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NEWS
By Winnie Hu and Winnie Hu,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 2001
LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. - A New York state environmental agency charged with protecting Lake George is proposing the first use of a herbicide in an Adirondack lake, to fend off an insidious weed that has choked native plants and mired swimmers and boats. Under a proposal by the Lake George Park Commission, about 175 pounds of the herbicide, Sonar, would be applied to 36 of the 28,000 acres of Lake George as early as June. Sonar, which contains the active ingredient fluridone, has been used to kill the weed, Eurasian water milfoil, in New York since 1995, but never in the state-protected Adirondack Park.
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NEWS
By Winnie Hu and Winnie Hu,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 2001
LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. - A New York state environmental agency charged with protecting Lake George is proposing the first use of a herbicide in an Adirondack lake, to fend off an insidious weed that has choked native plants and mired swimmers and boats. Under a proposal by the Lake George Park Commission, about 175 pounds of the herbicide, Sonar, would be applied to 36 of the 28,000 acres of Lake George as early as June. Sonar, which contains the active ingredient fluridone, has been used to kill the weed, Eurasian water milfoil, in New York since 1995, but never in the state-protected Adirondack Park.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 21, 1997
A land conservation group has agreed to pay a Connecticut couple $75,000 to delay, and possibly drop, plans to buy a 55-acre lakeside retreat in the center of the Adirondack Park.New York state officials said the deal, announced Aug. 12, would bolster the state's chances of buying a 15,000-acre wilderness estate in the park, of which the 55-acre tract is a part.The 55-acre parcel, known as Camp Bliss, is in the heart of the larger property, which is owned by Marylou Whitney, an heiress and fixture of Manhattan and Saratoga society.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 16, 1997
ALBANY, N.Y. - For a century, some of the finest whitewater canoeing and trout-fishing rivers in the state have been off-limits to the public because they coursed through Adirondack hardwood forests owned by a succession of timber companies, most recently Champion International Corp.But last week, Champion announced plans to sell all of its 144,000 acres of North Country forest land - the largest block of New York state land to be offered for sale since the state started keeping such records three decades ago, state officials said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 16, 1997
ALBANY, N.Y. - For a century, some of the finest whitewater canoeing and trout-fishing rivers in the state have been off-limits to the public because they coursed through Adirondack hardwood forests owned by a succession of timber companies, most recently Champion International Corp.But last week, Champion announced plans to sell all of its 144,000 acres of North Country forest land - the largest block of New York state land to be offered for sale since the state started keeping such records three decades ago, state officials said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1997
TUPPER LAKE, N.Y. - The New York state Legislature decided last month to build a 750-cell, maximum-security prison on the outskirts of Tupper Lake in the Adirondacks.But the proposed prison has touched off a fierce debate over the future of this mountainous region that has pitted neighbor against neighbor, worker against worker, sibling against sibling.The fight has focused not just on Tupper Lake, but on the entire Adirondack Park, 6 million mostly pristine acres of public and private land that includes 4,000 lakes and ponds, the Hudson River source and the state's highest peaks.
FEATURES
By Newsday | July 26, 1992
Adirondack State Park is 6 million acres big. About the size of Connecticut. Which means nobody can see it all in a weekend, even a long weekend.So when the Adirondacks come to mind for a visit, think specific. There are more than three dozen mountains to climb -- some of the highest east of the Mississippi -- hundreds of trails to hike and about 1,400 lakes within the park boundary, and you can't swim in all of them.Veteran travelers who head this far north in New York plan their destinations and vacations ahead of time.
NEWS
By ALBANY TIMES UNION | March 28, 1997
LONG LAKE, N.Y. - The water in Little Tupper Lake is clear as gin, the spot isolated except for pairs of loons. It is the largest lake owned by a single person in all of New York. And it is for sale.Long Lake Hotel owner Art Young recalls fishing Little Tupper in the early 1980s, catching several 20- and 22-inch brook trout prized as a rare, genetically undiluted strain."It's so pure and beautiful back in there, it's amazing," said Young, pouring draft beer for patrons at his bar. "But 'forever wild's' a crock.
