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By Erica Green, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 15, 2011
City schools and AYP The following elementary and middle schools were the only ones in Baltimore to meet adequate yearly progress goals this year: •Baltimore International Academy •Baltimore Leadership School For Young Women •Calvin M. Rodwell Elementary •Empowerment Academy •Govans Elementary •Hampden Elementary •Hilton Elementary •KIPP Ujima Village Academy ...
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NEWS
May 30, 2012
The announcement this week that the U.S. Department of Education will grant Maryland a waiver from some of the more onerous requirements of the decade-old federal No Child Left Behind Act is welcome news for the state's school reform effort. It means Maryland will be free to set more reasonable goals for student achievement levels and adopt reforms that are necessary to close the gap between its lowest- and highest-performing schools and school districts. Maryland needs a more rational and balanced approach to measuring educational progress, and now it can create one without having to wait for lawmakers in Washington to act. The decade-old NCLB law, passed by Congress with broad bipartisan support, was the signature education initiative of the Bush administrationt.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Anne Arundel Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell says the school system will promptly examine its approaches to educating students after 21 county schools fell short of annual progress measures set forth by federal No Child Left Behind legislation. Recently released Maryland School Assessment results showed that six of the county's elementary schools, 14 middle schools and one charter school failed to meet the adequate yearly progress mark. The figures stood in sharp contrast to the previous year, when all but one elementary school and 14 of 19 middle schools made adequate progress.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | March 16, 2012
City schools released the following congratulations this week: Ten Baltimore City public schools have been recognized by the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) for the academic performance of their students, according to a release sent from city school system.  The schools were recognized by the state for either their performance on the 2011 Maryland School Assessment (MSA)--they had to have made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)-- or the High School Assessment (HSA)
NEWS
March 3, 2010
I am so tired of seeing photographs of people such as Johns Hopkins University President Ronald Daniels and Baltimore schools chief, Andres Alonso reading to elementary school-aged children ("Helping the youngest readers," Mar. 3). I want to see these people sincerely challenged. Put them in a failing middle school classroom. Read to a high school class that is not meeting Adequate Yearly Progress. The photo ops are always the same; these professionals are always seen before sweet-faced first grade students.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | November 15, 2008
Nine Maryland high schools have been removed from the state's watch list after performing well enough to leave a required improvement process, officials said yesterday. Three other schools - in Baltimore City and Frederick and Montgomery counties - have been added to that list, having failed to make "adequate yearly progress" two years in a row. "We've had some nice improvements this year that have been not the result of one year's work in schools, but rather represent what's been happening over several years," said Ronald A. Peiffer, Maryland deputy state school superintendent.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | March 16, 2012
City schools released the following congratulations this week: Ten Baltimore City public schools have been recognized by the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) for the academic performance of their students, according to a release sent from city school system.  The schools were recognized by the state for either their performance on the 2011 Maryland School Assessment (MSA)--they had to have made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)-- or the High School Assessment (HSA)
NEWS
July 20, 2010
Anne Arundel Though Anne Arundel County exceeded statewide scores in reading and math in the Maryland School Assessments, only five of the county's 19 middle schools, or 26 percent, met the state's requirements for adequate yearly progress. Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell said that the high percentage of schools whose scores dropped from the previous year left him "incredibly disappointed." "I have faith in the talented and dedicated people in our schools who work tirelessly for the benefit of our children, but clearly what we are doing is not good enough," Maxwell added.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV | August 17, 2008
Six schools in Howard County fell short of meeting state-ordered progress goals in the past year and were placed on a list of underperforming schools, despite appeals filed by county education officials. The elementary schools were Bollman Bridge in Jessup and Stevens Forest in Columbia. The middle schools were Harper's Choice in Columbia, Patuxent Valley in Jessup, Murray Hill in Laurel and Oakland Mills in Columbia. At Bollman Bridge, students who receive free or reduced-price lunches, and those in special-education programs did not meet the proficiency standard in math, which led to the school's being placed on the Adequate Yearly Progress list.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2011
Five Baltimore City schools are taking Maryland School Assessments this week with hopes of not only increasing their scores, but raising them enough to meet federally mandated achievement targets that will save the jobs of teachers and staff next year. The city school board approved recommendations Tuesday that would replace staff at schools that don't meet achievement targets on standardized tests this year, a measure that led to an intense debate about school upheavals spurred by targets that many education officials say are becoming more unattainable every year.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
When Congress passed the No Child Left Behind Act in 2003, it was hailed as a major breakthrough toward improving American public education and giving the nation's young people the tools they needed to compete successfully in a global marketplace. The law's greatest achievement was to focus attention on the ideas that teachers and principals should be held accountable for students' progress; that failing schools ought not be allowed to continue with business as usual; and that achievement gaps between racial or socioeconomic groups are unacceptable.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
When the strongest vibrations of Tuesday's earthquake struck during the first day of school in Anne Arundel County, students at Wiley Bates Middle School in Annapolis heeded evacuation instructions blared over the public address system and filed out of the building without much commotion. When the students were outside, about a dozen approached Principal Diane Bragdon, asking whether it was a drill. "I guess they thought I could simulate shaking the building or something," said Bragdon.
