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By Johnny Rosenstein and Johnny Rosenstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 6, 2003
LUBBOCK, Texas - When it comes to college basketball coaches, Bob Knight is in an elite ensemble. Only two coaches have more national titles. Only one other has played on and coached a national championship team. Last night, Knight was taking one more step toward the Division I career victory record. Knight claimed his 800th victory as Texas Tech (13-5, 3-4) topped Big 12 rival Nebraska, 75-49, at United Spirit Arena. Andre Emmett led the Red Raiders with 24 points while Kasib Powell added 16. Knight became the fifth men's coach and fourth in Division I to reach the 800-win plateau, joining Dean Smith (879)
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SPORTS
December 19, 2009
Kentucky coach John Calipari doesn't agree with Bobby Knight that college basketball lacks integrity or that he is proof there is a problem. Calipari refused to get into a war of words Friday when asked about the pointed criticism from Knight that Calipari's continued employment proves the game has a problem. Instead, Calipari said he remains a "big fan" of the former Texas Tech and Indiana head coach. "I don't agree with what he says, but it doesn't change how I feel about him," Calipari said.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 9, 1991
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -- When Dean Smith's first team at the University of North Carolina won eight of 17 games during the 1961-62 season, there were some around here who didn't want him to get a chance for No. 9."They hung him in effigy a couple of times," said Frank McGuire, Smith's predecessor at North Carolina.Tonight, when the fifth-ranked Tar Heels play Maryland in a building named after the 59-year-old coach, he will be going after No. 700. Smith will try to become the sixth Division I coach in history to reach that mark.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- As Texas quarterback Vince Young was finishing a news conference in a hotel ballroom one morning last week, a group of men in their 60s sat at a dais down the hall relating to what Young and the Longhorns had done the previous night at the Rose Bowl. Like Young, who had led the then-second-ranked Longhorns to a last-second upset of favored Southern California in college football's national championship game, these men had accomplished the athletic highlight of their lives - as basketball players at little Texas Western College.
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 16, 1993
Bob Knight idolized Henry Iba, had him to practice whenever possible, made him a special assistant coach for the 1984 U.S. men's Olympic basketball team.Eddie Sutton welcomed Iba into the gym at Oklahoma State, listened to him, took his suggestions, wrote down his thoughts.Don Haskins tried to bring Iba into El Paso, Texas, every fall, had him watch practice at UTEP and evaluate his players because, Haskins said, "Coach Iba has never been wrong."Henry "Hank" Iba, the second-winningest coach in college basketball history, the head coach of three U.S. Olympic basketball teams and still influencing college basketball coaches, died yesterday at age 88 in Stillwater, Okla.
SPORTS
December 19, 2009
Kentucky coach John Calipari doesn't agree with Bobby Knight that college basketball lacks integrity or that he is proof there is a problem. Calipari refused to get into a war of words Friday when asked about the pointed criticism from Knight that Calipari's continued employment proves the game has a problem. Instead, Calipari said he remains a "big fan" of the former Texas Tech and Indiana head coach. "I don't agree with what he says, but it doesn't change how I feel about him," Calipari said.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 13, 2006
Texas Western College and its men's basketball coach, Don Haskins, helped open a lot of doors back in 1966 by fielding the first all-black starting lineup in an NCAA tournament championship game. So we are told in Glory Road ... and told, and told, and told. But Glory Road never shows us much of anything, either on or off the basketball court. It tells us all kinds of stuff, about the racial inequities these young players had to overcome, about the bravery they exhibited, about the relentless methods their coach used to motivate them.
SPORTS
By Monica Lewis and Monica Lewis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2000
NEW YORK - Dottie Phelan wanted to make the trip to New York last night to see her husband, Jim Phelan, coach his record 1,276th game for Mount St. Mary's. She said a win wasn't important, but reaching the milestone was. Phelan thought it would be best for Dottie to miss the journey to the Big Apple. As it turns out, Dottie Phelan didn't miss much, at least not after Phelan was honored for staking his claim as the NCAA's all-time leader in games coached. His Mountaineers fell to Columbia, 56-44, at Levien Gymnasium.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 22, 1991
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- The shots fell for Kansas right from the start. From inside the lane, from outside the three-point line. Layups off steals, jumpers off screens, stick-backs off offensive rebounds.The Jayhawks, efficient on offense and relentless on defense, poured it on Indiana in the first half of last night's second Southeast Regional semifinal game of the National Collegiate TC Athletic Association tournament. The Hoosiers never recovered.In one of the most awesome displays by Kansas this season, and one of the most awful defensive showings by Indiana, the third-seeded Jayhawks crushed the second-seeded and favored Hoosiers, 83-65, before 23,287 at Charlotte Coliseum.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | January 17, 2003
EMMITSBURG - In about 90 minutes yesterday, Jim Phelan gave us one more trip through his 49-year coaching career at Mount St. Mary's. Oh, what a wonderful ride. He marched in Eisenhower's inaugural parade in the 1950s as a Marine and won a national championship at La Salle. He took us through seven college presidents, 10 U.S. presidents, about a dozen assistant coaches, five children and 11 grandchildren. We laughed when he talked about overcoming prostate cancer and how Fred Carter became the first African-American at the school.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 13, 2006
Texas Western College and its men's basketball coach, Don Haskins, helped open a lot of doors back in 1966 by fielding the first all-black starting lineup in an NCAA tournament championship game. So we are told in Glory Road ... and told, and told, and told. But Glory Road never shows us much of anything, either on or off the basketball court. It tells us all kinds of stuff, about the racial inequities these young players had to overcome, about the bravery they exhibited, about the relentless methods their coach used to motivate them.
