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By PETER H. LEWIS | July 5, 1993
The Apple Macintosh has been the computer of choice for most graphic artists since its introduction in 1984, even though it is only partly compatible with the IBM-style personal computers used in businesses. But with the rise in popularity of Windows software, a growing number of graphic artists are discovering that they can do their jobs just as easily, and in some cases faster and more conveniently, on Intel-based PCs.The best example of this is Adobe Photoshop, long the premier software for editing and processing photographic images on the Macintosh.
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BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A Baltimore County video game developer agreed to pay $75,000 in a settlement after it was accused by an industry trade group of using illegal copies of commercial software products. The Business Software Alliance, which represents the commercial software industry, alleged that Hunt Valley-based BreakAway Ltd., which makes video games for entertainment and training for businesses and the military, and footwear company Aetrex Worldwide Inc. used unlicensed copies of Microsoft and Adobe software.
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BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | December 28, 2006
I recently updated to Adobe Photoshop 4 and am wondering how to stop it from taking over from my Nikon camera software when I try to download new photos from the camera. It seems as though the Nikon software starts OK, but then Photoshop tries to take over, and my computer either slows to a crawl or hangs up. -Bob Buskey, sbcglobal.net I, too, have been greatly perturbed when I installed Adobe's Photoshop Elements and found it kicking in uninvited every time I plugged a camera into a USB or FireWire port.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | December 28, 2006
I recently updated to Adobe Photoshop 4 and am wondering how to stop it from taking over from my Nikon camera software when I try to download new photos from the camera. It seems as though the Nikon software starts OK, but then Photoshop tries to take over, and my computer either slows to a crawl or hangs up. -Bob Buskey, sbcglobal.net I, too, have been greatly perturbed when I installed Adobe's Photoshop Elements and found it kicking in uninvited every time I plugged a camera into a USB or FireWire port.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2001
For years, software publishing giant Adobe has pushed Photoshop Limited Edition as a mid-level image editing program aimed at those who wanted a few professional features without Photoshop 6.0's $600 price tag. Adobe was partially successful: Photoshop LE provided enough sophisticated editing features for serious hobbyists, but the price was a steep deterrent that discouraged all but the most dogged digital photographers. Now, Adobe (www.adobe. com) has dropped that baggage with a powerful, "See Spot Run" version of Photoshop.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 19, 2005
Adobe Systems Inc., maker of Acrobat and Photoshop software, agreed to buy Macromedia Inc. for about $3.4 billion, adding programs that animate Web sites as it prepares for a challenge from Microsoft Corp. Macromedia stockholders will receive 0.69 Adobe share for each of their shares, Adobe said in a statement yesterday. That values Macromedia at $41.86, a 25 percent premium to the closing price Friday. Adobe stock dropped $5.99 yesterday, or 9.8 percent, to $54.77. Macromedia gained $3.27, or 9.7 percent, to $36.72.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2001
PageMaker might have been king of the desktop publishing programs in the early days of home computing, but its reputation has suffered recently. First, QuarkXpress has become the industry leader for serious desktop publishing. Second, many small-business and home users have been able to meet their desktop publishing needs with Microsoft Publisher, which costs about $100. Nevertheless, Adobe (www. adobe.com) has released PageMaker 7.0 ($500), the sequel to 6.5 Plus, with new features in a familiar package.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2002
With the April 15 tax deadline approaching, millions of Americans will pay at least one visit to the IRS Web site to download a missing form in a ubiquitous file format that has quietly revolutionized the way we share electronic documents. The PDF, which stands for Portable Document Format, was created to help publishers and graphic artists create documents that can be transmitted and read or printed - in their original form - by almost anyone with a computer anywhere in the world. Without fanfare, the PDF has become a near-universal medium that bridges the paper and paperless worlds for industry, government and educational institutions.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | January 6, 1996
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks were mixed yesterday as profit warnings from Adobe Systems Inc. and Duracell International Inc. combined with pessimism that the federal budget impasse will be resolved soon.Investors spent most of the day concerned that White House and Congressional negotiators were unable to resolve the budget impasse, driving the Dow Jones industrial average down as much as 40.1 points.Whipsawed by events in Washington, the average later rose 7.59 to 5,181.43 after the House of Representatives voted to recall furloughed federal workers and reopen government offices.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates | December 4, 2000
My question is about the huge size of the digital camera photos that I try to send over the Internet. How I can fix things so that people who get them are not inconvenienced? Some say the picture comes through so large that they can only see one head at a time and need to scroll to see the picture piece by piece. I use Photoshop 5.0 LE. In Photoshop LE youve got the best deal going in picture tweaking. Its just that nobody bothered to show you the one set of commands you need to slim down those excellent high-resolution photos coming out of your camera.
