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NEWS
September 23, 2010
America has suddenly become aware that there is a trade problem with China ("Export policy No. 1: getting China to play by the rules," Sept. 21). Once again, who could have predicted it? The American public is an addict. China is our supplier and the big discount chain stores are the dealers. We are addicted to easy money and bargain prices. The problem is that now we recognize that this is killing us and we want out of the arrangement. Whatever the solution, when an addict and his supplier break up, somebody is going to get hurt.
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BUSINESS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Maryland's largest and most lucrative casino threw an Independence Day party this month for one of its biggest neighbors: Fort Meade, the massive Army base just five miles down the road. In many ways, it was the archetypal Fourth of July civic event — one of the area's largest employers showing gratitude to the men and women who serve the county. A celebrity chef manned the grill at the USO on base, and the casino's top executives mingled with the troops. But courting military members can be tricky business for the gambling industry, because service members have a much higher rate of problem gambling than the general population does.
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NEWS
February 6, 2014
This letter is in reply to Dan Rodricks ' column in The Sun, "A long line of heroin deaths, Baltimore to New York" (Feb. 4). In his moving column, Mr. Rodricks bemoans the loss of so many lives, including that of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, to the ravages of chronic heroin addiction. Mr. Rodricks remembers some worthy people who succumbed to this addiction in Baltimore. He is baffled and distressed that addicts are jailed for their malady, rather than hospitalized and treated.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
The developer says his planned center for heroin addicts in a North Baltimore neighborhood would be revolutionary: a primary care facility that would treat all aspects of addict's lives, not just dole out methadone. But Harwood residents see it as more of the same for a community they say is already filled with people bused in for addiction services. More addicts, they say, lead to more public urination, drug use and crime. "When the lifeboat is full, the next person being worthy doesn't make it any less likely to sink," said Joe McNeely, president of a neighborhood coalition opposed to the center.
NEWS
June 25, 2010
America is witnessing an epidemic of hand held phone lust! We have become a nation of techno-addicts — and there is a trillion-dollar industry feeding the hunger! Those overnight lines for the new Apple device are a clear symptom. Why are we relentlessly tethered to instant communication? Today Americans suffer from isolation and loss of physical contact from one another. It's frightening to see folks crave the iPhone 4s ("Apple fans get early dose of iPhone fever," June 25)
NEWS
June 27, 2011
I think it's fantastic that Rev. Milton Williams is sticking his neck out on behalf of addicts in Baltimore by proposing to open his clinic to more people in serious need of methadone treatment ("Pastor to open on-demand methadone clinic at church," June 24). One thing the article did not mention is that methadone does not make addicts high but reduces cravings that lead to drug-seeking behavior and crime. However, it's imperative that readers know that methadone is also a highly effective primary treatment for chronic pain.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 29, 2009
G eorge Gregory "Blue" Epps, a recovering addict and an addiction counselor whose struggle was depicted in "The Corner," the book which later became a critically acclaimed HBO miniseries, died of undetermined causes Nov. 15 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Highlandtown resident was 59. "We are waiting for the results of an autopsy for a cause of death," said his wife of nine years, the former Valerie Bolling. Mr. Epps was born in Baltimore and raised in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Howard Markel's "An Anatomy of Addiction" starts, like a shot, on May 5,1884. A Bellevue Hospital orderly summons Dr. William Stewart Halsted to save the leg of a laborer who has fallen from a scaffolding. Famous for the speed and virtuosity of his surgery, Halsted notes the shattered shinbone piercing through the skin — and abruptly retreats from the examination table, because he's not fit to operate. He takes a cab home and sinks "into a cocaine oblivion that lasted more than seven months.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2011
More than 20 years ago two neighborhood women, Jaye Burtnick and Gloria DeBarry, established a safe and warm place for the street people of the Cross Street Market area. "Their first epiphany was that almost all the guys who came there were veterans and they had addiction issues," said Michael Seipp, executive director of what is now called the Baltimore Station, an agency that defines its mission as "a therapeutic residential recovery program for men who are homeless largely due to chronic substance abuse.
NEWS
July 19, 2007
The first interim report on Baltimore's efforts to reduce heroin addiction through expanded use of a promising drug shows that the city's strategy is working relatively well, but that results could be even better with broader participation by doctors and hospitals. In a city with such abundant medical talent, that should not be an impediment to helping eliminate a major scourge. Baltimore's buprenorphine initiative is a worthy effort, led by the city's Health Department, to help addicts by using a synthetic opiate that is an effective antidote to heroin.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
A total of 60,000 heroin addicts in Baltimore: It's a number that has cropped up in news stories and public pronouncements in various forms over the years. But it's a statistic with murky origins and that some say is vastly inflated. Sen. Barbara A. Milkuski included the figure in a recent news release, using information from federal law enforcement, according to her office. A spokesman for the Baltimore office of the Drug Enforcement Administration said it's a tally agents there also recognize.
