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Adolescent Medicine

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By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2004
Dr. Felix Pierpont Heald, who established the adolescent medicine program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and directed the program for two decades, died Tuesday during heart surgery at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Annapolis resident was 82. A pioneer in what was a new field when was he was starting out in medicine in the 1950s, Dr. Heald once noted that teenagers were a unique and often neglected group - one with special medical needs that often requires psychological attention as well.
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NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2004
Dr. Felix Pierpont Heald, who established the adolescent medicine program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and directed the program for two decades, died Tuesday during heart surgery at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Annapolis resident was 82. A pioneer in what was a new field when was he was starting out in medicine in the 1950s, Dr. Heald once noted that teenagers were a unique and often neglected group - one with special medical needs that often requires psychological attention as well.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilsonand Dr. Alain Joffe | January 22, 1991
Q: Our 9-year-old is driving us all crazy by cracking his knuckles. How can we get him to stop?A: Many school-age children have patterned motor habits that they repeat when under stress or during certain activities, such as watching TV.If the habit is well-established, repeated reminders to stop often draw the child's attention to the habit and make it even more compulsive. Yell- ing or pleading will not make this habit 'N disappear.If your son really wants to stop, ask him to come up with a plan.
NEWS
August 12, 2004
On August 10, 2004, FELIX PIERPONT HEALD, at University of Maryland Hospital in Baltimore, beloved husband of Mary Sutton Heald; devoted father of Anne, Deborah, Chris, Jennifer and Wendy and stepfather to Parker and Jay. Dr. Heald is also survived by grandchildren Chris, Juliet, Drew, Bo, Haley, Samantha, Emory and Connor. He was predeceased by his wife of 49 years Jean Truslow Heald. Dr. Heald was a pioneer of the field of adolescent medicine. Heald was Professor Emeritus at the University of Maryland Medical School, Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at George Washington University, Pediatrician-in-Chief at Children's National Medical Center, and President of the Society of Adolescent Medicine.
NEWS
August 12, 2004
On August 10, 2004, FELIX PIERPONT HEALD, at University of Maryland Hospital in Baltimore, beloved husband of Mary Sutton Heald; devoted father of Anne, Deborah, Chris, Jennifer and Wendy and stepfather to Parker and Jay. Dr. Heald is also survived by grandchildren Chris, Juliet, Drew, Bo, Haley, Samantha, Emory and Connor. He was predeceased by his wife of 49 years Jean Truslow Heald. Dr. Heald was a pioneer of the field of adolescent medicine. Heald was Professor Emeritus at the University of Maryland Medical School, Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at George Washington University, Pediatrician-in-Chief at Children's National Medical Center, and President of the Society of Adolescent Medicine.
FEATURES
By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Contributing Writers | July 20, 1993
Q: My baby is just beginning to walk. His feet don't look straight. His doctor said he'd grow out of it; but when I went to the shoe store, the salesman sold us "special" shoes with a wedge in them. Who's right?A: Most babies' feet point slightly outward when they start to walk. We suspect that's what you are talking about when you say the feet are not straight. If so, your baby's doctor gave you the same advice we would.Time, not special shoes, will solve the problem.If a child is wearing special shoes as this natural change takes place, the parent and the shoe salesman may believe the shoes were the cure.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe | August 13, 1991
Q. My sons are 8 and 10 and seem excessively frightened of insects.A. Most children have had the unpleasant experience of being stung. Insects can be unsettling, especially at night when children tend to be worried and frightened by the dark.Your children have reached an age when they may be somewhat skeptical of your reassurances and need to find things out for themselves. Study insects with your children. Good books at their reading levels are available. Science centers and museums of natural history usually have excellent displays with explanations.
FEATURES
By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | February 8, 1994
Q: In church last Sunday, I noticed that the infant next to us slept throughout the entire service. When I commented to the child's mother how great it was that he was quiet during the service, she proudly said she gave him a drugstore cold medicine. She said it works like a charm. Is it safe?A: Let us say at the outset that we would not recommend using medication to control infant behavior in church. In fact, we're hard-pressed to think of any occasion, except for a necessary medical procedure, when a child should be artificially sedated.
HEALTH
By Dr. Modena Wilsonand Dr. Alain Joffe | October 16, 1990
Q**What is the proper bedtime for a 3-year-old?A**Children vary in how much sleep they need and how it fits into the family schedule, so there's no magic hour for bed.You can tell whether your daughter's getting enough sleep by her behavior during the day. Is she difficult to wake up and grumpy in the morning? Do you have to push her to get her ready? Does she seem to lack energy and excitement? Is she drowsy during the day? Do you find her asleep unexpectedly? Is she irritable and demanding during the evening?
