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Adequate Facilities

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NEWS
March 23, 1993
In the debate over growth in Howard County, one argument often made against future development is that it would cause overcrowded schools and traffic jams, the result of which would be ever-increasing taxes.But rarely these days will the county's most vocal opponents of growth mention that Howard has provisions -- hashed out publicly more than a year ago -- to help alleviate the strain on infrastructure that growth causes.Omitting that fact from their arguments erodes the credibility of no-growth advocates, whose all-or-nothing approach ignores common sense and history.
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EXPLORE
June 11, 2013
Two projects in rather close proximity to each other are getting a lot of attention from the people who live near where they're proposed. While both have the potential to result in similar kinds of traffic problems, one is in keeping with laws already on the books, while the other will require a change in the law before it can be built. Specifically, plans to build an apartment complex of 285 units on 17.7 acres near the historic Mt. Soma farm at the southern end of the Bel Air Bypass are within what zoning allows on the land in question.
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NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
Responding to concerns raised by developers and landowners, Carroll County staff recommended yesterday that the county commissioners consider modifications to a proposal that revamps the county's adequate public facilities law. Under the proposal, residential development would have to meet more stringent adequate-facilities standards and pass two adequacy tests before developers could proceed with subdivision plans. The law is designed to prevent residential growth from overwhelming schools, utilities and emergency services.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
The Howard County school board, in the second vote this month, approved a measure that would determine which school communities are designated as capable of absorbing development. The panel voted to approve a chart that school officials craft to denote areas ripe for development under the county's Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance. According to APFO guidelines, school capacity must be deemed adequate before approve is given to residential projects, and the pace of such development must match elementary and middle school capacity.
NEWS
December 17, 1997
THE FLAP OVER Carroll County Commissioner W. Benjamin Brown's private meeting to seek an acceptable compromise with the development community on building of recorded lots was much ado about nothing.But it reminds Carroll County of the problems inherent in a commissioner form of government, where all three commissioners wear both executive and legislative hats. Such a meeting wouldn't have been a problem under a charter form of government, where those important powers are divided. And for all the criticism of Mr. Brown's methods, commissioners Richard T. Yates and Donald I. Dell indicate they are in general agreement with the proposal that came out of that meeting.
NEWS
April 14, 1997
THE CHAIRMAN OF the Carroll County Board of Zoning Appeals, James Schumacher, put it most aptly and succinctly: "It's amazing to me the project even got to us."The project, a 254-unit apartment complex in the most congested area of Eldersburg, was rejected by the board for badly failing to meet the county's adequate public facilities standards. Traffic-jammed roads, crowded schools and an overtaxed fire department were cited by the board, upholding an earlier denial by the county Planning and Zoning Commission.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | January 29, 1992
Council member Shane Pendergrass fired the biggest salvo yet at the county's proposed adequate facilities ordinance -- but to no avail. The council is expected to pass the legislation intact next week.Pendergrass, D-1st, offered six amendments Monday night -- most dealing with points of clarification -- to the plan at the council's work session Monday night.She also sought to allow builders to defer payment of an excise tax until late in the process in order to hold down housing costs. Shereceived support for only one clarifying amendment.
NEWS
August 27, 1996
AN ADEQUATE PUBLIC facilities law is not a ban on development, contrary to the wishes of some citizens in suburban counties that have one and contrary to the fears of the business community in Baltimore County, which does not.Adequate public facilities laws do not stop growth. They help prevent growth from outstripping the supply of schools and other basic services. If a developer is not willing to help pay for sufficient services, he cannot build. Such laws encourage growth in areas where growth is intended and protect taxpayers from footing the entire bill for new infrastructure.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
Responding to concerns raised by developers and landowners, Carroll County staff recommended yesterday that the county commissioners consider modifications to a proposal that revamps the county's adequate public facilities law. Under the proposal, residential development would have to meet more stringent adequate-facilities standards and pass two adequacy tests before developers could proceed with subdivision plans. The law is designed to prevent residential growth from overwhelming schools, utilities and emergency services.
