Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAdministrative Law
IN THE NEWS

Administrative Law

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
A Baltimore County administrative law judge has approved developer Steve Whalen's proposal for a medical office project in Catonsville, one month after Whalen pleaded guilty to giving illegal campaign contributions to county politicians. Judge John E. Beverungen said the proposed Southwest Physicians Pavilion, planned for Kenwood Avenue near the Beltway, meets the county's zoning laws and complies with its master plan. In January, Whalen pleaded guilty to five counts of violating state election law, admitting he funneled $7,500 to the campaign of County Councilman Tom Quirk - who represents the Catonsville area - by giving money to others to give to Quirk.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
A Baltimore County administrative law judge has approved developer Steve Whalen's proposal for a medical office project in Catonsville, one month after Whalen pleaded guilty to giving illegal campaign contributions to county politicians. Judge John E. Beverungen said the proposed Southwest Physicians Pavilion, planned for Kenwood Avenue near the Beltway, meets the county's zoning laws and complies with its master plan. In January, Whalen pleaded guilty to five counts of violating state election law, admitting he funneled $7,500 to the campaign of County Councilman Tom Quirk - who represents the Catonsville area - by giving money to others to give to Quirk.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2001
William Richard Merriman, an orphan who rose to become a state administrative law judge, died Tuesday of renal failure at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 73 and had lived in Towson. The fifth of six children, Mr. Merriman was 6 years old when his mother, Jeanette, died of pneumonia. His father, John, was killed in an accident six months later. Young Merriman was sent to Mount Washington to live with an aunt, while his three brothers and two sisters went to other relatives spread across the city.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Allen Dyer's term on the Howard County school board is scheduled to expire Dec. 3, but it could end at any moment. The outspoken Ellicott City lawyer, who lost his attempt for re-election in the primary earlier this year, is battling an attempt by his fellow members to legally oust him from the panel. The due date for a decision from the administrative law judge presiding over his case is Dec. 5. The school board requested last year that the state school board remove Dyer, who has been accused of breaching confidentiality requirements and bullying.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2008
The House of Representatives is expected to vote as early as today on a measure that would dismantle the Coast Guard's administrative law system, stripping the service of its judicial role in prosecuting misconduct and negligence charges against civilian mariners in response to claims of bias in the Baltimore-based courts. The measure would transfer all of the Coast Guard's maritime cases to the National Transportation Safety Board beginning in October. Coast Guard investigators typically bring more than 600 cases each year against professional mariners accused of drug use, incompetence, negligence or other infractions while working on the water.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | May 21, 1993
A Maryland-based arm of the Saudi health ministry that buys supplies for that country's royal hospital may not claim sovereign immunity in fighting a sex discrimination complaint, an administrative law judge has ruled.Royspec Purchasing Services, an agency of the Saudi government based near Baltimore-Washington International Airport, argued in a March hearing that it was immune from the complaint brought by the Maryland Human Relations Commission.A former Royspec purchasing agent, Marian Heymann of Pasadena, charged in 1987 that sex bias by her employer forced her to quit a $40,000-a-year job after six years with the agency.
NEWS
January 15, 1991
10 a.m. -- House and Senate convene, State House.p.m. -- Senate Finance Committee receives briefing on economic development and unemployment insurance issues, Presidential Wing, Senate Office Building.p.m. -- Constitutional and Administrative Law Committee receives briefing by John W. Hardwicke, chief administrative law judge of the Office of Administrative Hearings, Room 140, House Office Building.There are 83 days remaining in the 1991 General Assembly session.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 29, 2009
John Webster Hardwicke, a retired Maryland judge who headed a central hearing agency to resolve conflicts between citizens and the state and also served three terms as the Harford County Council president, died Thursday of pulmonary fibrosis at Harford Memorial Hospital. The Darlington resident was 82. "He was one of the giants in the field of administrative law," said Robert M. Bell, chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals. "He was methodical, a man of keen vision and diligent.
NEWS
November 15, 2007
After reviewing merchant seamen's complaints about the Coast Guard's system for disciplining mariners, a federal judge in New Orleans was blunt in her assessment of the process: It didn't "pass the smell test." The comment by U.S. District Judge Helen G. Berrigan should serve as a warning to Coast Guard officials who have defended the process against charges that it has been neither fair nor unbiased. It may be time to clean house. Judge Berrigan made her remarks last week in connection with a lawsuit filed by three mariners who challenged the Coast Guard's administrative law process, a civil proceeding that hears evidence against mariners charged with drug use, misconduct, negligence or other violations on the water.
