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By ANDREW BARD SCHMOOKLER | May 24, 1995
Broadway, Virginia -- The other day I heard about the program in Maryland to require high school students to do community service in order to graduate. For some students, we're told, this requirement has been a godsend: The sense of involvement they got from working in, say, a home for the elderly, or in a day-care center, gets them off the path to nowhere and enables them to complete high school.This story helped crystallize my thinking about why adolescence seems to be such a problem in our society.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Dr. Ghislaine D. "Ghilly" Godenne, a psychiatrist and a Belgian baroness who was the founder of the Adolescent Psychiatric Clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital and later was director of Johns Hopkins University Counseling and Psychiatric Services, died Saturday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Roland Park Place. She was 89. Ghislaine Andree Flore Dudley Godenne was born the fourth of seven children in Brussels, Belgium. She was the daughter of a Belgian orthopedic surgeon and a British Red Cross volunteer who met at a French hospital during World War I and married the day the war ended.
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NEWS
April 2, 1996
Laurel Regional Hospital, 7300 Van Dusen Road, will offer a baby-sitting class for adolescents at 9 a.m. April 20.The five-hour program covers safety, proper handling of an infant and basic first aid.The cost is $25.Information: (301) 497-8736.Police logNorth Laurel: 10000 block of N. 2nd St.: Someone pried a garage door and stole tools between 7: 15 p.m. Thursday and 8 a.m. Friday.North Laurel: 9600 block of Barrel House Road: A 1985 Chevrolet Camaro with Maryland tags YPC-675 was stolen between midnight and 7 a.m. Thursday.
FEATURES
By Zach Sparks, For The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Mixing kids and coffee is typically ill advised, but in the case of Brian and Holly Gray, the combination has yielded pleasant results. Last August the couple opened Creating Unlimited Possibilities — CUPs — Coffeehouse in Southwest Baltimore's Hollins Market community to give disconnected youth a chance to gain basic job and life skills. Like the Rev. C.W. Harris, who was profiled in a previous Sun article, their work was awarded a $15,000 grant by BMe (Black Male Engagement)
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilsonand Dr. Alain Joffe | December 18, 1990
Q: Is it safe for my 14-year-old daughter to use diet pills to lose a few pounds?A: We are not in favor of adolescents using over-the-counter diet pills, even though some 10 percent of eighth grade girls have done so within the last year, according to the National Adolescent School Health Survey. The evidence on the success of such pills is scanty. If there are any positive results, they are limited to the first few weeks of use. Used in excess, these pills can have serious side effects.More important, however, is the whole issue of perceptions of body size among adolescents.
NEWS
April 28, 1998
ANOTHER small college town. Another shattered community. Another pubescent murder suspect wearing a vacant stare in the back seat of a patrol car.After two youths were charged in the slayings of a teacher and four classmates in Jonesboro, Ark., a month ago, the question was, "How could this happen?"But after another middle-schooler, witnesses say, shot a teacher in the head Friday, then walked coolly into a school dance to open fire, the question now becomes, "How can we stop this?"Andrew Wurst, 14, of Edinboro, Pa., who is charged in the homicide, had told others at James W. Parker Middle School that he was going to the dance to "kill some people."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 1, 2010
Dr. James Jaquet Gibbs, a retired Sheppard Pratt psychiatrist who founded its children's and adolescents' program, died of a stroke Sunday at Franklin Square Hospital Center. He was 86 and lived in Oakcrest Village in Parkville. Born and raised in Naperville, Ill., he was a graduate of Naperville High School. During World War II, he was assigned by the Army to take courses at Texas Agriculture and Mining University, Stanford University and Grinnell College. He earned a medical degree from Wayne State University in Detroit.
NEWS
By Kelly D. Patterson and Kelly D. Patterson,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 13, 2000
Patrick Wyatt enjoys being a bum. The 15-year-old loves to kick back on the couch, grab his trusty remote control and watch really bad television shows. It doesn't even matter what it is. A soap opera or "Sesame Street." Anything will do. Whenever he musters up the energy, he drags himself to his computer, where he plays video games the rest of the day. And by the time "The Three Stooges" signs off the air at 11 p.m., he's in bed. He emerges 11 or 12 hours later, and the whole routine starts over again.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | December 8, 1992
Q: My son had a physical for high school basketball. They checked his urine and found a little bit of protein. Should we worry?A: Chances are there is nothing wrong with your son's health, but we would need some additional information to reassure you completely.Sometimes, protein in the urine can be a sign of kidney problems. Some teen-agers, however, will have a bit of protein in the urine after exercising. Even in the absence of exercise, it is not unusual for otherwise healthy adolescents to have a small amount of protein in their urine; the cause of this is unknown.