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilsonand Dr. Alain Joffe | February 5, 1991
Q: At what age can my teen-age daughter start douching?A: We are not in favor of douching at any age. The vagina has built-in physiologic defense mechanisms that usually protect it from infections. Douching offers no additional advantage.Some women douche because they note a change in the odor, amount, or color of their vaginal discharge. Often these changes are quite normal and would resolve without any additional action.However, a change in odor, color, or amount of discharge can be an important sign that an infection is present, especially if the young woman is sexually active.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 1996
What's the difference between a sprain and a strain? I've been reading a lot about the Orioles' Jeffrey Hammonds' knee sprain and the possibility of ligament damage. But when my 15-year-old daughter had a strained knee from running track, the doctors seemed more concerned about her bones.We suspect a lot of people are confused about the two words, and to make sure we could answer your question correctly, we verified our information in a sports medicine text.The answer to your question has two parts: As you implied, a strain is not the same thing as a sprain, and there are important differences between adults on the one hand and children and adolescents on the other in terms of how these injuries can affect them.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | June 14, 1994
Q: My 10-year-old loves to ride his bicycle, but he doesn't want to wear a helmet in the summer when it's hot. Does he really need it? He only rides on the sidewalk and is a very good rider.A: Your son should wear his helmet whenever he rides. The helmet should be an approved bicycle helmet, fit snugly and be strapped on firmly.We recommend that you make no compromises when such an important safety issue is involved. The fact that your son is a good rider and rides often increases rather than decreases his risk.
FEATURES
By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | February 8, 1994
Q: In church last Sunday, I noticed that the infant next to us slept throughout the entire service. When I commented to the child's mother how great it was that he was quiet during the service, she proudly said she gave him a drugstore cold medicine. She said it works like a charm. Is it safe?A: Let us say at the outset that we would not recommend using medication to control infant behavior in church. In fact, we're hard-pressed to think of any occasion, except for a necessary medical procedure, when a child should be artificially sedated.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | January 4, 1994
Q: My 17-year-old daughter has bad migraine headaches. Recently, her doctor gave her an injection of a new drug called sumitriptan. It worked great! Although it comes prepackaged in a device that allows the medicine to be injected by her, she panics at the thought of doing it and we have had to give her the shots ourselves. Any idea on what we can do?A: Since sumitriptan is not currently available in a pill form, we can certainly understand the urgency you and your daughter feel in her learning how to administer this effective medication herself.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | December 14, 1993
Q: We've just had a new baby. She's sleeping through the night, but our 2-year-old daughter is waking up. What should we do?A: A new baby is a big event in the life of your older child -- probably the biggest she has ever experienced. It's predictable that she will be upset, even if she doesn't express it directly, and her routines will be upset, too. Let's face it. The baby is competition for your time and affection. When your toddler wakes up in the night, she probably wonders if you are busy with the baby instead of with her.Make certain that your 2-year-old gets some "special time" with each of you during the day. It doesn't have to be long -- 10 minutes will do -- but it must be her time totally, uninterrupted by the demands of the baby.
FEATURES
By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Contributing Writers | July 20, 1993
Q: My baby is just beginning to walk. His feet don't look straight. His doctor said he'd grow out of it; but when I went to the shoe store, the salesman sold us "special" shoes with a wedge in them. Who's right?A: Most babies' feet point slightly outward when they start to walk. We suspect that's what you are talking about when you say the feet are not straight. If so, your baby's doctor gave you the same advice we would.Time, not special shoes, will solve the problem.If a child is wearing special shoes as this natural change takes place, the parent and the shoe salesman may believe the shoes were the cure.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | June 14, 1994
Q: My 10-year-old loves to ride his bicycle, but he doesn't want to wear a helmet in the summer when it's hot. Does he really need it? He only rides on the sidewalk and is a very good rider.A: Your son should wear his helmet whenever he rides. The helmet should be an approved bicycle helmet, fit snugly and be strapped on firmly.We recommend that you make no compromises when such an important safety issue is involved. The fact that your son is a good rider and rides often increases rather than decreases his risk.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe | May 21, 1991
Q: Our 2-year-old has learned a swear word. The first few times she said it, we thought it was cute.But now its use is getting frequent and quite embarrassing. How can we get her to stop?A: Your initial amusement taught your daughter the word is fun to say. She may have noticed extra emphasis the word got when one of you used it. After all, she heard it somewhere!If you laughed and remarked on her use of the word, or even just raised your eyebrows the first time she used it, she got a reward -- attention -- which she regards as entirely positive.
FEATURES
By Maryalice Yakutchik and Maryalice Yakutchik,Contributing Writer | January 5, 1993
State-of-the-art scans won't alert Dr. Marianne Felice if a 14-year-old patient is having unprotected sex. No gleaming machine will clue her into a 16-year-old's eating disorder.In fact, technology often falls flat when it comes to uncovering the high-risk behaviors that are contributing to a worsening adolescent health problem.Suicide rates are escalating, especially among white males; homicide rates among black males are alarming; greater numbers of middle-class females are being diagnosed with anorexia and bulimia; and all classes and races are affected by sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, accidents, unplanned pregnancies, obesity, poor self-image and sedentary lifestyles.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | August 7, 1992
Take 10 inner-city children in Baltimore. By the time they're 18 years old, five of them will know someone who has been murdered and five will know someone who has been the victim of armed robbery. Two will have witnessed a murder and four a shooting. One of them will have been assaulted with a weapon, one raped and two had their lives threatened.This is the level of violence that inner-city youths are growing up with, a team of researchers led by University of Maryland pediatrician Jack Gladstein has found.
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