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Adolf Hitler

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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 2003
A federal judge in Washington has all but brought to a close a 20-year fight over the ownership of four watercolors signed by Adolf Hitler and a huge archive of photographs, some used by prosecutors at the post-war Nuremberg trials. The ruling, a 26-page decision issued May 30 by U.S. District Judge Henry H. Kennedy Jr., leaves the works in the possession of the U.S. government. The archive holds 2.5 million images of Germany dating to the 1860s and includes many glamorized pictures of Hitler, some showing him rehearsing his grandiloquent oratory.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 25, 2013
"If history were to repeat itself," warned President Franklin D. Roosevelt in his 1944 State of the Union address, "and we were to return to the so-called normalcy of the 1920s, then it is certain that even though we shall have conquered our enemies on the battlefields abroad, we shall have yielded to the spirit of fascism here at home. " The "normalcy" of the 1920s that Roosevelt referred to was a time of peace and prosperity. The decade began with Republican President Warren Harding commuting the sentences of political prisoners jailed by the Wilson administration, including the socialist leader Eugene Debs.
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NEWS
By George F. Will | October 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Don't judge a book by its cover. But begin judging Ron Rosenbaum's book by its brilliant dust jacket, which features an old, grainy black-and-white photograph of a cherubic infant, less than a year old, dressed in a white gown with a ruffled collar, staring at the camera with wide, dark eyes, his delicate lips slightly parted, a look of mild curiosity on his round face. How did this small bundle of potentialities become Adolf Hitler?In "Explaining Hitler: The Search for the Origins of His Evil," Mr. Rosenbaum, a novelist and literary journalist, takes readers on a mind-bending tour of "the garden of forking paths" in "the trackless realm of Hitler's inwardness."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Charles H. "Harry" Heinlein, a young Army machine-gunner who survived the D-Day landing on Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944, and returned 60 years later, died Saturday of pneumonia at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Violetville resident was 90. Mr. Heinlein was a 22-year-old private from Baltimore attached to the famed 29th Division when he landed on Omaha Beach at 7:40 a.m. June 6, 1944, as part of what Supreme Allied Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower called the "Great Crusade" that would eventually liberate Europe's millions from the domination of Adolf Hitler.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,Special to the Sun | November 19, 2000
The essential message in Ian Kershaw's epic, two-volume biography of Adolf Hitler -- easily the best ever written -- is the uniqueness of the Nazi catastrophe. The man who seduced the German people of his generation, rendering them complicit in unspeakable horrors, was unique. So was the Nazi state he created, the World War he instigated and the Holocaust he unleashed against the Jews of Europe. "Unique" is a word that should be used warily. The dictionary defines the word as "one and only ... having no like or equal ... unparalleled."
NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 6, 2001
Baltimore County Council will approve a needed new jail as long as it is in Baltimore City or, better yet, Pennsylvania. In redistricting, Towson gets three Council members and Woodlawn-Randallstown none. So what's wrong with that? The president will protect the environment of any state where a brother of his is in need of re-election. Adolf Hitler is not funny. Mel Brooks is really not funny. Nathan Lane is funny.
NEWS
August 17, 1993
BERLIN -- Robert M. W. Kempner, a 93-year-old legal scholar who was hounded from Germany by the Gestapo but returned to prosecute Nazi war criminals at the Nuremberg tribunal, died Sunday in his home near Frankfurt.Mr. Kempner helped to convict Hermann Goering, Rudolf Hess, Albert Speer, Martin Bormann and Joachim von Ribbentrop was also among the first to call for the arrest of Adolf Hitler -- in 1931, even before the Nazi leader came to power.Although in poor health in recent months, Mr. Kempner, using the credibility of his success in bringing the Nazi leadership to judgment at Nuremberg, called for an international tribunal to bring similar charges against politicians and generals responsible for war crimes in the former Yugoslavia.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | January 10, 1992
HERNDON, Va. -- How good a speaker is Detroit Lions coach Wayne Fontes?Eric Williams, the Washington Redskins defensive lineman who played for Fontes in Detroit before being traded last year, said Fontes is so passionate and forceful in his speeches that he compares him to Adolf Hitler."
NEWS
By McClatchy News Service | May 1, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- With piercing blue eyes, a computer graphic of Adolf Hitler tells players in an underground video game that they have been "promoted" for running a skillful Nazi death camp and efficiently gassing the "parasites" from the German population.In a chilling commercialization of the Holocaust and an exploitation of computer game technologies, a game centered on the killing of concentration camp prisoners is one of scores of anti-Jewish and anti-Turk games now circulating among computer software users in Austria and Germany.
NEWS
By Geoffrey Fielding | February 28, 1994
GUARDING THE FUHRER: Sepp Dietrich, Johann Rattenhuber and the Protection of Adolf Hitler. By Blaine Taylor. Pictorial Histories Publishing Co., Missoula, Mont. 276 pages. Illustrated. $19.95.I HAVE two memories of Alan Morgenstern, a schoolmate in Britain and Jewish refugee from Nazi Germany. The first is his bragging about the super-highways in Germany, all built under Adolf Hitler. They were so much better than those in Britain, he said. The second is a picture of him in the school magazine.