NEWS
November 17, 1995
Dr. James R. Gallagher, 92, a pioneer in teen-age health care, died Nov. 10 of cancer in Lexington, Mass. In 1960, Dr. Gallagher published the first textbook devoted to adolescents' medical problems.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 13, 2012
Baltimore's school children call her "The Sex Lady," and during the four decades Deborah Roffman has taught them about their bodies, the only thing that hasn't changed is the discomfort of their parents when they try to talk about sex. Even the sex has changed, becoming casual and transactional, invasive and pervasive. Marketing and advertising have driven the mercury higher. Technology has put sex only a touch or a keystroke away. "The boundaries that used to separate children's lives from adults' lives have in many respects vanished," said Ms. Roffman, who has taught at Park School for 38 years and often teaches at other independent schools locally and nationwide.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 13, 2011
Dr. James Patrick Connaughton, a psychiatrist who was the founder and first director of what became the Johns Hopkins Children and Adolescent Mental Health Center, died Sunday of pancreatic cancer at his Cloisters home in the Woodbrook neighborhood of Baltimore County. He was 80. The son of a government worker and a shopkeeper, Dr. Connaughton was born and raised in Dublin, Ireland. After graduating from Rockwell College, a Tipperary boarding school, he entered University College in Dublin, where he earned his medical degree in 1956.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Propped up on her elbows while lying on her bed with cell phone in hand, the teen on a poster looks troubled as she reads this text message: "Sry I gt mad n lost cntrl last nyt. " The confused young woman in the poster is poised to accept her boyfriend's apology for abusing her on their date the night before, explained Annie Louise Burton, who took the reins of the Domestic Violence Center of Howard County on Jan. 31. But such forgiveness can...
NEWS
By Sonia Kumar | December 1, 2010
"Mary is a seventeen year old girl. … Mary's mother died when Mary was eight years old. … Following her mother's death, Mary was placed in the custody of a family friend. She was sexually abused beginning at the age of 9 and raped when she was 11. Mary started to run away, drink alcohol and smoke marijuana. Mary first became involved with the juvenile justice system shortly after the death of the man Mary believed to be her father. … Since 2006, Mary has spent 400 days in secure detention and one year in a psychiatric residential treatment center.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 1, 2010
Dr. James Jaquet Gibbs, a retired Sheppard Pratt psychiatrist who founded its children's and adolescents' program, died of a stroke Sunday at Franklin Square Hospital Center. He was 86 and lived in Oakcrest Village in Parkville. Born and raised in Naperville, Ill., he was a graduate of Naperville High School. During World War II, he was assigned by the Army to take courses at Texas Agriculture and Mining University, Stanford University and Grinnell College. He earned a medical degree from Wayne State University in Detroit.
HEALTH
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2010
Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among youths age 10 to 17 in Anne Arundel County, according to a health department report released Monday. The report, "Adolescent Suicide: An Assessment of Adolescent Suicide," reviewed rates of adolescent suicide and suicide attempts, gathering information from hospitals, police reports and school health room visits. The leading cause of death among youths in the county was accidental, such as car wrecks, county officials said. There were nine deaths from suicide among youths younger than age 18 in Anne Arundel from 2004 to 2008, according to the study.
NEWS
March 13, 1992
Dr. John O. Meyerhoff, chairman of the board of Parents Anonymous of Maryland, has won the Baltimore City Medical Society's 1991 Annual CommunityService Award.Since becoming the agency's chairman in 1986, Dr. Meyerhoff has raised funds for the agency, worked to increase public awareness and understanding of child abuse and neglect, and increased the professional staff.He also helped develop Adolescents Coping Together, a network of supportgroups for troubled adolescents that now operates in 21 Baltimore public schools.
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