NEWS
By From staff reports | April 11, 2002
In Maryland $3.7 million fine upheld in aloe vera case ANNAPOLIS - The Court of Special Appeals has upheld a $3.7 million fine against a Baltimore company that sold aloe vera and the mineral cesium chloride as cures for AIDS and cancer. T-Up Inc. and its principals, Allen J. Hoffman and Neal Deoul, were found by an administrative law judge and a Baltimore County Circuit judge to have violated the state's consumer protection laws with false advertising. The fine, originally levied by the administrative law judge, was upheld this week by the state's second highest court.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
Jim Nicholas lay in a hospital bed recovering after a heart procedure when his attorney called with life-changing news: The Social Security Administration would pay him more than $206,000 in disability benefits, bringing an end to his nine-year court battle. Ever since he began suffering from heart failure, Nicholas and his wife, Yvonne, had been trying to prove he was sick enough to get benefits from the agency, which not only administers Social Security but provides support for those too disabled to work.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Oral arguments in the Howard County school board's case against board member Allen Dyer ended Wednesday, with administrative law judge Douglas Koteen setting the close of the case for Sept. 6, the due date for final written arguments. The school board on June 9 of last year requested that the state board of education remove Dyer, accusing him of such transgressions as breaching confidentiality requirements and bullying. The state board referred the matter to the office of administrative hearings, where 10 days of hearings began in May. After the final written arguments, Koteen has up to 90 days to submit a recommended decision to the state board and both parties.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2011
A developer's plan for a 36-unit waterfront condominium with boat slips that has pitted neighbor against neighbor for years in Bowleys Quarters has been rejected by a Baltimore County hearing officer. In a 45-page opinion based on days of hearings, John E. Beverungen denied the Galloway Creek condominium proposed by Milton A. Rehbein III, who for decades has owned a marina at the site along Burke Road on the Bowleys Quarters peninsula. While Beverungen agreed with some of the developers' arguments, he rejected the project on grounds that it conflicts with the county master plan and neighborhood community plan, and violates a law that specifies where such projects are allowed in Bowleys Quarters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
When Pamela Griffith flipped open the book in her prison cell and began to read, she felt an immediate, visceral connection in an environment where personal bonds of any type are in notoriously short supply. "It's funny. You feel a kinship in a certain way," Griffith, 53, told the other inmates participating in an unusual book club that's been running for nearly five years at the Maryland Correctional Institute for Women in Jessup. She leaned forward, and the words flew out of her: "Because her cells did what they did and the researchers did what they did, I'm sitting here today.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 29, 2009
John Webster Hardwicke, a retired Maryland judge who headed a central hearing agency to resolve conflicts between citizens and the state and also served three terms as the Harford County Council president, died Thursday of pulmonary fibrosis at Harford Memorial Hospital. The Darlington resident was 82. "He was one of the giants in the field of administrative law," said Robert M. Bell, chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals. "He was methodical, a man of keen vision and diligent.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,Sun reporter | April 25, 2008
The House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly yesterday to dismantle the U.S. Coast Guard's Baltimore-based administrative law system amid charges of bias in its handling of cases against civilian mariners. Part of a sweeping $8.4 billion spending bill that now goes to the Senate, the action strips the Coast Guard of its role in hearing negligence and misconduct cases against seafarers and would transfer those cases to the National Transportation Safety Board in October. The move follows an investigation by The Sun last year showing that mariners prevailed in only 14 of about 6,300 charges brought over eight years.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,Sun reporter | August 1, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Members of Congress called yesterday for the U.S. Coast Guard's administrative court system to be removed from the agency's control and placed within an independent arm of government, saying recent claims of bias and mismanagement have raised doubts within the maritime industry about whether the system is fair to the civilian defendants whose cases it handles. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat and chairman of the House Transportation subcommittee responsible for oversight of the Coast Guard, said he will submit legislation to strip the administrative law system from the Coast Guard, with hopes of having the change implemented by next year.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
Jim Nicholas lay in a hospital bed recovering after a heart procedure when his attorney called with life-changing news: The Social Security Administration would pay him more than $206,000 in disability benefits, bringing an end to his nine-year court battle. Ever since he began suffering from heart failure, Nicholas and his wife, Yvonne, had been trying to prove he was sick enough to get benefits from the agency, which not only administers Social Security but provides support for those too disabled to work.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2008
The House of Representatives is expected to vote as early as today on a measure that would dismantle the Coast Guard's administrative law system, stripping the service of its judicial role in prosecuting misconduct and negligence charges against civilian mariners in response to claims of bias in the Baltimore-based courts. The measure would transfer all of the Coast Guard's maritime cases to the National Transportation Safety Board beginning in October. Coast Guard investigators typically bring more than 600 cases each year against professional mariners accused of drug use, incompetence, negligence or other infractions while working on the water.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.