NEWS
June 26, 2014
Mike Gimbel's letter about a harm-reduction program that trains people to administer the anti-overdose medication Narcan was based on an outdated, stereotypical description of drug addicts ( "Narcan won't solve the problem of addiction," June 23). While there may be many drug addicts who "aren't good parents and can't do an honest day's work," I have had the pleasure to know many addicts who go to work every day, are good parents to their children and would be considered contributing members of their community.
NEWS
June 23, 2014
Over the years I have tried to educate the public about the disease of addiction and how a drug addict thinks and makes decisions. Let me remind the readers that a drug addict only wants one thing and one thing only - more drugs, at all costs. A drug addict doesn't care about their health, they are not fearful of the police, they aren't good parents, they can't do a honest days work and they will do whatever is necessary to get their "fix. " Therefore traditional public health methods to reach addicts and convince them to stop using drugs will not work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Reading one of Jennifer Weiner's contemporary novels of manners is a bit like biting into an apple. The experience is full of flavor, more crisp than juicy, and refreshingly tart. Partly, that's because the novels typically are narrated by a heroine who, like Weiner herself, is an acute and witty observer of social norms into which she doesn't quite fit. Weiner's 10th novel, "All Fall Down," features Allison Weiss, who has everything she once wanted - a husband and daughter she loves, an interesting job, a stately house in the suburbs - but finds herself sliding into an addiction to prescription pain medication.
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | April 28, 2014
When Samuel Bierman and Zachary Snitzer opened Maryland Addiction Recovery Center last January, they'd done their homework. The co-founders knew they wanted to be in Maryland, particularly Baltimore County. But they chose Towson, where their center is located at 110 West Road, for a few reasons. "It's centralized, and easy to reach," said Bierman, executive director, "and the biggest group needing help are 15-to-30 year-olds. That's a major demographic in this area," a reference to the local college scene.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
The sniffling began about 15 minutes into Chris Herren's speech. As the former NBA player recounted his battle with drug addiction, students throughout Southern High School's auditorium looked around to see who was crying. No one needed to look far. For the past four years, Herren — whose story of substance abuse was the subject of a 2011 ESPN documentary, "Unguarded" — has moved crowds with his gritty message at high schools, colleges and prisons nationwide. His talk at Southern High came at a time when county police say they're dealing with an increase in heroin use. Since the start of year, Anne Arundel County has seen 17 fatal drug overdoses — 13 of them involving heroin — according to county police spokesman Justin Mulcahy.
NEWS
July 16, 2011
A report last week that the University of Maryland Medical Center is one of 10 hospitals across the country this year that will begin offering new residency programs in addiction medicine is welcome news for Baltimore, which for decades has suffered from epidemic levels of drug and alcohol abuse and a violent drug trade that claims hundreds of lives every year. Estimates of the size of Baltimore's substance abuse problem range anywhere from one in 10 to one in six city residents. No city can make progress when such a substantial portion of its residents are mentally and physically disabled by substance abuse problems.
EXPLORE
September 1, 2012
Carroll Lutheran Village in Westminster will host the program "Challenges of Grandparenting in the 21st Century: Looking at Addiction Through the Eyes of Grandparents" on Friday, Sept. 14, from 1 to 3 p.m., as part of the center's recognition of National Grandparents Month. The workshop will feature presentations from Chuck Bosley, addictions coordinator at Carroll Hospital Center, and Dr. Janet Buchanan, vice president of philanthropy at Carroll Lutheran Village, who will discuss the signs and symptoms of addiction in youth and the use of technology in promoting substance abuse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Gilda Weinfeld from Pikesville said that last year during Passover, an acquaintance sent her some homemade chocolate-covered matzoh. She said it was absolutely delicious, and when she called her friend to thank her for the gift she asked for the recipe — and her friend politely declined to give it to her. Not to worry, Gilda, there are plenty of good recipes for homemade chocolate matzoh both online and in print. My go-to recipe for this holiday treat comes from "The Treasury of Jewish Holiday Baking" by Marcy Goldman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Influential alt-rockers Jane's Addiction and punk-rock vets Rise Against will headline the Shindig Music Festival on Sept. 27. Like last year, the all-day festival will take place at Baltimore's Carroll Park. Other acts scheduled to perform include Gogol Bordello, Clutch, Fishbone, Halestorm, Lucero, J. Roddy Walston and the Business, Larry and His Flask, The Mahones, The Bots, Charm City Devils, Bad Seed Rising and one more local artist still to be announced. An "early bird presale" will take place April 1-3, with a general admission price set at $50 and $150 for VIP. General public sale ($60 for general admission, $165 for VIP)
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