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Adequate Public

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NEWS
March 9, 1998
THE CARROLL COUNTY Commissioners have laid the foundation for controlled growth in the county over the next six years, finally enacting the Concurrency Management Ordinance.The long-debated measure, rejected in nearly identical form by the commissioners just last month, aims to link residential housing growth with available public utilities and services.Some 6,000 building lots would be approved over the next six years, if the lots meet adequate public facilities standards.The intent of the new law is quite reasonable: to set minimum requirements for schools, roads, sewer and water, and public safety services in order to adequately serve new houses and developments.
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EXPLORE
June 11, 2013
Two projects in rather close proximity to each other are getting a lot of attention from the people who live near where they're proposed. While both have the potential to result in similar kinds of traffic problems, one is in keeping with laws already on the books, while the other will require a change in the law before it can be built. Specifically, plans to build an apartment complex of 285 units on 17.7 acres near the historic Mt. Soma farm at the southern end of the Bel Air Bypass are within what zoning allows on the land in question.
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NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | August 18, 1991
To discourage farmers from selling land to developers, county planners recommend that the county start its own program to buy developmentrights on agricultural land.That was one of several ideas planners outlined as they explained a rural plan to the County Council in aspecial presentation Tuesday.Michael Paone, an agricultural planner in the county Planning andZoning Department, said the county might consider paying owners of agricultural land with bonds instead of cash. Under such a bond-payment arrangement, landowners would be entitled to receive tax-exempt interest payments for 30 years -- the life of the bond.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
The Howard County school board, in the second vote this month, approved a measure that would determine which school communities are designated as capable of absorbing development. The panel voted to approve a chart that school officials craft to denote areas ripe for development under the county's Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance. According to APFO guidelines, school capacity must be deemed adequate before approve is given to residential projects, and the pace of such development must match elementary and middle school capacity.
NEWS
June 26, 1995
Whether politically motivated or not, the Howard County school board's decision to oppose an Elkridge housing development on the grounds it would exacerbate school crowding raises a big question. If the problem is overcrowding, why didn't the county's much ballyhooed adequate public facilities legislation put a stop to it? In other words, are the adequate public facilities rules adequate enough?Answering the question is difficult, in part because the school board has injected politics into the process.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2004
Harford Executive James M. Harkins said he will hold off on plans for a new middle and high school complex near Bel Air after the County Council's passage of a bill last week to limit homebuilding in crowded school districts. "I want to do Patterson Mill," Harkins said of the proposed $42.6 million facility, which is designed to eliminate much of the county's problem with crowded classrooms. "We need to do that school," he said, "but I have a fiduciary responsibility that I take seriously."
NEWS
August 28, 2005
ISSUE: Harford County Councilman Dion F. Guthrie has introduced a measure to extend the county's adequate public facilities law, which halts the preliminary approval of new housing construction in any school district with a school exceeding capacity by 5 percent. Councilman Richard C. Slutzky said the law has served its purpose and will not be needed when it expires in 2007 because construction of the new Patterson Mill middle and high school complex will be nearing completion. Moreover, Slutzky said state contributions to school construction could be in jeopardy because the state typically does not consider approving financing for a new school unless the capacity of existing schools is 115 percent or more.
NEWS
February 25, 1991
New Harford County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann has gotten off to a disappointing start. After portraying herself as a consensus builder in campaign literature, she has managed to upset quite a few people. Meanwhile, her actions and statements have shown that she is not particularly experienced in management or county fiscal matters.Initial criticism seems to have unnerved Ms. Rehrmann; yet she should be able to put this criticism behind herself. Her State of the County address outlined such a constructive legislative program that she now has an opportunity to forge a good working relationship with the county council.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | September 27, 2006
An Annapolis alderwoman's proposal to subject some home-construction projects to a building freeze is meeting with strong disapproval from some builders, developers and homeowners. Alderwoman Julie Stankivic, an independent who represents Ward 6, is trying to revive an amendment that would prohibit the owner of a home that straddles two or more lots from demolishing the home and replacing it with several houses. Her proposal was part of the original building freeze approved by the city council, but the council struck it down Sept.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1996
Several Howard County developers are looking to loosen the three-year logjam of housing projects in Ellicott City by changing the limits established by the county's adequate public facilities law.But at the suggestion of Joseph Rutter, director of the Planning and Zoning Department, most skipped last night's public hearing.However, Rutter predicted the developers will begin privately lobbying council members for changes they want.The adequate public facilities law is the county's primary means for controlling the rate of housing growth in the county.
