Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAddams Family
IN THE NEWS

Addams Family

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
It has all the weight and nutritional value of cotton candy. But "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical that has taken up temporary residence at the Hippodrome Theatre, adds up to a mildly entertaining package of song and shtick. Revised since its New York premiere, which received a drubbing from the press, the show provides a workable vehicle for the characters first immortalized by the Charles Addams cartoons and memorably brought to life by the 1960s TV series. Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, who wrote the book, borrowed a well-used device to frame the musical — the comic collision of opposites.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
Fifty years after "The Addams Family" debuted on TV in black and white, John Astin still has that wild gleam in his eye and the same mischievous grin. With his thick mustache, albeit a white one, he could easily be Gomez Addams in his debonair golden years - minus the eyeliner, pinstriped suit and cigar. Now 84, the veteran actor recently told a rapt audience of student thespians at Glenelg High School what most people familiar with the popular show already suspected - a lot of his personality went into creating the patriarch of one of the oddest families ever on TV. Finding a part of yourself that you can meld into an authentic portrayal of a character is something all actors should pursue, he told the cast of the Columbia Center for Theatrical Arts' summer production of the Broadway musical based on the 1964-1966 series.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
Fifty years after "The Addams Family" debuted on TV in black and white, John Astin still has that wild gleam in his eye and the same mischievous grin. With his thick mustache, albeit a white one, he could easily be Gomez Addams in his debonair golden years - minus the eyeliner, pinstriped suit and cigar. Now 84, the veteran actor recently told a rapt audience of student thespians at Glenelg High School what most people familiar with the popular show already suspected - a lot of his personality went into creating the patriarch of one of the oddest families ever on TV. Finding a part of yourself that you can meld into an authentic portrayal of a character is something all actors should pursue, he told the cast of the Columbia Center for Theatrical Arts' summer production of the Broadway musical based on the 1964-1966 series.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
If such golden oldies as "Maniac," "I Love Rock 'n' Roll" and, of course, "Flashdance… What a Feeling" still run through your head, there's a show heading to Baltimore ready to scoop you up in a wave of feel-good nostalgia. Those songs played an integral role in a 1983, critic-proof Paramount Pictures release called "Flashdance," about a young woman named Alex who worked as a welder in Pittsburgh, but dreamed of being a professional dancer. Three decades later, along comes "Flashdance - The Musical," complete with the famous water-dousing dance scene that got many a teenage hormone racing in movie theaters.
FEATURES
By Judy Gerstel and Judy Gerstel,Knight-Ridder | November 12, 1991
NEW YORK -- Ooky spooky creepy kooky is not a vagrant sleeping under rags around the corner from the Mark Hotel, where the taxes on a suite with two beige marble bathrooms come to $346.50 a night.Ooky spooky is not even turning on the TV Saturday night and seeing radio shock-jock Howard Stern hosting "Lesbian Dating Game" with two busty blonds flanking a dour brunette.No.Spooky is 33-year-old producer Scott Rudin knowing in his bones that America craves a major attack of macabre and taking dead aim with a $30-million movie that's hot.It was Rudin's idea to make the deliciously malicious romp that is "The Addams Family," opening nationwide Nov. 22."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 22, 1991
"The Addams Family" is less a movie than an attitude platform. And the attitude being platformed is simon-pure Charles Addams, that giddy-chilly macabre sensibility that takes its evil comic charge from inversion: "Are you unhappy?" Gomez asks his wife, Morticia. "Completely," she says with a lanquid,satiated sigh.It's easy to see why the Addams cartoons that appeared in the New Yorker became so popular. They began appearing in the conformist '50s, when their subversive wickedness was bracing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 19, 1993
"The Addams Family," of two years ago, wasn't so much a movie as a series of dreary skits which set up the occasional static recreation of great moments from the oeuvre of the brilliant New Yorker cartoonist Charles Addams, who originated the macabre deadpan as a comic mode. It was OK if your taste in entertainment ran to dioramas.Of course it made a lot of money because, via an even drearier mid-1960s TV series, it was hardwired into the collective unconscious of the Big Generation spawned by the four years of artificial abstinence in World War II. It was like taking candy from a baby boomer.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 22, 1991
The stories that Paramount was worried about its new film, ''The Addams Family,'' were apparently unfounded. The film, based on the characters created by cartoonist Charles Addams, works.The ''Addams Family'' is a funny send-up of those fabled cartoon characters. It was directed by Barry Sonnenfeld, who has never directed a film before (he was director of photography on a number of films, including ''Big'').The music, done by Marc Shaiman, is a definite asset. Shaiman has designed the score to underline and punctuate many of the gags in the film, most of which work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Next season at the Hippodrome Theatre , a character in an iconic outfit will fly off the stage and into the house, soaring high above wide-eyed spectators. The chances of a mishap during this show-stopping feat are just about nil, however, since we're not talking about the guy who is supposed to zip effortlessly through the air in that unlucky monolith of a musical called "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. " Baltimore audiences will see instead a primly dressed woman with an umbrella over one arm — the famed governess who takes charge of children and adults alike in the well-traveled Broadway revival of "Mary Poppins.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,[sun reporter] | October 29, 2006
THEY'RE CREEPY AND KOOKY, mysterious and spooky -- altogether ooky. And when it comes to television comedy, they're about as good as it's ever gotten. Which means that this Halloween should be especially celebratory, since it's the first since last week's long-awaited arrival on DVD of The Addams Family, a mid-'60s sitcom centering on the most charmingly horrific misfits you'd ever want to meet. For $29.95, you can get the show's first 22 episodes, spread over three discs -- surely a small price to pay for more than 10 hours of television at its most hilariously exuberant, not to mention surprisingly life-affirming, For two seasons on ABC, from 1964 to 1966, the Addamses ruled as the happiest, most welcoming, most compellingly abnormal family on TV. The characters, loosely based on the single-panel cartoons of The New Yorker's legendary Charles Addams, quickly became pop-culture mainstays.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
