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Admiral Boorda

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NEWS
May 19, 1996
WHAT REALLY caused Adm. Jeremy "Mike" Boorda, the Chief of Naval Operations, to commit suicide? Could it really have been because he had worn two little brass "V" buttons without having won them by combat in Vietnam?The answers run deep, buried in the troubles of a Navy that nurtured Mike Boorda's incredible climb from enlisted high school drop-out to top officer of the fleet -- the first "mustang" in history to attain the pinnacle.Those "V" buttons could have been the result of an honest misunderstanding or some darker need for recognition deserved but not granted.
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NEWS
May 26, 1996
Admiral Boorda was a caring leaderThroughout America's history there have surfaced individuals who in their excellence, virtue, ability and sterling integrity climbed over and above their countrymen's expectations.One such individual was Adm. Jeremy ''Mike'' Boorda, dubbed a ''sailor's sailor'' by men and women he commanded and others who knew him. They all looked up to the "Chief" with tremendous pride and deep respect.When my wife and I learned of his suicide, we were shocked and grief-stricken.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1995
The Navy's top admiral sent out an SOS yesterday, warning that Congress should either increase defense spending or cut some of the nation's military missions."
NEWS
By Jeff Stein | May 26, 1996
The week before I left Vietnam in 1969, my bosses rummaged around and came up with a Bronze Star for me, sort of a going away present. The generic citation said I had "distinguished" myself, "in connection with military operations against a hostile force...."Well, that was an artful phrase - "in connection with...." The bald truth was that the only "hostile force" that I really had to worry about in Vietnam was mosquitoes. Like 85 percent of the 2 million soldiers, sailors, and Marines who served in or off the shores of Vietnam between 1962 and 1975, I spent most of my time guarding a desk.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- After 50 years as the global symbol of America's military might, the aircraft carrier may soon be shoved off center stage by a new warship that would be able to rain 500 missiles within a matter of minutes on targets hundreds of miles away, without risking pilots' lives.Prospects for that ship, which is still on the drawing board but could be in the fleet within five years, raise questions about how many new carriers the Navy will need. A carrier costs $4.5 billion to build and $440 million a year to operate.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Eager to steer a new course after the Tailhook sexual harassment scandal, the Navy's new top admiral said yesterday that he would try to accelerate plans to assign women eventually to all ships and submarines.Adm. Jeremy M. Boorda, who took over 10 days ago as chief of naval operations from Adm. Frank B. Kelso II, said that he wants to recruit more women into the Navy, now that women are allowed to servein more than 90 percent of Navy jobs.The number of female recruits has increased to more than 15 percent of all Navy enlisted ranks this year from about 9 percent in 1991.
NEWS
By Richard H.P. Sia and Richard H.P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- When Mike Boorda was a teen-ager and his world at home and school began to crumble, it was the U.S. Navy that took him in, even though he had to lie about his age and use a phony birth certificate to enlist.He was just 16. His parents' marriage was breaking up, and he decided to quit high school just outside Chicago and strike out alone. "I was cool. I was tough. And in truth," he says now, remembering that time, "I was scared to death. Hell, I was 16 years old, and I had nobody to help me."
NEWS
By Gordon Livingston | May 23, 1996
IN MAUPASSANT'S short story, ''A Piece of String,'' the central character, Hauchecorne, is accused of picking up and keeping a wallet lost in the road. He protests that he only found a piece of string, but even after the wallet is returned to its owner by someone else, Hauchecorne cannot shake the opinion of the townspeople that he was somehow involved. He is driven to madness by his inability to prove his innocence.Similar circumstances surrounded the death last week of the Navy's highest-ranking officer, Adm. Jeremy Boorda.
NEWS
By Jeff Stein | May 26, 1996
The week before I left Vietnam in 1969, my bosses rummaged around and came up with a Bronze Star for me, sort of a going away present. The generic citation said I had "distinguished" myself, "in connection with military operations against a hostile force...."Well, that was an artful phrase - "in connection with...." The bald truth was that the only "hostile force" that I really had to worry about in Vietnam was mosquitoes. Like 85 percent of the 2 million soldiers, sailors, and Marines who served in or off the shores of Vietnam between 1962 and 1975, I spent most of my time guarding a desk.
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,Richard O'Mara is The Sun's London correspondent. Some reporting for this article was done by Ian Johnson, who writes for The Sun from Germany | August 2, 1992
London. -- What is the American military mission in Europe now that the anti-Soviet alliance the United States created and led for over 40 years is without a clear adversary?What is NATO's future? Cutting closer to home, does the U.S have a role in any new military structure that develops in Europe? If so, how much of one?These questions address perhaps the most delicate issue in Europe today. That was the word used by a German Foreign Ministry spokesman when they were put to him. Delicate.
