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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 11, 2002
Del. Thomas E. Dewberry, a Catonsville Democrat and speaker pro tem of the House of Delegates, was named chief administrative law judge yesterday by Gov. Parris N. Glendening. The move had been expected since the end of the legislative session last month, and it continues the exodus of experienced legislators from the Baltimore County delegation. In his new job, Dewberry, 51, will oversee the Office of Administrative Hearings, which hears cases from citizens and businesses with complaints about the actions of state agencies.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Hearings began Monday on claims by BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport's former acting fire chief that he was unfairly terminated earlier this year after raising concerns about racial bias within the department. Gregory Lawrence, who is black, said he believes the Maryland Aviation Administration terminated him in March without due process after he raised concerns about an all-white recruit class. He said he feels the decision also was in retaliation for a previous discrimination case he brought against the department more than a decade ago. "I want to go back to work," Lawrence said Monday morning, prior to the start of several days of hearings scheduled in the case at the Maryland Office of Administrative Hearings in Hunt Valley.
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NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | March 4, 2013
The welcome lifting of the federal consent decree on Baltimore City Public Schools does not mean all is well for students with disabilities in Baltimore and Maryland - far from it. Yet, the General Assembly rarely pays any attention to the fact that special education isn't nearly special enough. Hopefully that will change. Pending legislation gives lawmakers a chance to at least take a small step to improve the education of students with disabilities. As things now stand, students across the range of disabilities - from intellectual limitations to language impairments to dyslexia - are denied the opportunity to meet academic standards because they are not provided services to which they are entitled under federal and state laws.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
Former Howard County school board member Allen Dyer was turned back Wednesday in his latest attempt to reverse a Maryland State Board of Education decision removing him from office - even though that decision came after his elected term was already over. Dyer, an Ellicott City attorney who lost his bid for re-election in the 2012 primary, has argued that the state board had no authority to adjudicate the case, but Circuit Judge Louis A. Becker disagreed. The decision was the latest in a matter dating to June 2011, when the county school board asked the state body to remove Dyer, alleging such transgressions as "bullying" board members and staff, undermining board functions and breaching confidentiality requirements.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 29, 2009
John Webster Hardwicke, a retired Maryland judge who headed a central hearing agency to resolve conflicts between citizens and the state and also served three terms as the Harford County Council president, died Thursday of pulmonary fibrosis at Harford Memorial Hospital. The Darlington resident was 82. "He was one of the giants in the field of administrative law," said Robert M. Bell, chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals. "He was methodical, a man of keen vision and diligent.
NEWS
January 15, 1991
10 a.m. -- House and Senate convene, State House.p.m. -- Senate Finance Committee receives briefing on economic development and unemployment insurance issues, Presidential Wing, Senate Office Building.p.m. -- Constitutional and Administrative Law Committee receives briefing by John W. Hardwicke, chief administrative law judge of the Office of Administrative Hearings, Room 140, House Office Building.There are 83 days remaining in the 1991 General Assembly session.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | February 26, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Legislators are trying again to strip the state personnel secretary's power to make final decisions in employee grievance cases -- and they're trying to make the effort veto-proof.By a unanimous vote, the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee yesterday approved legislation that would vest final authority in certain grievance proceedings with the state's Office of Administrative Hearings.State employee unions have complained that while employees often get favorable rulings in grievances from hearing officers, Personnel Secretary Hilda E. Ford too often reverses them.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | March 25, 1993
A Baltimore businessman who faced determined opposition from Silver Run residents will not build a pet crematory in an old cannery there after all, state records show.Jerry Rosenbaum withdrew his application to open the crematory, Deputy Chief Judge James G. Klair of the state Office of Administrative Hearings said yesterday.Residents learned of Mr. Rosenbaum's action Tuesday when their attorney forwarded to them a March 5 letter from the Office of Administrative Hearings, which said the application had been withdrawn.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | March 31, 2007
Charles R. Boutin, the beleaguered Public Service Commission member who resigned last month, has been tapped to be an administrative law judge with the Office of Administrative Hearings. Boutin, a Republican member of the House of Delegates between 1999 and 2005, starts work April 4, according to J. Bernard McClellan, an administrative law judge and the organization's deputy director for quality assurance. McClellan said that Boutin was selected by Chief Administrative Law Judge Thomas E. Dewberry, a former colleague of Boutin's in the House.