NEWS
October 24, 2008
Last month, Sen. Barack Obama took in an amazing $150 million in campaign contributions - a number that increased his fundraising total to $600 million for the primaries and general election, topping the combined amount raised by President Bush and Democrat John Kerry in 2004. It's an extraordinary achievement, but one that offers sad evidence of the futility of a decades-long effort to limit the influence of money in American politics. Sen. John McCain, Mr. Obama's Republican opponent, chose to participate in the public financing program, which gave him $84 million to spend from Sept.
NEWS
October 9, 2007
Why does U.S. pursue cruel torture policy? Thank you for the editorial about the Justice Department's secret legal opinions allowing extremely harsh CIA interrogations ("Enforce the law," Oct. 5). Most people do not know that the Military Commissions Act of 2006 permits evidence obtained through torture to be used by military commissions, thereby codifying for the first time in our country's history a policy permitting torture. The recent executive order governing CIA interrogation does not close secret prisons or end the practice of kidnapping and sending prisoners for interrogation to third countries known for torture.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | April 8, 2007
There was consensus among County Council members last week that Harford's rural landscape is threatened, that its schools are crowded and that current policies have failed. How that would translate into votes on a bill tightening the link between elementary school capacity and new development, however, was tough to predict. The bill revised the county's adequate public facilities ordinance, bringing the county's criteria for determining school capacity in line with the state standard.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | February 11, 2007
Building homes near crowded schools will be tougher to do in Harford County, especially in areas near Bel Air where portable classrooms surround most schools. The County Council unanimously passed a measure last week that strengthens the adequate public facilities law, which limits home construction where infrastructure is burdened. The momentum for the legislation comes largely in response to parents concerned with crowded classrooms. Under the former law, home building could proceed in an area with crowded schools if a new school was in the planning stages.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | September 27, 2006
An Annapolis alderwoman's proposal to subject some home-construction projects to a building freeze is meeting with strong disapproval from some builders, developers and homeowners. Alderwoman Julie Stankivic, an independent who represents Ward 6, is trying to revive an amendment that would prohibit the owner of a home that straddles two or more lots from demolishing the home and replacing it with several houses. Her proposal was part of the original building freeze approved by the city council, but the council struck it down Sept.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | September 13, 2006
An Annapolis alderman has introduced legislation that would require that adequate fire, police, water and road support be in place before major new developments move forward. Alderman David H. Cordle Sr., a Republican who represents Ward 5, said the measure "has some teeth," and predicted that it would be approved before the end of the year, months before expected. "It allows for development to occur, but infrastructure has to be in place," Cordle said yesterday. "It may need some fine-tuning, it may not please everybody, but we're ready to listen."
NEWS
By Rosemary Mortimer and Maurice Kalin For and Rosemary Mortimer and Maurice Kalin For,The Howard County Sun | February 16, 1992
The adequate public facilities legislation package limits the allowable overcapacity in any county public school to 120 percent of program capacity. Members of the commission have asked us to explain this aspect of the APFO legislation.Public schools in Howard County, aselsewhere in Maryland, are funded in part by the state with a formula that utilizes a 30-to-1 student/teacher ratio. The gymnasium, cafeteria, media center and rest rooms, or core capacity, in these state-funded schools reflect the 30-to-1 ratio.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | September 23, 1990
A proposed law that would give the county's planning and zoning director the power to deny approval for a development if public facilities couldn't support the growth was unveiled at a County Council work session Thursday.The so-called adequate public facilities proposal was made by the seven-member county Services Study Commission, which has been examining the issue for about two years.After the two-hour work session, council members said it could be another year of public hearings and revisions to the proposal before the county decides what the law would mandate.
NEWS
February 8, 2006
Harford council continues school-linked development ban In a surprise move, the Harford County Council voted last night to continue until 2009 barring development in areas where schools are 5 percent over capacity - a compromise between the pleas of two council members that left neither satisfied. Councilman Dion F. Guthrie, a Democrat from Joppatowne, had introduced an amendment to the county's adequate public facilities law that would have eliminated a sunset clause increasing the standard to 115 percent in June 2007.
NEWS
August 28, 2005
ISSUE: Harford County Councilman Dion F. Guthrie has introduced a measure to extend the county's adequate public facilities law, which halts the preliminary approval of new housing construction in any school district with a school exceeding capacity by 5 percent. Councilman Richard C. Slutzky said the law has served its purpose and will not be needed when it expires in 2007 because construction of the new Patterson Mill middle and high school complex will be nearing completion. Moreover, Slutzky said state contributions to school construction could be in jeopardy because the state typically does not consider approving financing for a new school unless the capacity of existing schools is 115 percent or more.
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