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By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | December 26, 1991
Washington -- The Dec. 21 New York Times told the deadpan truth in a front-page headline: ''Cuomo Says He Will Not Run for President in '92.'' What the headline lacked was a little spin control. It should have read, ''Cuomo SAYS He Will Not Run for President in '92.''Am I skeptical? You bet. Mario Cuomo's renunciation should be taken with two tons of salt. I have heard this song before. The Mario Scenario hasn't ended.Let me turn the clock back by 40 years. We are now talking about the upcoming presidential election of 1952.
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NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
In a post earlier today , I said that I appreciated John F. Kennedy's having heeded "people like Adlai Stevenson rather than the Joint Chiefs and war hawks during the missile crisis. " By that I meant that Kennedy listened to Stevenson and to people with similar views, not people who held those views but not Stevenson himself, and I am confident that anyone who read the post understood my intention.  So, unless you can produce a reader who did not share that understanding, you "such-as" sticklers can stuff it. 
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NEWS
By JOE STERNE and JOE STERNE,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1996
"The Stevensons" by Jean H. Baker. Norton. 577 pages. $30 For a generation of Americans nurtured in the sheltering presence of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Adlai E. Stevenson's emergence in 1952 as the torchbearer of liberalism created an enthusiasm for political battle among his followers that was never to be repeated.Harry Truman had been an acceptable transitional figure, but his humble roots and plain ways could never match the patrician aura of a Roosevelt or a Stevenson.Yet Stevenson's reputation diminished during his lifetime and it has not been restored in the three decades since his death.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 30, 2003
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State Colin L. Powell will make a compelling case to the United Nations Security Council next week when he outlines the evidence against Iraq, but he is unlikely to produce a "smoking gun" or re-create what has come to be called an "Adlai Stevenson moment," U.S. officials say. In choosing the forum in which Stevenson, the U.S. ambassador, confronted the Soviet Union with evidence of its deception during the Cuban Missile Crisis...
NEWS
By FRANKLIN MASON | November 22, 1993
Her name is Allie and he wore his Adlai tie. They are 80 years apart, she born this year, he turned fourscore this year.It is a high occasion, Allie the centerpiece, he an adjunct in the audience. It is christening time, time for Allie's christening. She is his great great niece, he is her great great uncle, a lot of greatness.He wanted to do the right thing, dress right. He wore what he wore on high occasions. He wore his Adlai tie that said Adlai all over (Stevenson, of course.) The tie went back in time like he himself went back in time.
NEWS
May 1, 1991
Jean Baker, a professor of history at Goucher College inTowson, has received the Newberry Library of Chicago's Lloyd Lewis National Endowment for the Humanites Fellowship.Baker plans to use the award to fund research for her forthcoming book on the public and private lives of four generations of Adlai Stevenson's family.Baker, a resident of McDonogh in the Owings Mills area, has been on the Goucher faculty since 1970.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 21, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 44th in 1956 was a repeat of the 1952 election in many ways. Republicans again nominated Dwight Eisenhower. Democrats again nominated Adlai Stevenson. There was more suspense in the vice-presidential contests. Citing Eisenhower's heart attack of 1955 and intestinal surgery of 1956, some moderate Republicans tried but failed to get Richard Nixon dumped from the 1956 ticket. Stevenson threw the vice-presidential nomination open at the Democratic convention.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 30, 2003
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State Colin L. Powell will make a compelling case to the United Nations Security Council next week when he outlines the evidence against Iraq, but he is unlikely to produce a "smoking gun" or re-create what has come to be called an "Adlai Stevenson moment," U.S. officials say. In choosing the forum in which Stevenson, the U.S. ambassador, confronted the Soviet Union with evidence of its deception during the Cuban Missile Crisis...
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2000
Barbara O'Malley is learning what it means to be the mayor's mom the hard way. A year ago no one was asking her age for publication. ("Can I ask you your age?" "You can, but don't.") No one wanted the scoop on whether Martin was a naughty little boy. (She says no, but the mayor admits that on rare occasions "I felt the back of her hand on my butt.") If a reporter comes to her Rockville home a year from now, Mrs. O'Malley will probably be dressed in slacks or whatever she wears on her day off from working as a receptionist in Senator Barbara Mikulski's office.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 8, 1992
On the night I turned 19, I began to dread turning 30. It became an 11-year exercise in brooding intensely about the inevitable. I wanted to be prepared when it happened. I didn't want to be one of those people who forgets to do his dreading all along, and then has to pull a bunch of all-nighters to catch up on the dreading he skipped.Nobody in my generation particularly wanted to grow up, since the world had made it so delightful for us to be children. First we had Howdy Doody, and later (according to somewhat unreliable sources)
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2002
President Bush's appearance before the United Nations this month to seek its approval for action against Iraq might have been an affirmation of the importance of this international institution or a confirmation of its irrelevance - important because Bush bothered to seek its approval; irrelevant because he pretty much said the United States would do what it had to do, with or without the U.N. What's an international organization to do in a world dominated...