NEWS
March 3, 1991
There's a right way and a wrong way to manage growth during a recession. The Howard County Council, in January lifted an unpopular cap on building permits, is choosing the wrong way. The council claims the cap is exacerbating a down real estate market and is in fact unnecessary at a time when builders are hard-pressed to fund projects. "I don't think our vote has anything to do with the intent and purpose of our growth-management plans," said Council President Vernon C. Gray.The issue isn't so much the permit limit as it is Howard's continued inability to deal effectively with growth.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
The Howard County school board is scheduled to reconsider Tuesday a measure that would determine which schools can accommodate new residential development. Each year, school officials craft a chart that designates the areas ripe for development under the county's Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance by labeling schools as open or closed. The ordinance ensures that roads, school buildings and other infrastructure can handle more residents. Recently, the school board failed to pass the chart, voting in favor of it 4-3. The chart requires at least five votes for passage and allows for the student board member, who has limited voting powers, to cast a vote.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | January 28, 2007
Though an effort to tighten a law aimed at limiting residential construction near crowded schools was defeated recently, a less-restrictive proposal is expected to come before the County Council next month. The law - known as the adequate facilities ordinance - was enacted in 1991 to prevent residential construction in areas with crowded schools. But it allows proposed development to proceed if a nearby school's enrollment has not exceeded 105 percent of capacity and if relief - in the form of a new or expanded school - is planned for the near future.
NEWS
December 22, 2005
The Baltimore County Council has decided to strengthen the county's restriction on development that might cause schools to become overcrowded. The change involving the adequate facilities ordinance directs the county's planning office to consider not only how crowded schools are today, but also how crowded approved developments are going to make them tomorrow. This is entirely appropriate. But, unfortunately, matters involving schools are rarely so cut and dried. There are occasions when development plans sit around for years.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY and TED SHELSBY,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2005
The debate over balancing home construction and school enrollment continues this week when the County Council revisits a measure that would preserve limits on development in districts where crowded schools exist. Councilman Dion F. Guthrie said he will reintroduce legislation at Tuesday's council meeting that would leave Harford's adequate public facilities law intact. The ordinance halts preliminary approval of new housing in districts that are home to a school exceeding its designed capacity by 5 percent.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2004
After years of loosely controlled residential growth that led to crowded classrooms and congested roadways, the Carroll County commissioners adopted a stronger growth policy yesterday that would require developers to meet more stringent standards before housing projects are allowed to proceed. With the unanimous approval of a revised adequate public facilities law, the three commissioners fulfilled their campaign promise to curb growth in a county where a yearlong freeze on residential development expires in less than two months.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2004
Two years ago, the relationship between Carroll County leaders and officials of the county's eight municipalities was marked by rancor and bickering. Former county commissioners blamed the towns for exceeding the county's growth limits. The municipal leaders shot back, pointing to the county's lack of growth controls as the reason for crowded classrooms, congested roads and a strained water supply. Since then, however, the county's relations with the towns have turned around. County and municipal leaders believe this spirit of working together is important as the county is close to adopting a revamped policy to better manage residential growth.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | November 24, 1991
The county's General Assembly delegation last week tentatively agreed to sponsor legislation that would allow the county to collect excise taxes from developers and use the money to build or improve major roads.The tax is tied to a complex adequate facilities plan that County Executive Charles I. Ecker intends to bring before the County Council in January.The tax, which Ecker expects will bring in $6 million annually, would be put into a "development road improvement fund."It would be withdrawn only if the county matches it at a rate of 2 to 1. Use ofthe money would be restricted to major capital projects.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | September 22, 1991
The county government hopes to introduce legislation tying development limits to school capacity next month as the first step in its proposed adequate public facilities program.The County Council and Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann reached a consensus Thursday night at a meeting that schools should be the first priority as Harford devises growth management measures to assure government's ability to provide services.During the next year, the county will consider how to stay ahead of growing demands for sewer and water, roads, public safety, parks and recreation and other tax-supported functions.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2004
Two years ago, the relationship between Carroll County leaders and officials of the county's eight municipalities was marked by rancor and bickering. Former county commissioners blamed the towns for exceeding the county's growth limits. The municipal leaders shot back, pointing to the county's lack of growth controls as the reason for crowded classrooms, congested roads and a strained water supply. Since then, however, the county's relations with the towns have turned around. County and municipal leaders believe this spirit of working together is important as the county is close to adopting a revamped policy to better manage residential growth.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
Harford County would curtail preliminary approval of home building in more than half the county as a result of a bill passed late Tuesday night by the County Council. After more than more two hours of public hearing and debate among themselves, the council members voted 5-2 in favor of changing the adequate public facilities laws. Under the bill, preliminary approval for new homes would be interrupted in any school district with a school that exceeds its enrollment capacity by more than 5 percent.
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