NEWS
August 13, 2007
Guy James Avery of Baltimore, a former judge for the Maryland Office of Administrative Hearings, died Saturday of colitis at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 68. Mr. Avery, who was born in New York City and grew up there and in Massachusetts, served in the Marine Corps. He attended the University of Maryland, College Park, where he earned an undergraduate degree and was a member of the Delta Sigma Pi fraternity. After moving to Baltimore, he attended night school at the University of Maryland School of Law. Mr. Avery worked in the legal division of the state's Department of Social Services.
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | March 4, 2013
The welcome lifting of the federal consent decree on Baltimore City Public Schools does not mean all is well for students with disabilities in Baltimore and Maryland - far from it. Yet, the General Assembly rarely pays any attention to the fact that special education isn't nearly special enough. Hopefully that will change. Pending legislation gives lawmakers a chance to at least take a small step to improve the education of students with disabilities. As things now stand, students across the range of disabilities - from intellectual limitations to language impairments to dyslexia - are denied the opportunity to meet academic standards because they are not provided services to which they are entitled under federal and state laws.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Ignoring pleas from union leaders and the county's Annapolis delegation, the Baltimore County Council approved a bill Tuesday changing how county employees can appeal decisions about retirement benefits. The council voted 6-1 in favor of the bill, proposed by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. Councilwoman Vicki Almond, a Reisterstown Democrat, was the only member of the council to oppose it, saying it will put county employees "through unnecessary hardship, both economically and procedurally.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2013
Baltimore County labor leaders plan to fight legislation by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz that would change the way public workers appeal county decisions on their retirement benefits, saying the bill would stack the deck against employees. The bill, pending before the County Council, would give cases involving benefit disputes to administrative law judges appointed by the county executive and make other changes to the appeal process. Those cases now are heard by the Board of Appeals, whose members are appointed by the County Council.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
An administrative law judge on Wednesday ruled that former Howard County school board member Allen Dyer committed "misconduct in office," and upheld the county school board's request to remove him from the panel, even though Dyer's term ended Monday. The county school board voted in June 2011 to ask the state Board of Education to remove Dyer, accusing him of breaching confidentiality requirements and bullying. The state board sent the matter to the Office of Administrative Hearings, which ultimately was to make a recommendation.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Allen Dyer's term on the Howard County school board is scheduled to expire Dec. 3, but it could end at any moment. The outspoken Ellicott City lawyer, who lost his attempt for re-election in the primary earlier this year, is battling an attempt by his fellow members to legally oust him from the panel. The due date for a decision from the administrative law judge presiding over his case is Dec. 5. The school board requested last year that the state school board remove Dyer, who has been accused of breaching confidentiality requirements and bullying.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Oral arguments in the Howard County school board's case against board member Allen Dyer ended Wednesday, with administrative law judge Douglas Koteen setting the close of the case for Sept. 6, the due date for final written arguments. The school board on June 9 of last year requested that the state board of education remove Dyer, accusing him of such transgressions as breaching confidentiality requirements and bullying. The state board referred the matter to the office of administrative hearings, where 10 days of hearings began in May. After the final written arguments, Koteen has up to 90 days to submit a recommended decision to the state board and both parties.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | July 16, 2000
More than books filled the law library at the offices of Gordon, Feinblatt, Rothman, Hoffberger & Hollander. Cool jazz notes from the Frederick Douglass High School Quartet, mouth-watering aromas of hors d'oeuvres, and reminiscences of famous civil rights legal battles also occupied the space -- as did some 110 guests at a reception for the 16th annual NAACP Continuing Legal Education Program. The party's purpose was to hand out "Foot Soldiers in the Sand" Awards to Maryland lawyers Samuel Hamilton, Mark A. Darden III, Adrianne C. Jemmott and Stuart Jay Robinson for going beyond the call of duty in helping NAACP members and local citizens.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
An administrative law judge has denied Allen Dyer's request to block his removal from the Howard County school board, setting in motion proceedings that would have Dyer defending his seat next year as he runs for re-election. The Howard school board passed a resolution June 9 to request that the Maryland State Board of Education remove Dyer, citing his repeated filing of lawsuits against the board and accusing him of, among other things, violating confidentiality agreements and bullying board members.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 29, 2009
John Webster Hardwicke, a retired Maryland judge who headed a central hearing agency to resolve conflicts between citizens and the state and also served three terms as the Harford County Council president, died Thursday of pulmonary fibrosis at Harford Memorial Hospital. The Darlington resident was 82. "He was one of the giants in the field of administrative law," said Robert M. Bell, chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals. "He was methodical, a man of keen vision and diligent.
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