Johns Hopkins University students scramble to sign up for a coveted spot in the acting and directing classes taught by John Astin. After all, who wouldn't want to study theatrical techniques with a famous actor? Internationally known for his role as Gomez Addams in the 1960s television show "The Addams Family," the Baltimore-born Astin has received Academy Award and Emmy nominations for his work in front of the camera, and also for writing and directing. Perhaps the most meaningful recognition came last December, when it was announced that the university's renovated Merrick Barn theater would now bear his name: The John Astin Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
It has all the weight and nutritional value of cotton candy. But "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical that has taken up temporary residence at the Hippodrome Theatre, adds up to a mildly entertaining package of song and shtick. Revised since its New York premiere, which received a drubbing from the press, the show provides a workable vehicle for the characters first immortalized by the Charles Addams cartoons and memorably brought to life by the 1960s TV series. Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, who wrote the book, borrowed a well-used device to frame the musical — the comic collision of opposites.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
After a performance of "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical now playing at the Hippodrome Theatre, a tall, bald, mustachioed man went backstage to greet the cast - the original, the ultimate Gomez Addams, John Astin. Douglas Sills, who portrays the head of the spooky household in the musical, dropped to the floor and did an elaborate kowtow. "You're a hero," Sills said. "Thank you for passing the torch to us. " That torch was lit 48 years ago, when the "The Addams Family" series debuted, fleshing out the slightly spooky, thoroughly contented characters created by New Yorker cartoonist Charles Addams.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
"The Addams Family" seemed to have everything going for it when the musical opened on Broadway two years ago: a book by the creators of the mega-hit "Jersey Boys"; two exceedingly popular stars, Nathan Lane and Bebe Neuwirth; and a title known to trigger fond memories and finger-snaps from any number of people who recall the 1960s sitcom of the same name. Then the reviews hit. They were about as cheery as the facial expression on Lurch, butler in the deliciously abnormal Addams household.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
It's official: Gomez has own theater. A newly renovated theater in the Johns Hopkins University's Merrick Barn was renamed Saturday in honor of the actor who originated the role on television of Gomez Addams, husband to Morticia and patriarch of one of America's weirdest clans on "The Addams Family. " On hand Saturday night to rename the 104-seat performing space "The John Astin Theatre" after its $210,000 make-over was Astin's close friend, the actor Ed Asner. Astin, a member of the class of 1952, starred in "The Addams Family" from 1964 to 1966, and returned to his alma mater in 2001 to teach acting and directing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Next season at the Hippodrome Theatre , a character in an iconic outfit will fly off the stage and into the house, soaring high above wide-eyed spectators. The chances of a mishap during this show-stopping feat are just about nil, however, since we're not talking about the guy who is supposed to zip effortlessly through the air in that unlucky monolith of a musical called "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. " Baltimore audiences will see instead a primly dressed woman with an umbrella over one arm — the famed governess who takes charge of children and adults alike in the well-traveled Broadway revival of "Mary Poppins.
FEATURES
By Steven Rea and Steven Rea,Knight-Ridder | December 13, 1991
To say Scott Rudin is elated by what's going on with his movie is to understate things considerably. "I'm in awe," says the producer, whose movie. "The Addams Family," happens to have topped $70 million at the box office in 2 1/2 weeks -- and happens to have become the year's pop-cult hit."It was seen by 11 million people in its first 10 days of release," reports Rudin. "There are kids coming out of the theaters, buying another ticket and going right back in. . . ."It's really just tapped into something.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
It's official: Gomez has own theater. A newly renovated theater in the Johns Hopkins University's Merrick Barn was renamed Saturday in honor of the actor who originated the role on television of Gomez Addams, husband to Morticia and patriarch of one of America's weirdest clans on "The Addams Family. " On hand Saturday night to rename the 104-seat performing space "The John Astin Theatre" after its $210,000 make-over was Astin's close friend, the actor Ed Asner. Astin, a member of the class of 1952, starred in "The Addams Family" from 1964 to 1966, and returned to his alma mater in 2001 to teach acting and directing.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | November 17, 2006
Aspiring screenwriters, take note! The second annual Baltimore Screenwriters Competition is open to any who submit a feature-length script and the $50 submission fee; winners will be chosen by a jury that includes John Hopkins University faculty member and actor John Astin (The Addams Family) and David Simon, creator of HBO's The Wire. Submit scripts no later than Jan. 16 to the Baltimore Screenwriters Competition, Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts, 7 E. Redwood St., Suite 500, Baltimore 21202.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,[sun reporter] | October 29, 2006
THEY'RE CREEPY AND KOOKY, mysterious and spooky -- altogether ooky. And when it comes to television comedy, they're about as good as it's ever gotten. Which means that this Halloween should be especially celebratory, since it's the first since last week's long-awaited arrival on DVD of The Addams Family, a mid-'60s sitcom centering on the most charmingly horrific misfits you'd ever want to meet. For $29.95, you can get the show's first 22 episodes, spread over three discs -- surely a small price to pay for more than 10 hours of television at its most hilariously exuberant, not to mention surprisingly life-affirming, For two seasons on ABC, from 1964 to 1966, the Addamses ruled as the happiest, most welcoming, most compellingly abnormal family on TV. The characters, loosely based on the single-panel cartoons of The New Yorker's legendary Charles Addams, quickly became pop-culture mainstays.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.