NEWS
By Gordon Livingston | May 23, 1996
IN MAUPASSANT'S short story, ''A Piece of String,'' the central character, Hauchecorne, is accused of picking up and keeping a wallet lost in the road. He protests that he only found a piece of string, but even after the wallet is returned to its owner by someone else, Hauchecorne cannot shake the opinion of the townspeople that he was somehow involved. He is driven to madness by his inability to prove his innocence.Similar circumstances surrounded the death last week of the Navy's highest-ranking officer, Adm. Jeremy Boorda.
NEWS
May 19, 1996
WHAT REALLY caused Adm. Jeremy "Mike" Boorda, the Chief of Naval Operations, to commit suicide? Could it really have been because he had worn two little brass "V" buttons without having won them by combat in Vietnam?The answers run deep, buried in the troubles of a Navy that nurtured Mike Boorda's incredible climb from enlisted high school drop-out to top officer of the fleet -- the first "mustang" in history to attain the pinnacle.Those "V" buttons could have been the result of an honest misunderstanding or some darker need for recognition deserved but not granted.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Scott Shane contributed to this article | May 17, 1996
At the U.S. Naval Academy, somber officers and midshipmen paused yesterday afternoon to grieve the death of their leader.Even though he was the first enlisted sailor to rise through the ranks to become the Navy's commander, Adm. Jeremy "Mike" Boorda had a deep affection for the academy and was a regular visitor to Annapolis.Boorda also was remembered as giving an inspiring speech just last month that cheered the beleaguered school in the wake of several embarrassing cases of student wrongdoing.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- After 50 years as the global symbol of America's military might, the aircraft carrier may soon be shoved off center stage by a new warship that would be able to rain 500 missiles within a matter of minutes on targets hundreds of miles away, without risking pilots' lives.Prospects for that ship, which is still on the drawing board but could be in the fleet within five years, raise questions about how many new carriers the Navy will need. A carrier costs $4.5 billion to build and $440 million a year to operate.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1995
The Navy's top admiral sent out an SOS yesterday, warning that Congress should either increase defense spending or cut some of the nation's military missions."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent nTC | May 19, 1994
NORFOLK, Va. -- Straining under Pentagon cutbacks, U.S. military commanders are trying desperately to spare their troops unbearably long family separations as they respond to expanding global crises.The Defense Department is determined not to repeat the experience of the last major defense drawdown, in the late 1970s. That era produced what the Pentagon calls "a hollow force" -- understaffed, poorly equipped and demoralized."We didn't have enough people to do the job, and as we tried to do the job, we ran them into the ground," said Adm. Jeremy M. Boorda, the new chief of naval operations.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Scott Shane contributed to this article | May 17, 1996
At the U.S. Naval Academy, somber officers and midshipmen paused yesterday afternoon to grieve the death of their leader.Even though he was the first enlisted sailor to rise through the ranks to become the Navy's commander, Adm. Jeremy "Mike" Boorda had a deep affection for the academy and was a regular visitor to Annapolis.Boorda also was remembered as giving an inspiring speech just last month that cheered the beleaguered school in the wake of several embarrassing cases of student wrongdoing.
NEWS
May 26, 1996
Admiral Boorda was a caring leaderThroughout America's history there have surfaced individuals who in their excellence, virtue, ability and sterling integrity climbed over and above their countrymen's expectations.One such individual was Adm. Jeremy ''Mike'' Boorda, dubbed a ''sailor's sailor'' by men and women he commanded and others who knew him. They all looked up to the "Chief" with tremendous pride and deep respect.When my wife and I learned of his suicide, we were shocked and grief-stricken.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Eager to steer a new course after the Tailhook sexual harassment scandal, the Navy's new top admiral said yesterday that he would try to accelerate plans to assign women eventually to all ships and submarines.Adm. Jeremy M. Boorda, who took over 10 days ago as chief of naval operations from Adm. Frank B. Kelso II, said that he wants to recruit more women into the Navy, now that women are allowed to servein more than 90 percent of Navy jobs.The number of female recruits has increased to more than 15 percent of all Navy enlisted ranks this year from about 9 percent in 1991.
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,Richard O'Mara is The Sun's London correspondent. Some reporting for this article was done by Ian Johnson, who writes for The Sun from Germany | August 2, 1992
London. -- What is the American military mission in Europe now that the anti-Soviet alliance the United States created and led for over 40 years is without a clear adversary?What is NATO's future? Cutting closer to home, does the U.S have a role in any new military structure that develops in Europe? If so, how much of one?These questions address perhaps the most delicate issue in Europe today. That was the word used by a German Foreign Ministry spokesman when they were put to him. Delicate.
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