reservations about going to a picnic designed to introduce children awaiting adoption to prospective parents.The Randallstown couple, who want to adopt, said they envisioned a "shopping market" for children.Nevertheless, the Franklins attended the picnic yesterday at Piney Run Park in Sykesville. It was sponsored by One Church, One Child, a minority adoption recruitment program administered by the state Department of Human Resources.They were pleasantly surprised.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
George Stevenson grew up in a family that cared for numerous foster children, and after mentoring and coaching boys in youth baseball for years, he decided to adopt a child of his own. He became the father of an 8-year-old boy and named him Galen, after his brother. As the boy grew older, relatives say, it became apparent that he was troubled, and at one point he had to be sent away to a treatment facility. Still, they say, none of that could have foretold what happened in late April, when police say Galen stabbed his 43-year-old father repeatedly inside their North Baltimore apartment.
NEWS
By Elsa C. Arnett and Elsa C. Arnett,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 4, 1994
BOCA RATON, Fla. -- Emily Welsh, a cherubic 2-year-old with little blond ringlets framing her face, frolics in her room tossing stuffed animals, doing backbends off her crib and tumbling on the carpet."
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | June 15, 1993
A group of adoptive families from Howard and Prince George's counties is forming a summer class for residents interested in adoption.The organizers are volunteers of a nonprofit group called Patapsco Families Adopting Children Everywhere.Course topics include overcoming depression associated with infertility, making the decision to adopt, U.S. and international adoption, independent adoption, agency adoptions and adjustment issues."We go over the good and the bad," said instructor Arlene Stephenson, who adopted a Korean girl nearly 10 years ago. "We arm them with questions to ask agencies."
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 17, 2001
In the first century A.D., the apostle Paul, the first Christian missionary, established a church in Philippi, a prosperous Roman colony in what is now modern-day Greece. Later, while in prison for his missionary work, Paul wrote a letter to the young church urging them to follow the example of Jesus Christ. Paul's letter, preserved in the New Testament of the Bible, has served as inspiration for Columbia's Korean-American Church of Philippi, said its senior pastor, the Rev. Young Sun Song.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer Staff writer Peter Hermann contributed to this story | November 21, 1993
The difference made by a sensational murder case nearly 10 years ago ago can be seen in two photographs of children swimming among coral reefs that hang on a wall of the Northern District Police Station in Linthicum.Another difference shows in a lawyer who has decided that it's silly to scream at his children over a messy room, and another in a woman who, her own children grown, devotes her time to teaching troubled young people how to cope and express themselves.In the decade since mild-mannered Larry Swartz, 17, killed his parents in a blood bath at the family's Cape St. Claire home on the night of Jan. 16, 1984, those close to the youth say the lessons they learned from his story changed their lives.
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | May 8, 1991
SOONER OR later, adoptive parents must decide when to tell their child he is adopted. The thinking these days is to do it as soon as your child joins the family.It's not that anyone expects an infant to understand. You are the one who benefits."It makes you more comfortable, it reduces anxiety. By the time the actual dialogue with your child begins, you'll be better equipped emotionally to handle it," says Susan Miller-Havens, a Cambridge psychologist and researcher who is director of education for the American Adoption Congress in Washington.
NEWS
April 1, 1993
Infected with AIDS, Catherine Williams was consumed with worry. Her concern was not about her approaching death, but about the fate of her four-year-old daughter Elizabeth, also infected with the AIDS virus. When Ms. Williams dies, Elizabeth will be an orphan.Her worry has ended. Ms. Williams has found a Carroll County family that will take in both her and Elizabeth, although a great many legal issues have to be settled first.Ms. Williams is not alone. There are as many as 144 women in Maryland who find themselves in the same situation.
NEWS
By Laura Laing | February 14, 2011
Facts are stubborn things, but statistics are more pliable. As a self-proclaimed geek and former math teacher, I love this quote. I have a great deal of respect for researchers and statisticians who help us better understand our lives, through the most beautiful language in the world — mathematics. But while numbers don't lie, they can be twisted to represent almost anything we want. Most of the misinformation — intentional and accidental — can be traced to the reader or reporter.
