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Adolescent Pregnancy

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NEWS
By Janet B. Hardy | December 11, 1991
THERE IS good news and bad with respect to the enormously costly and socially destructive problem of adolescent pregnancy in Baltimore.As reported in The Evening Sun Nov. 26, births to school-age mothers declined during the most recent two-year period (1989-1990) for which data are available. It is really good news that, at long last, there may be a break in the slow but steady increase in births to adolescents. Moreover, the decrease is most marked among the youngest and most vulnerable girls, those from 10 to 15 years old.The statistics from the Governor's Council on Adolescent Pregnancy indicate that the risk of pregnancy among adolescents has decreased.
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NEWS
October 2, 2005
The Savage branch library, 9525 Durness Lane, will sponsor a program on credit repair, including tips from experts at the Small Business Administration on how to improve credit scores. The program, part of the series "Libraries Mean Business," will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The series highlights ways the library serves county businesses. The library will sponsor a meeting of its Mystery Book Club at 7 p.m. Oct. 12 to discuss The Talisman, by Stephen King and Peter Straub. The library's Third Wednesday Book Club will meet at 7 p.m. Oct. 19 to discuss Searching for Yellowstone by Paul Scullery.
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NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | March 30, 1992
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's Advisory Council on Adolescent Pregnancy went out of business last week, with a small private luncheon at City Hall and thanks from the mayor.But Mr. Schmoke acknowledged that most of the program the council recommended in a 77-page report will not be started for lack of money. His Advisory Council on Adolescent Pregnancy was disbanded, he added, because "its work is over.""They developed the policy," he said. "We've moved now from policy development to the implementation phase."
NEWS
March 3, 2004
Parents Night at Harper's Choice Middle on Feb. 26 was an adults-only affair. The speaker was Robin Sawyer, who heads the Department of Public and Community Health at University of Maryland, College Park. His topic was "Teens and Us: We're in This Together." The two-hour program covered "what puts teens at risk for early onset of sexual activity, how to talk to your kids about sex, how to protect them," said his wife, Anne Anderson Sawyer. "Sometimes it gets overwhelming until you break it down into manageable pieces and offer some concrete suggestions as to what they can do," Robin Sawyer said.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | March 30, 1992
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's Advisory Council on Adolescent Pregnancy went out of business last week, with a small private luncheon at City Hall and thanks from the mayor.But Mr. Schmoke acknowledged that most of the program the council recommended in a 77-page report will not be started for lack of money. His Advisory Council on Adolescent Pregnancy was disbanded, he added, because "its work is over.""They developed the policy," he said. "We've moved now from policy development to the implementation phase."
NEWS
September 17, 1993
Dr. Joycelyn Elders, the nation's new surgeon general, took office last week having made it clear that she intends to tackle some tough and controversial issues. At the top of her list is the country's epidemic of adolescent pregnancy, a problem Dr. Elders has targeted as a leading cause of poverty and a contributor to many other social ills, from infant mortality to welfare dependency. So far, however, the federal government has found no coherent or effective approach to the issue.One of the first challenges facing the new surgeon general is to define a national agenda for facing up to a problem that is putting increasing burdens on state and local governments.
NEWS
September 9, 1993
Most public discussions about the health of American teen-agers center around sex and drugs. But beyond the discouraging statistics on adolescent pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases and drug use is a broader story of medical neglect. As federal officials plan a strategic -- and overdue -- shift in efforts to curb adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, they should use these programs to improve health care to adolescents across the board.Dr. Joycelyn Elders, newly confirmed by the Senate as the nation's chief medical officer, has a good grasp of the ills facing American young people.
NEWS
September 18, 1993
In New York City, officials tired of replacing street signs from such famous thoroughfares as Broadway and Wall Street decided to manufacture replicas to sell as souvenirs. What began as an effort to counteract petty vandals has earned the city's Department of Transportation $60,000 over the past two years.Rather than paying to have several tons of animal waste carted away each day, the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle simply composts the stuff and markets it to gardeners as "ZooDoo," earning $20,000 a year for the city's general fund.
NEWS
November 27, 1997
DURING HER seven years as executive director of the Governor's Council on Adolescent Pregnancy, Bronwyn Mayden was never afraid to experiment.It was under her leadership that signs on buses offered such tantalizing messages as: "Virgin: Teach your kids it's not a dirty word." Or a picture of a smiling young couple with the caption, "Abstinence makes the heart grow fonder."It is impossible to document exactly how such public awareness campaigns affect behavior, but during her tenure, teen pregnancy rates began to drop.
NEWS
November 24, 1990
Efforts to deal with teen-age pregnancy have long been flawed by lack of attention to young males. Yet teen-age sex and pregnancy are not just the concern or responsibility of young girls.Fortunately, Maryland authorities concerned with children and youth have recognized this gap in the system. New programs in pregnancy prevention now include males. Here's why:Nationwide in 1987, at least 105,364 teen-age boys became fathers and 85,637 babies were born to parents who were both teens, according to the Governor's Council on Adolescent Pregnancy.