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 16, 2000
It's almost time for the political conventions, which means that millions of concerned U.S. voters will be glued to their TV sets, watching the last few episodes of "Survivor." Some TV viewers will also watch the conventions, but the majority of these will be Labrador retrievers who turned on the TV by biting the remote control and cannot figure out how to change the channel. Very few actual people watch the political conventions anymore. Al Gore could accept the Democratic nomination buck naked, and nobody would notice except maybe Tipper.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2000
Barbara O'Malley is learning what it means to be the mayor's mom the hard way. A year ago no one was asking her age for publication. ("Can I ask you your age?" "You can, but don't.") No one wanted the scoop on whether Martin was a naughty little boy. (She says no, but the mayor admits that on rare occasions "I felt the back of her hand on my butt.") If a reporter comes to her Rockville home a year from now, Mrs. O'Malley will probably be dressed in slacks or whatever she wears on her day off from working as a receptionist in Senator Barbara Mikulski's office.
NEWS
By JOE STERNE and JOE STERNE,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1996
"The Stevensons" by Jean H. Baker. Norton. 577 pages. $30 For a generation of Americans nurtured in the sheltering presence of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Adlai E. Stevenson's emergence in 1952 as the torchbearer of liberalism created an enthusiasm for political battle among his followers that was never to be repeated.Harry Truman had been an acceptable transitional figure, but his humble roots and plain ways could never match the patrician aura of a Roosevelt or a Stevenson.Yet Stevenson's reputation diminished during his lifetime and it has not been restored in the three decades since his death.
NEWS
By FRANKLIN MASON | November 22, 1993
Her name is Allie and he wore his Adlai tie. They are 80 years apart, she born this year, he turned fourscore this year.It is a high occasion, Allie the centerpiece, he an adjunct in the audience. It is christening time, time for Allie's christening. She is his great great niece, he is her great great uncle, a lot of greatness.He wanted to do the right thing, dress right. He wore what he wore on high occasions. He wore his Adlai tie that said Adlai all over (Stevenson, of course.) The tie went back in time like he himself went back in time.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 8, 1992
On the night I turned 19, I began to dread turning 30. It became an 11-year exercise in brooding intensely about the inevitable. I wanted to be prepared when it happened. I didn't want to be one of those people who forgets to do his dreading all along, and then has to pull a bunch of all-nighters to catch up on the dreading he skipped.Nobody in my generation particularly wanted to grow up, since the world had made it so delightful for us to be children. First we had Howdy Doody, and later (according to somewhat unreliable sources)
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 16, 2000
It's almost time for the political conventions, which means that millions of concerned U.S. voters will be glued to their TV sets, watching the last few episodes of "Survivor." Some TV viewers will also watch the conventions, but the majority of these will be Labrador retrievers who turned on the TV by biting the remote control and cannot figure out how to change the channel. Very few actual people watch the political conventions anymore. Al Gore could accept the Democratic nomination buck naked, and nobody would notice except maybe Tipper.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2002
President Bush's appearance before the United Nations this month to seek its approval for action against Iraq might have been an affirmation of the importance of this international institution or a confirmation of its irrelevance - important because Bush bothered to seek its approval; irrelevant because he pretty much said the United States would do what it had to do, with or without the U.N. What's an international organization to do in a world dominated...
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 21, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 44th in 1956 was a repeat of the 1952 election in many ways. Republicans again nominated Dwight Eisenhower. Democrats again nominated Adlai Stevenson. There was more suspense in the vice-presidential contests. Citing Eisenhower's heart attack of 1955 and intestinal surgery of 1956, some moderate Republicans tried but failed to get Richard Nixon dumped from the 1956 ticket. Stevenson threw the vice-presidential nomination open at the Democratic convention.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | December 26, 1991
Washington -- The Dec. 21 New York Times told the deadpan truth in a front-page headline: ''Cuomo Says He Will Not Run for President in '92.'' What the headline lacked was a little spin control. It should have read, ''Cuomo SAYS He Will Not Run for President in '92.''Am I skeptical? You bet. Mario Cuomo's renunciation should be taken with two tons of salt. I have heard this song before. The Mario Scenario hasn't ended.Let me turn the clock back by 40 years. We are now talking about the upcoming presidential election of 1952.
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