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By Karmen Fox and For The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Don's on the mend. Sort of. It was an admittedly slow yet steady start to the new season. That's how it should be with recovery. There was no jumping into massive transformations or profound moments of clarity. It was more of a catch-up to see how the dust has settled - or kicked up - in the past two months (in "Mad Men" time, of course). Are Don and Megan still together? Have SC&P rehired Don? Are Peggy and Joan this close to starting their firm to prove those chauvinists wrong?
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
The sniffling began about 15 minutes into Chris Herren's speech. As the former NBA player recounted his battle with drug addiction, students throughout Southern High School's auditorium looked around to see who was crying. No one needed to look far. For the past four years, Herren — whose story of substance abuse was the subject of a 2011 ESPN documentary, "Unguarded" — has moved crowds with his gritty message at high schools, colleges and prisons nationwide. His talk at Southern High came at a time when county police say they're dealing with an increase in heroin use. Since the start of year, Anne Arundel County has seen 17 fatal drug overdoses — 13 of them involving heroin — according to county police spokesman Justin Mulcahy.
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NEWS
September 23, 2010
America has suddenly become aware that there is a trade problem with China ("Export policy No. 1: getting China to play by the rules," Sept. 21). Once again, who could have predicted it? The American public is an addict. China is our supplier and the big discount chain stores are the dealers. We are addicted to easy money and bargain prices. The problem is that now we recognize that this is killing us and we want out of the arrangement. Whatever the solution, when an addict and his supplier break up, somebody is going to get hurt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Gilda Weinfeld from Pikesville said that last year during Passover, an acquaintance sent her some homemade chocolate-covered matzoh. She said it was absolutely delicious, and when she called her friend to thank her for the gift she asked for the recipe — and her friend politely declined to give it to her. Not to worry, Gilda, there are plenty of good recipes for homemade chocolate matzoh both online and in print. My go-to recipe for this holiday treat comes from "The Treasury of Jewish Holiday Baking" by Marcy Goldman.
NEWS
February 6, 2014
This letter is in reply to Dan Rodricks ' column in The Sun, "A long line of heroin deaths, Baltimore to New York" (Feb. 4). In his moving column, Mr. Rodricks bemoans the loss of so many lives, including that of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, to the ravages of chronic heroin addiction. Mr. Rodricks remembers some worthy people who succumbed to this addiction in Baltimore. He is baffled and distressed that addicts are jailed for their malady, rather than hospitalized and treated.
NEWS
June 25, 2010
America is witnessing an epidemic of hand held phone lust! We have become a nation of techno-addicts — and there is a trillion-dollar industry feeding the hunger! Those overnight lines for the new Apple device are a clear symptom. Why are we relentlessly tethered to instant communication? Today Americans suffer from isolation and loss of physical contact from one another. It's frightening to see folks crave the iPhone 4s ("Apple fans get early dose of iPhone fever," June 25)
NEWS
June 27, 2011
I think it's fantastic that Rev. Milton Williams is sticking his neck out on behalf of addicts in Baltimore by proposing to open his clinic to more people in serious need of methadone treatment ("Pastor to open on-demand methadone clinic at church," June 24). One thing the article did not mention is that methadone does not make addicts high but reduces cravings that lead to drug-seeking behavior and crime. However, it's imperative that readers know that methadone is also a highly effective primary treatment for chronic pain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Influential alt-rockers Jane's Addiction and punk-rock vets Rise Against will headline the Shindig Music Festival on Sept. 27. Like last year, the all-day festival will take place at Baltimore's Carroll Park. Other acts scheduled to perform include Gogol Bordello, Clutch, Fishbone, Halestorm, Lucero, J. Roddy Walston and the Business, Larry and His Flask, The Mahones, The Bots, Charm City Devils, Bad Seed Rising and one more local artist still to be announced. An "early bird presale" will take place April 1-3, with a general admission price set at $50 and $150 for VIP. General public sale ($60 for general admission, $165 for VIP)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 29, 2009