NEWS
February 2, 2011
Peter Sprigg's diatribe against same sex marriage ( "Same-sex marriage is contrary to the public interest," Feb. 2) is so full of contradictions and half-truths that it is difficult to decide where to begin responding. Assuming for the sake of argument that "the public purpose" of marriage is the procreation and rearing of children — although there is no reason to conclude that marriage has any one, exclusive "public purpose" — even Mr. Sprigg acknowledges that heterosexual couples marry for a host of "private purposes" and the state recognizes those marriages as valid even if the couple never intends to nor has children.
NEWS
By Paul Schwartzman, The Washington Post | January 23, 2011
Four-year-old Ila Yslande Ann Hubner waddled into the Frederick County Courthouse the other morning, arms flailing, legs kicking this way and that, babbling about the Cookie Monster. "Everything is 'Cookie Monster,' I don't know why," said Christie Hubner. A year ago, when Hubner and her husband, Dave, took custody of Ila, the child knew nothing about the Cookie Monster. She was an orphan in Port-au-Prince, Haiti — frightened, hungry and stranded in the rubble after last January's massive earthquake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy, the ebullient Memphis, Tenn., couple who made Michael Oher their third child, enrolled him at Ole Miss, then cheered him on when he became a Baltimore Raven, have collaborated on their own version of the story that became the book and the hit movie "The Blind Side. " With Washington Post columnist Sally Jenkins, they've written "In a Heartbeat: Sharing the Power of Cheerful Giving. " Their book aims to bring the Michael Oher miracle off the big screen and back down to real life — and make sure that its message won't get lost.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
At the Maryland Film Festival last month, writer-director Rodrigo Garcia said that his electric drama about primal bonds, "Mother and Child," the festival's closing-night attraction, would have been a top property for Bette Davis and would have received the full red-carpet treatment during Hollywood's Golden Age. As he spelled out in an interview at the Hotel Monaco the next morning, a director who wants to make an emotion-based movie in 2010...
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2010
Michelle Bedke attended Howard Community College's graduation Thursday with mixed emotions. The 20-year-old honors student was happy to receive her degree, and she will continue her education at the University of Maryland, College Park, where she will major in linguistics. There was also another feeling, spurred by the fact that she did not have any family in attendance to share in her accomplishment. "I'm kind of envious of other people," Bedke said Thursday of her fellow graduates.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | May 8, 1995
It is becoming clear that Otakar "Otto" Kirchner, the sperm-father of Baby Richard, is not a man to mess with.He is now so angry at the adoptive parents who raised Baby Richard to age 4 that he might not let them ever see the boy again.That, of course, is his right. The courts have held that as the sperm-father, Otto owns the child outright. He doesn't have to let the adoptive parents or anybody else see the boy.Or, if he so chooses, he can set up meetings according to his own terms.He could decide that he'll let the Doe family come within, say, 100 yards once a month just to wave at Baby Richard.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Writer | January 28, 1995
SUITLAND -- In a room filled with adoptive parents and their children, Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday portrayed himself as strongly committed to abortion alternatives.Mr. Glendening highlighted a handful of programs, ranging from family counseling to child support enforcement, that he intends to upgrade to aid families who choose to raise children.The announcement was clearly intended to blunt criticism the governor is receiving for proposing last week to loosen restrictions on abortions for Medicaid recipients.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris | joseph.burris@baltsun.com | January 27, 2010
Michael and Monica Simonsen, the Baltimore couple who have been trying to adopt a Haitian orphan toddler nearly all his life, were scheduled to fly home with him Tuesday evening. Michael Simonsen traveled to Haiti hoping to bring home Stanley Hermane, a 21-month-old who had been at an orphanage for most of his life. Simonsen and a couple of other adoptive fathers were able to bring seven Haitian orphans to the U.S. - far fewer than they expected - from Port-au-Prince early Monday morning.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 12, 2009
For Cockeysville businessman Ron Ryba, the long walk from the parking lot to the stadium in Philadelphia was a 29-year trail of memories. He had come to meet the son he and his high school sweetheart had never dared to look at when they gave him up for adoption nearly three decades earlier. Now, the baby was a grown man. What would he say to him? What would he look like? For Phil Bloete, too, the 2004 meeting at a Phillies game, was the culmination of a lifelong dream. He was 28, a high school English teacher in New Jersey.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.