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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | January 26, 1994
Elected and appointed officials whose pension benefits were significantly sweetened by a 1989 law passed by the Anne Arundel County Council not only face having those benefits rescinded, but may have to pay them back -- with interest.A bill introduced Monday night by Councilwoman Maureen Lamb would require officials who received the increased benefits to pay them back to the county along with 4 percent interest.The council also passed a bill Monday night that converted the officials' pension plan to one that pays benefits based on employee contributions rather than years of service.
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BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest | February 7, 2007
Ron D. George Membership specialist AAA Mid-Atlantic, Arnold Salary --$35,000 Age --30 Years on the job --One How he got started --George lived in Williamsburg, Va., working at a small airport and helping his mother open a bed and breakfast inn. He then moved to the Annapolis area and began looking for a job. On a whim, he walked into the Arnold office of AAA to ask if they were hiring. Typical day --As a membership specialist, George concentrates on selling and explaining the various benefits associated with the auto club.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer broke from his fellow Democratic governors urging President Bush to sign a measure extending benefits to the unemployed because he prefers that Congress and the president find a solution not adding to the federal deficit, a spokesman for the governor said yesterday.Mr. Schaefer's 27 Democratic colleagues wrote the president and urged him to sign a bill that would declare an economic emergency and offer up to 20 extra weeks of unemployment benefits to some 3 million Americans who have exhausted their regular 26 weeks of benefits.
NEWS
By Thomas Ginsberg and Thomas Ginsberg,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 1, 1998
TRENTON, N.J. -- For years, part of the emotional debate over welfare in America was focused on this question: Are welfare recipients encouraged to keep bearing children by benefits that rise every time they do?New Jersey lawmakers four years ago acted to cut off recipients from additional benefits if they had any more children. Many other states followed suit. But the question remained unanswered.A long-awaited study in New Jersey meant to answer that question was released recently - with inconclusive findings.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Acting with near-unanimity on the first recession-relief measure of the year, Congress yesterday approved and sent to President Bush a $2.7 billion unemployment bill that would extend long-term jobless benefits for another 13 weeks.President Bush, who twice blocked similar attempts last year before signing a compromise bill, asked for the legislation during his State of the Union address only a week ago. He is expected to sign it.Bipartisan support and the lagging economy combined to speed the measure through the House by a 404-8 vote.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Ending months of intense debate within the administration, President Clinton will propose making it easier for states to deny additional benefits to women who have children while already on welfare, senior administration officials say.The decision aligns Mr. Clinton with those inside and outside the administration who argue that government must intensify its efforts to discourage out-of-wedlock births, which now constitute roughly 30 percent...
BUSINESS
By Newsday | September 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Senate Democrats and the Bush administration confront each other today in a showdown vote over the extension of jobless benefits.It's the second war on the issue in two months, and there are predictions that the outcome will be the same -- approval of a Democratic jobless bill by Congress and a rejection by President Bush that effectively will kill the measure."
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest | February 7, 2007
Ron D. George Membership specialist AAA Mid-Atlantic, Arnold Salary --$35,000 Age --30 Years on the job --One How he got started --George lived in Williamsburg, Va., working at a small airport and helping his mother open a bed and breakfast inn. He then moved to the Annapolis area and began looking for a job. On a whim, he walked into the Arnold office of AAA to ask if they were hiring. Typical day --As a membership specialist, George concentrates on selling and explaining the various benefits associated with the auto club.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush, setting up another confrontation with congressional Democrats, vetoed yesterday a bill that would have extended unemployment compensation for up to 20 weeks to millions of jobless Americans who have exhausted their benefits.Mr. Bush called the $6.4 billion bill "a poorly designed, unnecessarily expensive program." He signed a similar bill two months ago but refused to take steps to implement it.Yesterday, he urged Congress to pass a $2.5 billion Republican alternative instead.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | December 29, 1991
Marilyn Schreiner said she's glad Congress has extended unemployment insurance benefits for another 13 weeks.But the Westminster resident, who was laid off from her teller's job at Household Bank in early November, would rather be employed."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Ending months of intense debate within the administration, President Clinton will propose making it easier for states to deny additional benefits to women who have children while already on welfare, senior administration officials say.The decision aligns Mr. Clinton with those inside and outside the administration who argue that government must intensify its efforts to discourage out-of-wedlock births, which now constitute roughly 30 percent...
