Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAddiction
IN THE NEWS

Addiction

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 23, 2010
America has suddenly become aware that there is a trade problem with China ("Export policy No. 1: getting China to play by the rules," Sept. 21). Once again, who could have predicted it? The American public is an addict. China is our supplier and the big discount chain stores are the dealers. We are addicted to easy money and bargain prices. The problem is that now we recognize that this is killing us and we want out of the arrangement. Whatever the solution, when an addict and his supplier break up, somebody is going to get hurt.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Jon B. Singer, a successful Baltimore businessman who was active in Jewish philanthropic causes that ranged from helping those suffering from drug abuse to mentoring young men and women starting businesses, died of pancreatic cancer Aug. 31 at his Pikesville home. He was 71. "His compassion and generosity knew no bounds. Even though he ran several businesses and was a devoted family man, he always found time to help those who were in need," said Jerry Sutton, who was executive director of House of Hope, a Reisterstown Road recovery facility that Mr. Singer founded for Jewish men struggling to overcome drug addiction and substance abuse.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 6, 2014
This letter is in reply to Dan Rodricks ' column in The Sun, "A long line of heroin deaths, Baltimore to New York" (Feb. 4). In his moving column, Mr. Rodricks bemoans the loss of so many lives, including that of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, to the ravages of chronic heroin addiction. Mr. Rodricks remembers some worthy people who succumbed to this addiction in Baltimore. He is baffled and distressed that addicts are jailed for their malady, rather than hospitalized and treated.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
State officials are hoping a new public health initiative to track the distribution and sale of highly addictive prescription drugs in Maryland can help reduce the number of people who abuse such medications. The initiative, inspired by a program originally developed in Kentucky 15 years ago, has led to a drastic drop in prescription drug abuse there, and it has the potential to become an important element in Maryland's overall effort to reduce overdose deaths from both legal and illegal drugs.
NEWS
June 25, 2010
America is witnessing an epidemic of hand held phone lust! We have become a nation of techno-addicts — and there is a trillion-dollar industry feeding the hunger! Those overnight lines for the new Apple device are a clear symptom. Why are we relentlessly tethered to instant communication? Today Americans suffer from isolation and loss of physical contact from one another. It's frightening to see folks crave the iPhone 4s ("Apple fans get early dose of iPhone fever," June 25)
NEWS
June 27, 2011
I think it's fantastic that Rev. Milton Williams is sticking his neck out on behalf of addicts in Baltimore by proposing to open his clinic to more people in serious need of methadone treatment ("Pastor to open on-demand methadone clinic at church," June 24). One thing the article did not mention is that methadone does not make addicts high but reduces cravings that lead to drug-seeking behavior and crime. However, it's imperative that readers know that methadone is also a highly effective primary treatment for chronic pain.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Howard Markel's "An Anatomy of Addiction" starts, like a shot, on May 5,1884. A Bellevue Hospital orderly summons Dr. William Stewart Halsted to save the leg of a laborer who has fallen from a scaffolding. Famous for the speed and virtuosity of his surgery, Halsted notes the shattered shinbone piercing through the skin — and abruptly retreats from the examination table, because he's not fit to operate. He takes a cab home and sinks "into a cocaine oblivion that lasted more than seven months.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2011
More than 20 years ago two neighborhood women, Jaye Burtnick and Gloria DeBarry, established a safe and warm place for the street people of the Cross Street Market area. "Their first epiphany was that almost all the guys who came there were veterans and they had addiction issues," said Michael Seipp, executive director of what is now called the Baltimore Station, an agency that defines its mission as "a therapeutic residential recovery program for men who are homeless largely due to chronic substance abuse.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 29, 2009
G eorge Gregory "Blue" Epps, a recovering addict and an addiction counselor whose struggle was depicted in "The Corner," the book which later became a critically acclaimed HBO miniseries, died of undetermined causes Nov. 15 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Highlandtown resident was 59. "We are waiting for the results of an autopsy for a cause of death," said his wife of nine years, the former Valerie Bolling. Mr. Epps was born in Baltimore and raised in West Baltimore.
NEWS
July 19, 2007
The first interim report on Baltimore's efforts to reduce heroin addiction through expanded use of a promising drug shows that the city's strategy is working relatively well, but that results could be even better with broader participation by doctors and hospitals. In a city with such abundant medical talent, that should not be an impediment to helping eliminate a major scourge. Baltimore's buprenorphine initiative is a worthy effort, led by the city's Health Department, to help addicts by using a synthetic opiate that is an effective antidote to heroin.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
Robert Taylor Jr., and Camille Haviland thought they were being safe - within the bounds of their dangerous heroin habit, that is. Having bought from a new dealer, Taylor tried just one capsule instead of his usual three or four. Haviland left on an errand; when she returned 15 minutes later, she found him collapsed on the ground, bluish and not breathing. She started CPR. When paramedics arrived, they injected Taylor with the overdose-reversing drug, naloxone. "At the time, I would have liked to have had this," Haviland said recently after she and Taylor were trained and certified to administer the drug themselves.
