Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAdministrative Law Judge
IN THE NEWS

Administrative Law Judge

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 7, 2002
Kenneth H. Moyer, a retired Social Security Administration administrative law judge, died of cancer May 29 at his Timonium home. He was 81. Mr. Moyer began his SSA career in the Office of Hearing Appeals in 1955. He retired from the agency as an administrative judge in 1981. Born and raised in Harrisburg, Pa., he earned his bachelor's degree from Lebanon Valley College. During World War II, he served with the Army Transportation Corps in Europe and the Pacific. He remained in the Army Reserve, attaining the rank of colonel.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
A Baltimore County administrative law judge has approved developer Steve Whalen's proposal for a medical office project in Catonsville, one month after Whalen pleaded guilty to giving illegal campaign contributions to county politicians. Judge John E. Beverungen said the proposed Southwest Physicians Pavilion, planned for Kenwood Avenue near the Beltway, meets the county's zoning laws and complies with its master plan. In January, Whalen pleaded guilty to five counts of violating state election law, admitting he funneled $7,500 to the campaign of County Councilman Tom Quirk - who represents the Catonsville area - by giving money to others to give to Quirk.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | April 16, 1994
Howard County police have charged a state administrative law judge with sexually abusing a 17-year-old foster child, who says he was molested about 30 times during the last seven years.Marvin Lee Teal, 44, of Ellicott City was arrested about 7 p.m. Thursday at his home after an investigation that began in mid-March.Mr. Teal was released on $25,000 bail yesterday afternoon. He was charged with one count of child abuse, one count of assault and battery, one count of second-degree sex offense, one count of third-degree sex offense, two counts of perverted practice and six counts of fourth-degree sex offense.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Allen Dyer's term on the Howard County school board is scheduled to expire Dec. 3, but it could end at any moment. The outspoken Ellicott City lawyer, who lost his attempt for re-election in the primary earlier this year, is battling an attempt by his fellow members to legally oust him from the panel. The due date for a decision from the administrative law judge presiding over his case is Dec. 5. The school board requested last year that the state school board remove Dyer, who has been accused of breaching confidentiality requirements and bullying.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | March 31, 2007
Charles R. Boutin, the beleaguered Public Service Commission member who resigned last month, has been tapped to be an administrative law judge with the Office of Administrative Hearings. Boutin, a Republican member of the House of Delegates between 1999 and 2005, starts work April 4, according to J. Bernard McClellan, an administrative law judge and the organization's deputy director for quality assurance. McClellan said that Boutin was selected by Chief Administrative Law Judge Thomas E. Dewberry, a former colleague of Boutin's in the House.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | October 4, 1991
The Baltimore County Planning Board passed a Towson Community Plan yesterday that would place approval of development projects in the hands of two advisory panels and an administrative law judge.The 60-page plan, which was approved 14-0, spells out where and what type of buildings can be constructed and under what restrictions. It will be the focus of County Council public hearings before the council adopts a final plan by year's end.The result of two years' study and intensive lobbying by developers and community groups, the plan was modified in the past week to address developers' concerns that it largely prohibited future projects.
NEWS
November 20, 2009
The board that oversees physicians in the state voted Wednesday after a lengthy hearing to continue suspending the license of a Towson psychiatrist who is accused of improper conduct with boys in his care. The Maryland Board of Physicians notified Miguel Frontera on Thursday of the continued suspension, which has been in place since early this month. The board began investigating the doctor in April after Baltimore County police passed along reports from two boys who said Frontera touched their genitals during physical exams.