NEWS
By Winnie Hu and Winnie Hu,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 2003
ALBANY, N.Y. -- A swath of wilderness in the heart of the Adirondacks that once captivated Theodore Roosevelt will become state parkland, under an agreement by Gov. George E. Pataki and the Open Space Institute, a conservation group. It is the largest acquisition in the High Peaks region of the Adirondacks in a quarter century. The $8.5 million deal will cover 9,646 acres just southwest of Lake Placid in the best-known and most-heavily hiked section of the 6-million-acre Adirondack Park.
NEWS
By Dina Cappiello and Dina Cappiello,ALBANY TIMES UNION | September 12, 2000
BIG MOOSE LAKE, N.Y. - For fifty years, Big Moose Lake has been the poster child for the slow poisoning of Adirondack waters by acid rain. Big Moose isn't the most acidic lake in New York's vast Adirondack Park. But it's size - 1,266 acres of tea-colored water - has earned it the reputation as the largest lake to die from acid rain. Researchers say 500 of the roughly 2,800 lakes scattered throughout the New York's 6-million-acre park show few signs of animal or plant life. And unless conditions change - mainly by diminishing air pollution generated by power plants hundreds of miles south and west of the mountains - half of the Adirondack lakes could be dead 40 years from now. "Big Moose is a tragedy," said Karen Roy, the project coordinator for the Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation, an affiliate of the state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1997
TUPPER LAKE, N.Y. - The New York state Legislature decided last month to build a 750-cell, maximum-security prison on the outskirts of Tupper Lake in the Adirondacks.But the proposed prison has touched off a fierce debate over the future of this mountainous region that has pitted neighbor against neighbor, worker against worker, sibling against sibling.The fight has focused not just on Tupper Lake, but on the entire Adirondack Park, 6 million mostly pristine acres of public and private land that includes 4,000 lakes and ponds, the Hudson River source and the state's highest peaks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 21, 1997
A land conservation group has agreed to pay a Connecticut couple $75,000 to delay, and possibly drop, plans to buy a 55-acre lakeside retreat in the center of the Adirondack Park.New York state officials said the deal, announced Aug. 12, would bolster the state's chances of buying a 15,000-acre wilderness estate in the park, of which the 55-acre tract is a part.The 55-acre parcel, known as Camp Bliss, is in the heart of the larger property, which is owned by Marylou Whitney, an heiress and fixture of Manhattan and Saratoga society.
FEATURES
By Newsday | July 26, 1992
Adirondack State Park is 6 million acres big. About the size of Connecticut. Which means nobody can see it all in a weekend, even a long weekend.So when the Adirondacks come to mind for a visit, think specific. There are more than three dozen mountains to climb -- some of the highest east of the Mississippi -- hundreds of trails to hike and about 1,400 lakes within the park boundary, and you can't swim in all of them.Veteran travelers who head this far north in New York plan their destinations and vacations ahead of time.
TRAVEL
August 5, 2001
If you thought Pennsylvania's Hershey Park and California's Knott's Berry Farm were pushing it with their edible themes, consider General Mills' new Cereal Adventure. The miniature amusement park, which opened last month in Minnesota's massive and somewhat wacky Mall of America (home to Camp Snoopy and a giant shark tank), has a Cheerios play section, a Lucky Charms Magical Forest and a Cocoa Puffs Canyon, not to mention a Wheaties area where youngsters can get their pictures on the Breakfast of Champions box. Kids can play "chocolate adventure" video games in Cocoa Puffs Canyon, and the Cheerios and Lucky Charms areas have slides that end in giant, simulated bowls of cereal.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 8, 2000
ALBANY, N.Y. - Entering one of the hottest environmental debates in the state, the administration of Gov. George E. Pataki has for the first time called for the dredging of the Hudson River to remove potentially harmful PCBs. For years, the state has been questioning whether more should be done at the bottom of the river, where an estimated 1 million pounds of PCBs remain. The decision to support dredging is a major blow to the General Electric Co., which discharged the PCBs into the river for about 30 years under permits from the state.
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