NEWS
September 2, 2014
The recent dramatic rise in heroin overdose deaths has reached near epidemic levels in Maryland ( "Overdose deaths are preventable," Aug. 29). The commentary by Deanna Wilson, Stephanie Sparrow and Jennifer Kirschner is an important follow up to the views expressed by Sun columnist Dan Rodricks , who questioned the accuracy of the reported number of heroin addicts in Baltimore ( "Heroin capital claim based on an old, bad number," Aug. 28). Regrettably, it appears that the rest of America has caught up with Baltimore's widespread substance abuse problem.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 28, 2014
What a difference four decades, a bad number, the war on drugs and reality television made: In 1975, National Geographic magazine devoted 27 glossy pages to the hidden charms of Baltimore. In 2014, the National Geographic Channel devotes an hour to the city's degeneracy and proclaims Baltimore "the Heroin Capital of America. " Some Baltimoreans might have saved that old National Geographic, from February 1975, because it provided a great boost to the civic ego. Numerous photographs accompanied Fred Kline's glowing prose.
NEWS
By Robert G. Newman | August 8, 2014
On June 21, the Vatican press office published the presentation made by Pope Francis to the 31st International Drug Enforcement Conference (IDEC) in Rome. The pope told the conferees, "The problem of drug use is not solved with drugs! … Substitute drugs are not an adequate therapy, but rather a veiled means of surrendering to the phenomenon. " These comments represent an unfortunate, categorical rejection of "maintenance" treatment of opioid addiction with medications such as methadone.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A veteran Baltimore County police officer was suspended this week and faces several criminal charges after the department said he tried to break into a Dundalk home in search of drugs. Officer Joseph Stanley Harden, 31, of Towson told investigators he became addicted to Oxycodone after a work-related injury. He was charged late Thursday with attempted burglary, drug possession, attempted robbery and malicious destruction of property. The department said he has been suspended without pay. His police powers also have been suspended.
BUSINESS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Maryland's largest and most lucrative casino threw an Independence Day party this month for one of its biggest neighbors: Fort Meade, the massive Army base just five miles down the road. In many ways, it was the archetypal Fourth of July civic event — one of the area's largest employers showing gratitude to the men and women who serve the county. A celebrity chef manned the grill at the USO on base, and the casino's top executives mingled with the troops. But courting military members can be tricky business for the gambling industry, because service members have a much higher rate of problem gambling than the general population does.
NEWS
July 16, 2011
A report last week that the University of Maryland Medical Center is one of 10 hospitals across the country this year that will begin offering new residency programs in addiction medicine is welcome news for Baltimore, which for decades has suffered from epidemic levels of drug and alcohol abuse and a violent drug trade that claims hundreds of lives every year. Estimates of the size of Baltimore's substance abuse problem range anywhere from one in 10 to one in six city residents. No city can make progress when such a substantial portion of its residents are mentally and physically disabled by substance abuse problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Influential alt-rockers Jane's Addiction and punk-rock vets Rise Against will headline the Shindig Music Festival on Sept. 27. Like last year, the all-day festival will take place at Baltimore's Carroll Park. Other acts scheduled to perform include Gogol Bordello, Clutch, Fishbone, Halestorm, Lucero, J. Roddy Walston and the Business, Larry and His Flask, The Mahones, The Bots, Charm City Devils, Bad Seed Rising and one more local artist still to be announced. An "early bird presale" will take place April 1-3, with a general admission price set at $50 and $150 for VIP. General public sale ($60 for general admission, $165 for VIP)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
The developer says his planned center for heroin addicts in a North Baltimore neighborhood would be revolutionary: a primary care facility that would treat all aspects of addict's lives, not just dole out methadone. But Harwood residents see it as more of the same for a community they say is already filled with people bused in for addiction services. More addicts, they say, lead to more public urination, drug use and crime. "When the lifeboat is full, the next person being worthy doesn't make it any less likely to sink," said Joe McNeely, president of a neighborhood coalition opposed to the center.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
A total of 60,000 heroin addicts in Baltimore: It's a number that has cropped up in news stories and public pronouncements in various forms over the years. But it's a statistic with murky origins and that some say is vastly inflated. Sen. Barbara A. Milkuski included the figure in a recent news release, using information from federal law enforcement, according to her office. A spokesman for the Baltimore office of the Drug Enforcement Administration said it's a tally agents there also recognize.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.