NEWS
February 10, 2003
Students and parents filled Centennial High School's media center Thursday night for a discussion of "Teenage Dating and Sexuality." The forum was sponsored by HC DrugFree, a coalition of parents, schools and county agencies. The forum delivered a warning: Howard County kids are having unprotected sex and getting pregnant, said Kathy Siltanen, charge nurse at the county Health Department's Teen Clinics. "Emergency contraception - that's a booming business," she said. "Every time I pick up the paper, I read that teen pregnancy is down, which astounds me because I'm busier than ever," Siltanen said.
NEWS
November 15, 1999
On teen pregnancy, the state's efforts have really paid offThanks for The Sun's article "Better message on teen pregnancy" (Nov. 9). Many dedicated individuals and organizations work with teen-agers to encourage healthy decision-making, so it is no wonder that Maryland's teen-age birth rate is declining faster than the national average.The state's efforts to address teen-age pregnancy began in 1976 and continue today with the governor's Council on Adolescent Pregnancy's mass media and grassroots initiatives.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1999
Jamie Roberts knows the price her mother and older sister paid for getting pregnant as teen-agers. And at age 16, she doesn't intend to follow in their footsteps. "I told myself I would never have to worry about that," said Roberts, who will be a junior at Kenwood High School in Essex and is president of an unusual club at the school that focuses on teen-age sexual abstinence. This spring, Roberts teamed with Michele Hax Fite, a social worker with the Baltimore County Department of Social Services.
FEATURES
February 9, 1999
FEWER TEENS are having sex and fewer teens are having babies, the latest health statistics say, meaning these worrisome numbers have been in steady decline for about a decade now.Happy news indeed, until you look up from the pages of these reports and see that the United States has double the teen birth rate of England, nearest the United States on the list of industrialized countries."
NEWS
November 27, 1997
DURING HER seven years as executive director of the Governor's Council on Adolescent Pregnancy, Bronwyn Mayden was never afraid to experiment.It was under her leadership that signs on buses offered such tantalizing messages as: "Virgin: Teach your kids it's not a dirty word." Or a picture of a smiling young couple with the caption, "Abstinence makes the heart grow fonder."It is impossible to document exactly how such public awareness campaigns affect behavior, but during her tenure, teen pregnancy rates began to drop.
NEWS
October 18, 1996
Dr. Peter F. Pasternack, 50, a cardiologist who broke ground in the study of the risks of surgery, died Monday in New York of coronary artery disease. He was recognized as an expert in assessing the risks posed by heart disease to patients about to undergo surgery on their aorta and the carotid arteries.Dr. Pasternack pioneered a preliminary screening procedure that involved stress test exercises and a noninvasive method of assessing the performance of the heart's lower left chamber.He was a clinical associate professor of medicine, teaching medical students and residents at New York University Medical Center.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1996
Dr. Henry Foster, President Clinton's never-withdrawn nominee for surgeon general, told a Baltimore audience yesterday that efforts to bring down the U.S. teen pregnancy rate are being hampered by a "conservative element" that "preaches that knowledge is dangerous."Foster, whose nomination was derailed by a Republican-led filibuster last year over his performing of abortions, said teachers are "browbeaten and harassed" when they try to teach adolescents about sexuality.Partly as a result, he said, the U.S. teen birth and abortion rates remain many times higher than in other industrialized nations -- even those where girls on average become sexually active at an earlier age. In most of those countries, "family life" programs are integral parts of elementary and secondary school curriculum, he said.
NEWS
February 10, 2003
Students and parents filled Centennial High School's media center Thursday night for a discussion of "Teenage Dating and Sexuality." The forum was sponsored by HC DrugFree, a coalition of parents, schools and county agencies. The forum delivered a warning: Howard County kids are having unprotected sex and getting pregnant, said Kathy Siltanen, charge nurse at the county Health Department's Teen Clinics. "Emergency contraception - that's a booming business," she said. "Every time I pick up the paper, I read that teen pregnancy is down, which astounds me because I'm busier than ever," Siltanen said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1996
Dr. Henry Foster, President Clinton's never-withdrawn nominee for surgeon general, told a Baltimore audience yesterday that efforts to bring down the U.S. teen pregnancy rate are being hampered by a "conservative element" that "preaches that knowledge is dangerous."Foster, whose nomination was derailed by a Republican-led filibuster last year over his performing of abortions, said teachers are "browbeaten and harassed" when they try to teach adolescents about sexuality.Partly as a result, he said, the U.S. teen birth and abortion rates remain many times higher than in other industrialized nations -- even those where girls on average become sexually active at an earlier age. In most of those countries, "family life" programs are integral parts of elementary and secondary school curriculum, he said.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | June 9, 1996
IMAGINE THAT a governor, frustrated by the rising costs of social problems, took a very bold step by banishing buzzwords and the kind of thinking they inspire.There could be no more fuzzy calls to ''strengthen families,'' no more endless discussion of ''systems reform'' or ''service integration.'' Instead, the governor would require specific objectives for dealing with social problems.Sure, state agencies could work to strengthen families, but only as a means toward an end. They could reform systems or integrate services or even empower communities, but only in pursuit of specific objectives.
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