BUSINESS
By JIM COATES and JIM COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 28, 2006
Recently, you responded to a writer who had problems with no sound on the computer. Having experienced the same issue, I think you should remind readers that there is also the old-fashioned dial on some computers that can be accidentally turned and will mute the sound. After I'd gone through a series of steps, this was finally pointed out to me, and I felt rather foolish having missed the obvious. But it was a lesson learned. - Ray Silverman I winced when I read your note, because I had quoted the splendid tech support advice of Sherlock Holmes, which was to look for things so obvious that they get overlooked when one has a problem that defies solution.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 19, 2005
Adobe Systems Inc., maker of Acrobat and Photoshop software, agreed to buy Macromedia Inc. for about $3.4 billion, adding programs that animate Web sites as it prepares for a challenge from Microsoft Corp. Macromedia stockholders will receive 0.69 Adobe share for each of their shares, Adobe said in a statement yesterday. That values Macromedia at $41.86, a 25 percent premium to the closing price Friday. Adobe stock dropped $5.99 yesterday, or 9.8 percent, to $54.77. Macromedia gained $3.27, or 9.7 percent, to $36.72.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 1, 2004
I have two PCs that recently began giving me a message: "PNTVideo.DRV is not found" or has not enough memory. Both computers have Pentium 4 chips and 384 megabytes of RAM. The program then freezes. I previously had no problem with either computer. Your quandary gives me a chance to share a powerful tool available to all Internet users when they encounter jargon. It's called www.google.com. I didn't have an inkling of what was going on when I read your note, so I copied the name of the PNTVideo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | March 13, 2003
A SIDE FROM the software bundled with Micrsosoft Windows, the most ubiquitous program on computers today may be one you barely notice because it does its job so well. It's called Adobe Acrobat Reader. Its job is to display and print documents with the exact typefaces, graphics, photos and layout its creator intended, no matter what kind of computer or printer you're using. If you've used a PC for any length of time, you've probably viewed one of these documents - a user manual, brochure, catalog, form or report - either with Acrobat Reader or with an Acrobat plug-in for your Web browser.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2002
Most digital cameras and scanners come bundled with software that enables you to rotate, brighten and even remove red-eye from your photos. But if you've caught the digital-imaging bug, you might soon outgrow the popular entry-level programs from Arc Soft or Microsoft. That's when you'll want to pick up a copy of Adobe Photoshop Elements 2.0. The second edition of Elements - with its easy-to-follow recipes, well-designed interface, and ultra-basic Web-publishing tools - is an impressive, intermediate-level image-editor for $99, a fraction of the cost of its big brother and the industry's gold standard, Adobe Photoshop 7.0 ($609)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2002
With the April 15 tax deadline approaching, millions of Americans will pay at least one visit to the IRS Web site to download a missing form in a ubiquitous file format that has quietly revolutionized the way we share electronic documents. The PDF, which stands for Portable Document Format, was created to help publishers and graphic artists create documents that can be transmitted and read or printed - in their original form - by almost anyone with a computer anywhere in the world. Without fanfare, the PDF has become a near-universal medium that bridges the paper and paperless worlds for industry, government and educational institutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | March 13, 2003
A SIDE FROM the software bundled with Micrsosoft Windows, the most ubiquitous program on computers today may be one you barely notice because it does its job so well. It's called Adobe Acrobat Reader. Its job is to display and print documents with the exact typefaces, graphics, photos and layout its creator intended, no matter what kind of computer or printer you're using. If you've used a PC for any length of time, you've probably viewed one of these documents - a user manual, brochure, catalog, form or report - either with Acrobat Reader or with an Acrobat plug-in for your Web browser.
BUSINESS
By JIM COATES and JIM COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 28, 2006
Recently, you responded to a writer who had problems with no sound on the computer. Having experienced the same issue, I think you should remind readers that there is also the old-fashioned dial on some computers that can be accidentally turned and will mute the sound. After I'd gone through a series of steps, this was finally pointed out to me, and I felt rather foolish having missed the obvious. But it was a lesson learned. - Ray Silverman I winced when I read your note, because I had quoted the splendid tech support advice of Sherlock Holmes, which was to look for things so obvious that they get overlooked when one has a problem that defies solution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2001
PageMaker might have been king of the desktop publishing programs in the early days of home computing, but its reputation has suffered recently. First, QuarkXpress has become the industry leader for serious desktop publishing. Second, many small-business and home users have been able to meet their desktop publishing needs with Microsoft Publisher, which costs about $100. Nevertheless, Adobe (www. adobe.com) has released PageMaker 7.0 ($500), the sequel to 6.5 Plus, with new features in a familiar package.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2001
For years, software publishing giant Adobe has pushed Photoshop Limited Edition as a mid-level image editing program aimed at those who wanted a few professional features without Photoshop 6.0's $600 price tag. Adobe was partially successful: Photoshop LE provided enough sophisticated editing features for serious hobbyists, but the price was a steep deterrent that discouraged all but the most dogged digital photographers. Now, Adobe (www.adobe. com) has dropped that baggage with a powerful, "See Spot Run" version of Photoshop.
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