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NEWS
May 24, 2013
It is interesting that the Obama administration (and I am sure Attorney General Eric Holder knows nothing about this either) is going after a Fox News reporter, but nothing has been done about the White House leaks of the "hit list" for drones or the cyber attack on Iran ("U.S. targeted Fox reporter in spy case, records show," May 21). The latter two were much more dangerous than the North Korean issue to national security, but they have been underreported and forgotten. Shame on all reporters.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Carol A. MacPhail, who had been an administrator and art teacher at Friends School and Bryn Mawr School, died Wednesday of breast cancer at her Lutherville home. She was 71. The daughter of Norbert Albert Witt, who had been president of Noxell, and Cecile R. Porter Witt, a homemaker, the former Carol Ann Witt was born in Detroit. She spent her early years in Evanston, Ill., and Greenwich, Conn., before moving to Homeland in 1954 with her family. She was a 1961 graduate of Friends School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1965 from the University of Maryland, College Park and a master's degree in 1977 in fine arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art . In 1989, she earned a master's degree in guidance and counseling from the Johns Hopkins University.
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NEWS
May 19, 2014
I'm bothered and bewildered by columnist Jules Witcover's recent commentary ( "Beating the dead horse called Benghazi," May 12). He spouts the administration talking points that it is time to move on to more immediate problems, then goes on a rant about Republicans beating a dead political horse. After that he refers to Joe McCarthy and to Republicans wailing over who lost China and Vietnam. Am I in an alternate universe? What does any of this have to do with Benghazi? The reason it is still embroiled in controversy is that the administration has delayed, obfuscated and downright lied from immediately after the tragedy until the present.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The state's Mental Hygiene Administration didn't have adequate procedures to ensure consumers given care were eligible, according to audit by the Department of Legislative Services during fiscal 2013. The state funds in question totaled $16.4 million. The total budget that year was $788 million when federal funds were counted. The audit also found reviews weren't done in a timely manner by an accounting firm hired to monitor some of the agency's fiscal functions, with some reviews taking up to an extra 21 months.
SPORTS
January 31, 2013
The problems cited by the article "VA falls short on helping veterans" (Jan. 27) regarding the Veterans Affairs Department's huge delays in processing disability payments raises another question regarding how well it administers its responsibility for providing health care to our veterans in general. Why is there a need for the "Wounded Warriors" organization that constantly solicits donations from the public? Isn't this the clearest indication of the VA's failures and an extreme embarrassment to this administration?
NEWS
May 14, 2013
In Washington, as in any seat of power, most acts of folly begin with hubris. Government leaders, elected or appointed, usually don't intend to do the wrong thing, to overstep or cause harm, but they become so convinced, so certain of their purpose, that they are blinded by their pride. Perhaps that's the root of the problem infecting the Justice Department, where officials secretly obtained months of telephone records of journalists working for the Associated Press. That Attorney General Eric Holder or anyone else there could find that action acceptable is frightening, to say the least.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2012
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, the governor's point man on legislation governing public-private partnerships, said Wednesday that the administration will not risk the measure's defeat over a controversial amendment that could change the rules for appeals in a lawsuit challenging the State Center redevelopment plan in Baltimore. Brown said the amendment, tacked on theĀ  bill in the House Environmental Matters Committee, did not come from the administration. "We neither oppose it nor promote it," he said.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | June 3, 2007
Attorney General Doug Gansler's office issued a news release the other day that referred to the "Gansler Administration." As in, "Protecting and improving the health of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries is a priority of the Gansler Administration." Was there a Curran administration? Gansler's predecessor doesn't think so. "I don't remember using that term," Joe Curran said. Not for lack of trying, at least on the part of former Curran spokesman Kevin Enright. "Despite the fact that time and again I tried to hold Curran administration meetings, they never caught on," Enright said.