NEWS
October 16, 1992
James M. McIntyre, who retired about a year ago as an administrative law judge for the state and in 1976 as a major in the Baltimore County Police Department, died Wednesday of cancer at his home in Halethorpe.A Mass of Christian burial for Judge McIntyre, 62, is to be offered at 10:30 a.m. tomorrow at the Roman Catholic Church of the Ascension, Potomac and Poplar avenues in Halethorpe.When he retired after 20 years as a police officer, he was the department's legal officer with duties that included liaison to the state legislature and the state's attorney's office.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
Lawyers for the two jail officers facing dismissal for their roles in the Dontay Carter escape went to court yesterday to try to spread the blame for the convicted murderer's freedom flight.An assistant attorney general representing the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services replied that no matter the circumstances, the officers' failure to follow security policies led to the escape and that department policy dictates they be fired.During a hearing before a state administrative law judge, lawyers for the correctional officers, Frank Beales and Irvin Curtis, said Judge John N. Prevas, who presided over Carter's two trials in Baltimore Circuit Court, fostered a tense, hurry-up atmosphere in which the officers dared not question his decision to allow Carter to use the bathroom in the judge's chambers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a move that could delay or deny benefits for tens of thousands of people, the Social Security Administration has told its judges that they should, in most cases, disregard federal court precedents if those rulings conflict with agency policies.The order, issued as the agency faces a huge backlog of disputed claims, has drawn protests from federal courts, members of Congress and agency employees.It is being compared to positions taken in the early 1980s by the Reagan administration, which said it was bound only by Supreme Court decisions and did not have to "acquiesce" in decisions of lower courts that contradicted its reading of the Social Security law.Democrats denounced the Reagan administration's practice as lawless, and the administration took a more moderate position after Congress made clear that it disapproved of the practice.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Oral arguments in the Howard County school board's case against board member Allen Dyer ended Wednesday, with administrative law judge Douglas Koteen setting the close of the case for Sept. 6, the due date for final written arguments. The school board on June 9 of last year requested that the state board of education remove Dyer, accusing him of such transgressions as breaching confidentiality requirements and bullying. The state board referred the matter to the office of administrative hearings, where 10 days of hearings began in May. After the final written arguments, Koteen has up to 90 days to submit a recommended decision to the state board and both parties.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2011
A developer's plan for a 36-unit waterfront condominium with boat slips that has pitted neighbor against neighbor for years in Bowleys Quarters has been rejected by a Baltimore County hearing officer. In a 45-page opinion based on days of hearings, John E. Beverungen denied the Galloway Creek condominium proposed by Milton A. Rehbein III, who for decades has owned a marina at the site along Burke Road on the Bowleys Quarters peninsula. While Beverungen agreed with some of the developers' arguments, he rejected the project on grounds that it conflicts with the county master plan and neighborhood community plan, and violates a law that specifies where such projects are allowed in Bowleys Quarters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
When Pamela Griffith flipped open the book in her prison cell and began to read, she felt an immediate, visceral connection in an environment where personal bonds of any type are in notoriously short supply. "It's funny. You feel a kinship in a certain way," Griffith, 53, told the other inmates participating in an unusual book club that's been running for nearly five years at the Maryland Correctional Institute for Women in Jessup. She leaned forward, and the words flew out of her: "Because her cells did what they did and the researchers did what they did, I'm sitting here today.
NEWS
November 20, 2009
The board that oversees physicians in the state voted Wednesday after a lengthy hearing to continue suspending the license of a Towson psychiatrist who is accused of improper conduct with boys in his care. The Maryland Board of Physicians notified Miguel Frontera on Thursday of the continued suspension, which has been in place since early this month. The board began investigating the doctor in April after Baltimore County police passed along reports from two boys who said Frontera touched their genitals during physical exams.
NEWS
August 13, 2007
Guy James Avery of Baltimore, a former judge for the Maryland Office of Administrative Hearings, died Saturday of colitis at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 68. Mr. Avery, who was born in New York City and grew up there and in Massachusetts, served in the Marine Corps. He attended the University of Maryland, College Park, where he earned an undergraduate degree and was a member of the Delta Sigma Pi fraternity. After moving to Baltimore, he attended night school at the University of Maryland School of Law. Mr. Avery worked in the legal division of the state's Department of Social Services.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | March 31, 2007
Charles R. Boutin, the beleaguered Public Service Commission member who resigned last month, has been tapped to be an administrative law judge with the Office of Administrative Hearings. Boutin, a Republican member of the House of Delegates between 1999 and 2005, starts work April 4, according to J. Bernard McClellan, an administrative law judge and the organization's deputy director for quality assurance. McClellan said that Boutin was selected by Chief Administrative Law Judge Thomas E. Dewberry, a former colleague of Boutin's in the House.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1995
David D. Merrill, a retired state administrative law judge, died Tuesday of pneumonia at Howard County General Hospital. He was 73 and had lived in Randallstown for the past 20 years.Mr. Merrill counted former Gov. William Donald Schaefer among his friends, and they were members of the Gourd Heads Club."Their motto is: 'Big Heads Full of Brains,' " said Mr. Merrill's wife of 44 years, the former Shirley Clark."He was a very bright, young man who had a quick wit," said retired Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Mary Arabian.
NEWS
June 7, 2002
Kenneth H. Moyer, a retired Social Security Administration administrative law judge, died of cancer May 29 at his Timonium home. He was 81. Mr. Moyer began his SSA career in the Office of Hearing Appeals in 1955. He retired from the agency as an administrative judge in 1981. Born and raised in Harrisburg, Pa., he earned his bachelor's degree from Lebanon Valley College. During World War II, he served with the Army Transportation Corps in Europe and the Pacific. He remained in the Army Reserve, attaining the rank of colonel.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.