NEWS
By Erica Green, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 15, 2011
City schools and AYP The following elementary and middle schools were the only ones in Baltimore to meet adequate yearly progress goals this year: •Baltimore International Academy •Baltimore Leadership School For Young Women •Calvin M. Rodwell Elementary •Empowerment Academy •Govans Elementary •Hampden Elementary •Hilton Elementary •KIPP Ujima Village Academy ...
EXPLORE
July 5, 2011
The latest installment of Maryland School Assessment test results were released on the eve of the Fourth of July weekend, and school has been out for nearly a month, so it's hard to imagine very many people are paying close attention.  The Maryland Department of Education is slated to release another round of test results, those for high school students, in the next few weeks during the height of vacation season. The results released last week were for middle and elementary schools, and they showed four Harford County middle schools and two elementary schools are on the list of schools that need improvement.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2011
Widespread cheating on state assessment tests has been uncovered at two Baltimore elementary schools, state and district officials are expected to announce today. Investigators with the state Department of Education found that Maryland School Assessment scores were compromised at Abbottston Elementary in 2009 and at Fort Worthington Elementary in 2009 and 2010, according to city schools CEO Andrés Alonso. The disclosure marks the second time in little more than a year that city school officials have had to acknowledge cheating at schools recognized nationally as models of successful urban education, including one visited by the first lady and the other by the U.S. secretary of education.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2011
Five Baltimore City schools are taking Maryland School Assessments this week with hopes of not only increasing their scores, but raising them enough to meet federally mandated achievement targets that will save the jobs of teachers and staff next year. The city school board approved recommendations Tuesday that would replace staff at schools that don't meet achievement targets on standardized tests this year, a measure that led to an intense debate about school upheavals spurred by targets that many education officials say are becoming more unattainable every year.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
When Congress passed the No Child Left Behind Act in 2003, it was hailed as a major breakthrough toward improving American public education and giving the nation's young people the tools they needed to compete successfully in a global marketplace. The law's greatest achievement was to focus attention on the ideas that teachers and principals should be held accountable for students' progress; that failing schools ought not be allowed to continue with business as usual; and that achievement gaps between racial or socioeconomic groups are unacceptable.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
Sixty percent of Baltimore's elementary and middle schools failed to reach their annual progress goals based on state test results, a target that principals still strive for but the city schools CEO sees as becoming irrelevant. Though Maryland School Assessment scores for city students in math and reading were flat or showed some gains this year, 85 of the 142 Baltimore elementary and middle schools did not meet the goals known as adequate yearly progress, according to data from city schools.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2010
Anne Arundel Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell says the school system will promptly examine its approaches to educating students after 21 county schools fell short of annual progress measures set forth by federal No Child Left Behind legislation. Recently released Maryland School Assessment results showed that six of the county's elementary schools, 14 middle schools and one charter school failed to meet the adequate yearly progress mark. The figures stood in sharp contrast to the previous year, when all but one elementary school and 14 of 19 middle schools made adequate progress.
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