NEWS
January 21, 2013
I agree with Vice President Joe Biden's concern about protecting our children from gun violence ("Biden vows swift steps on guns," Jan. 12). But how about our coming together to protect our foreign embassy ambassadors like the late Christopher Stevens and the other brave Americans who tried to save him in Benghazi when our government failed to do so? Also, our how about other foreign diplomats and the American civilians recently kidnapped in Algeria by an al-Qaeda affiliate? And let's not forget our border patrol agents, etc. They all could have been saved if there had been an armed U.S. security person there to confront any threats to these defenseless Americans.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | January 5, 2014
Clint Eastwood fans recall the popular shoot 'em up Western entitled "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. " The moniker fits an Obama-led Washington, circa 2014. Don't believe me? Check it out: The good Despite aggressive overselling of an economic recovery by Democrats, Republicans must recognize a number of positives on the economic front. Consumer spending has improved, and so have the markets. Unemployment has steadily (albeit too slowly) decreased to the "new normal" - around 7 percent.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
If historic tax bills are wrong in the future, at least city property owners will know who to blame. The City Council voted unanimously Monday to give Baltimore's government authority to do the appraisals that determine the size of historic tax credits - essentially stripping state officials of the duty in response to errors that left some property owners with wildly inaccurate bills. The plan, which is expected to get final approval next week, ends months of finger-pointing between state and city officials over who is to blame for the problems.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 8, 2014
As the crystal ball on the 2016 Republican presidential nomination remains cloudy, two-time loser Mitt Romney appears willing at least to entertain the possibility of trying a third time. In addition to occasional comments on matters he knows a lot about, including setting up a health care insurance plan (in Massachusetts) and how to create jobs as well as personal wealth, Mr. Romney has now put on a hat as a defense and foreign policy expert. It's a weapon in his arsenal that he conspicuously lacked in 2012, when he made a mid-campaign trip to Europe and succeeded chiefly ruffling local feathers in Britain, Israel and Poland.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
An anonymous call reporting an armed person holding a hostage at the University of Maryland, College Park prompted campus police to search the Main Administration building and two others Wednesday before declaring the report unfounded. When the call came in at 3:27 p.m., the department evacuated and swept the administration building, which houses the offices of the president and provost, and nearby Lee and Mitchell buildings, police said. Lee and Mitchell contain the bursar and registrar's offices, respectively.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Merreen E. Kelly, a former Baltimore County administrative officer who earlier had been an associate superintendent of Baltimore County public schools, died Sunday at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center of lung cancer. He was 79. The son of Earl Linwood Kelly, a Koppers Co. foundry man, and Helen Marie Wilhem Kelly, a homemaker, Merreen Earl Kelly was born in Baltimore and raised in Arbutus. A 1953 graduate of Towson High School, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1957 in education from what is now Towson University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
J. Paul Gahagan, a retired Social Security Administration disability analyst and an accomplished woodworker, died Sunday at College Manor Nursing Home in Lutherville of complications from an infection. He was 87. James Paul Gahagan - he never used his first name, family members said - was born in Baltimore and raised in East Baltimore. "He grew up on Aiken Street and had many childhood adventures, including walking over the beams of the Howard Street bridge," said a daughter, Kathy Briggs of Stoneleigh.
NEWS
August 9, 2014
As a lifelong Marylander, I am dismayed by the decision to open the coast to seismic testing ( "Some Maryland lawmakers oppose seismic testing," Aug. 4). Maryland's delegation made their message clear in a letter to President Barack Obama: "Keep seismic air guns and oil rigs out of our waters and off the East Coast. " By voicing their opposition to opening up the Atlantic to oil and gas exploration, they join over 200 elected officials from the national, state and local levels of government, including 27 members of Congress from states in the blast zone, an area twice the size of California, from Delaware to southern Florida.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2001
The battle over take-home patrol cars for Baltimore County police officers intensified yesterday when the county auditor responded sharply to a study by the Ruppersberger administration that some County Council members criticized as unfair and too harshly worded. Auditor Brian T. Rowe took the administration to task on several fronts, saying its analysis was unfair because it was based on a hypothetical program that included more officers than initially proposed. "It ... results in an apples-to-oranges comparison," Rowe said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is preparing a broad new effort to weaken Iran by persuading reluctant allies to cut off loans, investments and arms sales to what American officials regard as a permanently hostile government.The plan, drafted as part of an intensive policy review, reflects a conclusion that Iran must be isolated if it is to be prevented from emerging as a substantial threat to Western interests. Thus, the plan rejects Reagan and Bush administration policies that offered to reward Tehran for good behavior.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley joined U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez at a popular burrito restaurant in this Washington suburb Thursday to praise its higher-than-minimum wages and to call for a pay raise for other American workers. The event at Boloco gave O'Malley an opportunity to lend public support to a top priority of President Obama at a time when the governor has been at odds with the administration over how to shelter immigrant children from Central America. Appearing with Perez, Montgomery County Executive Isiah "Ike" Leggett and Boloco chief executive Patrick Renna, O'Malley said the 22-restaurant chain does well by treating its employees well.
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