SPORTS
By Johnny Rosenstein and Johnny Rosenstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 6, 2003
LUBBOCK, Texas - When it comes to college basketball coaches, Bob Knight is in an elite ensemble. Only two coaches have more national titles. Only one other has played on and coached a national championship team. Last night, Knight was taking one more step toward the Division I career victory record. Knight claimed his 800th victory as Texas Tech (13-5, 3-4) topped Big 12 rival Nebraska, 75-49, at United Spirit Arena. Andre Emmett led the Red Raiders with 24 points while Kasib Powell added 16. Knight became the fifth men's coach and fourth in Division I to reach the 800-win plateau, joining Dean Smith (879)
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | January 17, 2003
EMMITSBURG - In about 90 minutes yesterday, Jim Phelan gave us one more trip through his 49-year coaching career at Mount St. Mary's. Oh, what a wonderful ride. He marched in Eisenhower's inaugural parade in the 1950s as a Marine and won a national championship at La Salle. He took us through seven college presidents, 10 U.S. presidents, about a dozen assistant coaches, five children and 11 grandchildren. We laughed when he talked about overcoming prostate cancer and how Fred Carter became the first African-American at the school.
SPORTS
By Monica Lewis and Monica Lewis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2000
NEW YORK - Dottie Phelan wanted to make the trip to New York last night to see her husband, Jim Phelan, coach his record 1,276th game for Mount St. Mary's. She said a win wasn't important, but reaching the milestone was. Phelan thought it would be best for Dottie to miss the journey to the Big Apple. As it turns out, Dottie Phelan didn't miss much, at least not after Phelan was honored for staking his claim as the NCAA's all-time leader in games coached. His Mountaineers fell to Columbia, 56-44, at Levien Gymnasium.
SPORTS
By Chicago Tribune | November 21, 1993
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -- They were all the rave three years ago, those former high school All-Americans who had enrolled at North Carolina. They were heralded as the greatest class ever, as future national champions, as the latest legends to appear on that mythical strip of asphalt known to all as Tobacco Road.No superlative was too outrageous for this quintet, that is how it ++ was back then, and each was variously lauded for his size or his artistry or his precocious basketball acumen. "But the minute we got there, I'll never forget this," remembers forward Pat Sullivan, a member of that group.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
Richmond, Va.-- For Clarence "Bighouse" Gaines, the first half was like old times. Exhorting his players as he slowly paced the sidelines of the Richmond Coliseum, Gaines' Winston-Salem State University team was leading by five and playing well against heavily favored Elizabeth City.But in the end there was no Cleo Hill to drill the long-range jumper. There was no Earl "The Pearl" Monroe spinning into the lane, working his magic. This night would end with "Bighouse" spending most of the second half sunken in his seat, with alternating gazes at the action on the court and the scoreboard clock.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
Richmond, Va.-- For Clarence "Bighouse" Gaines, the first half was like old times. Exhorting his players as he slowly paced the sidelines of the Richmond Coliseum, Gaines' Winston-Salem State University team was leading by five and playing well against heavily favored Elizabeth City.But in the end there was no Cleo Hill to drill the long-range jumper. There was no Earl "The Pearl" Monroe spinning into the lane, working his magic. This night would end with "Bighouse" spending most of the second half sunken in his seat, with alternating gazes at the action on the court and the scoreboard clock.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- As Texas quarterback Vince Young was finishing a news conference in a hotel ballroom one morning last week, a group of men in their 60s sat at a dais down the hall relating to what Young and the Longhorns had done the previous night at the Rose Bowl. Like Young, who had led the then-second-ranked Longhorns to a last-second upset of favored Southern California in college football's national championship game, these men had accomplished the athletic highlight of their lives - as basketball players at little Texas Western College.
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 16, 1993
Bob Knight idolized Henry Iba, had him to practice whenever possible, made him a special assistant coach for the 1984 U.S. men's Olympic basketball team.Eddie Sutton welcomed Iba into the gym at Oklahoma State, listened to him, took his suggestions, wrote down his thoughts.Don Haskins tried to bring Iba into El Paso, Texas, every fall, had him watch practice at UTEP and evaluate his players because, Haskins said, "Coach Iba has never been wrong."Henry "Hank" Iba, the second-winningest coach in college basketball history, the head coach of three U.S. Olympic basketball teams and still influencing college basketball coaches, died yesterday at age 88 in Stillwater, Okla.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 22, 1991
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- The shots fell for Kansas right from the start. From inside the lane, from outside the three-point line. Layups off steals, jumpers off screens, stick-backs off offensive rebounds.The Jayhawks, efficient on offense and relentless on defense, poured it on Indiana in the first half of last night's second Southeast Regional semifinal game of the National Collegiate TC Athletic Association tournament. The Hoosiers never recovered.In one of the most awesome displays by Kansas this season, and one of the most awful defensive showings by Indiana, the third-seeded Jayhawks crushed the second-seeded and favored Hoosiers, 83-65, before 23,287 at Charlotte Coliseum.
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