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | January 26, 1994
Elected and appointed officials whose pension benefits were significantly sweetened by a 1989 law passed by the Anne Arundel County Council not only face having those benefits rescinded, but may have to pay them back -- with interest.A bill introduced Monday night by Councilwoman Maureen Lamb would require officials who received the increased benefits to pay them back to the county along with 4 percent interest.The council also passed a bill Monday night that converted the officials' pension plan to one that pays benefits based on employee contributions rather than years of service.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | November 20, 1993
Interest groups ranging from patients to insurance companies yesterday picked away at a bare bones health benefits plan that could become the standard for small businesses across Maryland next year.During a daylong public hearing in Baltimore, many praised the benefits package as a strong effort to make health insurance more accessible to workers in small businesses. Most, however, found at least something to criticize.Hospitals opposed the $50 co-payment for some emergency room visits. Women complained about the lack of coverage for contraceptives.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Acting with near-unanimity on the first recession-relief measure of the year, Congress yesterday approved and sent to President Bush a $2.7 billion unemployment bill that would extend long-term jobless benefits for another 13 weeks.President Bush, who twice blocked similar attempts last year before signing a compromise bill, asked for the legislation during his State of the Union address only a week ago. He is expected to sign it.Bipartisan support and the lagging economy combined to speed the measure through the House by a 404-8 vote.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | December 29, 1991
Marilyn Schreiner said she's glad Congress has extended unemployment insurance benefits for another 13 weeks.But the Westminster resident, who was laid off from her teller's job at Household Bank in early November, would rather be employed."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush, setting up another confrontation with congressional Democrats, vetoed yesterday a bill that would have extended unemployment compensation for up to 20 weeks to millions of jobless Americans who have exhausted their benefits.Mr. Bush called the $6.4 billion bill "a poorly designed, unnecessarily expensive program." He signed a similar bill two months ago but refused to take steps to implement it.Yesterday, he urged Congress to pass a $2.5 billion Republican alternative instead.
NEWS
By Thomas Ginsberg and Thomas Ginsberg,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 1, 1998
TRENTON, N.J. -- For years, part of the emotional debate over welfare in America was focused on this question: Are welfare recipients encouraged to keep bearing children by benefits that rise every time they do?New Jersey lawmakers four years ago acted to cut off recipients from additional benefits if they had any more children. Many other states followed suit. But the question remained unanswered.A long-awaited study in New Jersey meant to answer that question was released recently - with inconclusive findings.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | July 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- With hundreds of thousands of workers running out of unemployment compensation benefits, the Senate Finance Committee today is expected to approve legislation extending benefits beyond the current 26-week limit, the committee chairman said.But the proposal faces an uphill fight in Congress, as well as opposition from the Bush administration.More than 18,000 unemployed workers in Maryland have exhausted their benefits, state officials say. Under the committee bill, they could receive from four to seven additional weeks of compensation.
BUSINESS
By Newsday | September 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Senate Democrats and the Bush administration confront each other today in a showdown vote over the extension of jobless benefits.It's the second war on the issue in two months, and there are predictions that the outcome will be the same -- approval of a Democratic jobless bill by Congress and a rejection by President Bush that effectively will kill the measure."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer broke from his fellow Democratic governors urging President Bush to sign a measure extending benefits to the unemployed because he prefers that Congress and the president find a solution not adding to the federal deficit, a spokesman for the governor said yesterday.Mr. Schaefer's 27 Democratic colleagues wrote the president and urged him to sign a bill that would declare an economic emergency and offer up to 20 extra weeks of unemployment benefits to some 3 million Americans who have exhausted their regular 26 weeks of benefits.
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