G eorge Gregory "Blue" Epps, a recovering addict and an addiction counselor whose struggle was depicted in "The Corner," the book which later became a critically acclaimed HBO miniseries, died of undetermined causes Nov. 15 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Highlandtown resident was 59. "We are waiting for the results of an autopsy for a cause of death," said his wife of nine years, the former Valerie Bolling. Mr. Epps was born in Baltimore and raised in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Howard Markel's "An Anatomy of Addiction" starts, like a shot, on May 5,1884. A Bellevue Hospital orderly summons Dr. William Stewart Halsted to save the leg of a laborer who has fallen from a scaffolding. Famous for the speed and virtuosity of his surgery, Halsted notes the shattered shinbone piercing through the skin — and abruptly retreats from the examination table, because he's not fit to operate. He takes a cab home and sinks "into a cocaine oblivion that lasted more than seven months.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Influential alt-rockers Jane's Addiction and punk-rock vets Rise Against will headline the Shindig Music Festival on Sept. 27. Like last year, the all-day festival will take place at Baltimore's Carroll Park. Other acts scheduled to perform include Gogol Bordello, Clutch, Fishbone, Halestorm, Lucero, J. Roddy Walston and the Business, Larry and His Flask, The Mahones, The Bots, Charm City Devils, Bad Seed Rising and one more local artist still to be announced. An "early bird presale" will take place April 1-3, with a general admission price set at $50 and $150 for VIP. General public sale ($60 for general admission, $165 for VIP)
NEWS
By Barry Considine | February 24, 2014
In 1982, the late Gov. William Donald Schaefer was running for his last term as mayor. He held one of those big dinners that politicians are famous for at P.J. Crickets on Pratt St. All the political leaders were there. I was the chef that evening and can honestly tell you this: When I arrived at the restaurant that afternoon, I climbed in to the back of my blue VW Mini-Camper and smoked a bowl of marijuana. That evening many of the attendees stuck their heads into the kitchen to thank the chef for the wonderful meal they had enjoyed.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | February 16, 2014
Dear Drew: I've been thinking a great deal about marijuana lately. You can't turn on the television without seeing breathless reporters talking about a new cultural enthusiasm for legalizing weed. Two states (Colorado and Washington) have legalized marijuana possession for personal use. And it's probably only a matter of time before Maryland joins the party - pun intended. You are now 14 years old. A high school freshman. Homework and sports dominate your life. Your goals are unlimited.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 11, 2014
One day in February 2000, I sat in a police car on Poplar Grove Street in West Baltimore to observe a reverse sting: Instead of attempting to buy heroin from dealers, undercover officers were offering to sell it to users. They cleared out the regular salesmen, took over their corners and waited for the customers to arrive. The police arrested 53 people that day, including the daughter of a prominent contractor and a fellow who lived in an upscale city neighborhood. Almost all of the other heroin addicts had driven in from the suburbs - from Cockeysville, Gaithersburg, Essex, Woodlawn, Marriottsville, Crownsville, Jessup, Ellicott City, Linthicum and Columbia.
NEWS
February 6, 2014
This letter is in reply to Dan Rodricks ' column in The Sun, "A long line of heroin deaths, Baltimore to New York" (Feb. 4). In his moving column, Mr. Rodricks bemoans the loss of so many lives, including that of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, to the ravages of chronic heroin addiction. Mr. Rodricks remembers some worthy people who succumbed to this addiction in Baltimore. He is baffled and distressed that addicts are jailed for their malady, rather than hospitalized and treated.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | February 4, 2014
Normally, I get neither sad nor particularly sentimental when celebrities die. But I'm really bent out of shape about Philip Seymour Hoffman's death Sunday from an apparent heroin overdose. According to friends, Mr. Hoffman had been living drug-free for more than two decades until recently relapsing. His death is a reminder that even a demon suppressed for a long time is never fully exorcised and may, at some point, burst forth with an arresting potency - an apt description, as it were, of so many of Mr. Hoffman's most memorable on-screen performances.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2011
More than 20 years ago two neighborhood women, Jaye Burtnick and Gloria DeBarry, established a safe and warm place for the street people of the Cross Street Market area. "Their first epiphany was that almost all the guys who came there were veterans and they had addiction issues," said Michael Seipp, executive director of what is now called the Baltimore Station, an agency that defines its mission as "a therapeutic residential recovery program for men who are homeless largely due to chronic substance abuse.
NEWS
July 19, 2007
The first interim report on Baltimore's efforts to reduce heroin addiction through expanded use of a promising drug shows that the city's strategy is working relatively well, but that results could be even better with broader participation by doctors and hospitals. In a city with such abundant medical talent, that should not be an impediment to helping eliminate a major scourge. Baltimore's buprenorphine initiative is a worthy effort, led by the city's Health Department, to help addicts by using a synthetic opiate that is an effective antidote to heroin.
NEWS
February 3, 2014
The death this weekend of acclaimed actor Philip Seymour Hoffman from an apparent drug overdose has left his fans and colleagues in the film industry devastated by the loss of a great talent at so young an age. Mr. Hoffman was 46 when he was found dead in his New York apartment Sunday with a hypodermic needle stuck in his arm and packets of what appeared to be heroin nearby. His tragedy was a reminder that heroin addiction has many faces, from the rich and famous to people of severely limited means.
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