NEWS
By Shireen Younus | May 10, 2011
Osama Bin Laden's death reminds me of a middle school essay competition I participated in last fall. It was titled: If you could choose to go back in time and witness any historic event, which event would it be and why? Thinking of the agony of Sept. 11, back then, I chose to go back in time and observe World War II through the eyes of one of history's most notorious murderers, Adolf Hitler. Recently, I was astonished to learn the May 2, 1945, headline of "Star and Stripes" stating: "Hitler Dead.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2010
A Baltimore circuit judge postponed the trial for a man with a tattoo of Adolf Hitler on his midsection, who is accused of beating a 76-year-old black fisherman at a city park. Calvin Lockner, 28, faces charges of armed carjacking and armed robbery in what authorities have called a racially motivated attack at Fort Armistead Park in South Baltimore. Lockner and co-defendant Zachary Watson, now 18, who faces the same charges, were scheduled to go to trial today. Watson has told police he did not participate in the beating of James Privott.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | January 11, 2010
Marie Isabelle Ewing, who witnessed the coming of World War II in Germany and later settled in Baltimore, died of a blood clot Jan. 3 at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. The former Homeland resident was 92. Born Marie Isabelle vom Rath in Berne, Switzerland, she was the daughter of an American mother and a German father, who was a lieutenant in the German army during World War I. As an infant, she lived through the war with her mother and grandparents in Frankfurt, Germany.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | June 26, 2009
The head of an Anne Arundel County Republican women's group has apologized for a Web posting comparing President Barack Obama to Adolf Hitler, after the posting received national attention on blogs and cable television news. Joyce E. Thomann, president of the Republican Women of Anne Arundel County, wrote in a letter on the group's Web site that "Obama and Hitler have a great deal in common in my view. Obama and Hitler use the 'blitzkrieg' method to overwhelm their enemies. FAST, CARPET BOMBING intent on destruction.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2009
theater 'Antebellum': Scarlett O'Hara and Adolf Hitler - separated at birth? This world premiere by Robert O'Hara improbably melds history and fiction. The play is set in 1939 when the world was at war and the premiere of Gone With the Wind took place in Atlanta. It runs through April 26 at Woolly Mammoth Theatre, 641 D St. N.W., Washington. Showtimes vary. Tickets are $26-$60. Call 202-393-3939 or go to woollymammoth.net. Mary Carole McCauley art 'Sacred Stitches': Sacred Stitches, an exhibit featuring historic vestments from the collection of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, will be on display through Sept.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | September 21, 2008
Tonight, when the fanfare is complete and the final pitch is thrown, either to or by an Oriole, the light standards towering above Yankee Stadium in the Bronx will go dark. And 85 years of baseball - starting with Babe Ruth's three-run homer in the park's opener, April 18, 1923, and finishing with an anticlimactic regular-season contest between two American League East also-rans - will come to an end. Tonight's Orioles-New York Yankees game is likely the last sporting event to be held in the old stadium at the corner of East 161st Street and River Avenue, a sports cathedral that also hosted legendary NFL and college football games and prizefights.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | September 20, 1992
WEIMAR, Germany -- The self-proclaimed fuehrer of th Deutsche Nationale Partei has adopted the harsh, hacking, spluttering style of Adolf Hitler, whom he greatly admires.His name is Thomas Dienel, and he doesn't mind being called a Nazi."Adolf Hitler was one of the greatest men that ever was in the world," he says. "History will determine who is the greatest. For me, he was the greatest."One day a week ago, Mr. Dienel came to address the faithful in a restaurant hideaway on a hilltop with a spectacular view of the Saale valley about 30 miles south off here.
NEWS
By Blaine Taylor | August 2, 1994
TODAY MARKS the 60th anniversary of the death of German Reich President Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg and a crucial turning point for chancellor Adolf Hitler.The death of the only man Hitler is said to have feared gave the Nazi unbridled power to advance his evil desires, resulting in the holocaust. The 87-year-old field marshal died in his sleep at 9 a.m. on Aug. 2, 1934. By noon that day, in a pre-arranged deal with the Army and Hindenburg's son, Oskar, Hitler announced that the offices of president and chancellor had been combined in his person, and that his new title was Fuhrer (Leader)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | October 5, 2007
Here's a proposal for Landmark Theaters before the national art-house chain opens the Harbor East cinemas Nov. 2: Make one of the seven screens a revival house. In the days before home video and Turner Classic Movies, revival theaters were a mainstay of thriving movie markets. Their programmers offered casual fans and die-hard movie lovers alike the kinds of services that can't be found in mail-rental catalogs and video stores. And I don't just mean seeing movie classics where they belong, on the big screen - though that is a huge selling-point.
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