Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAdaptation
IN THE NEWS

Adaptation

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | August 2, 2007
As a performer, Felicia Curry is lithe, liquid, refined. She must be at least three-quarters cat, because she seems incapable of making any movement, including waggling her butt, that isn't a masterpiece of unself-conscious elegance. As is true of all felines, Curry's artistry is rooted in strength, hard work and discipline. It's faintly ironic, then, that she's starring in a children's show about the importance of breaking free from constraints. If You Go The Araboolies of Liberty Street runs through Aug. 12 at Imagination Stage, 4908 Auburn Ave., Bethesda.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Veteran strong-side linebacker Elvis Dumervil arrived at his second training camp with the Ravens last week bigger than he did the previous year, but said Thursday that he's adapting to his added bulk well thus far. “It was a little adjustment, but I think I'm on the right track, so I feel good about it,” Dumervil said Thursday. “[I'm] just trying to maximize every opportunity in practice, in training camp, so by Week 1, we'll be hitting and ready to roll.” Dumervil said he added weight - he's now listed at 253 pounds - for physical and mental reasons.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | September 22, 1992
Olney -- The musical of "Wuthering Heights" that is receiving its world premiere at Olney Theatre isn't quite misguided enough to be called "Withering Heights," it's more like the precursor of a new middlebrow genre: the Harlequin musical.On the surface, Emily Bronte's story of overblown passions and hot-blooded revenge might seem ideally suited for the musical stage. But the sense of diminution at Olney begins as soon as we hear the instrumental trio, which consists of a pianist, an electronic keyboard player and a wind player.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
The University of Maryland University College has long been at the forefront of online continuing education and job training for its mostly adult student body, so a recent proposal by UMUC President Javier Miyares to tie the school's future more closely to the private sector and adopt a learning model that lets students progress at their own pace seems like a natural evolution of the institution's history of innovation. The plan is still in the preliminary stages, with many details left to be worked out. But overall it could represent a way forward for an institution with a worldwide student body that has experienced declining enrollments, staff cuts and increased competition from for-profit schools in recent years.
FEATURES
December 20, 2002
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - The movie musical Chicago received a leading eight Golden Globe nominations yesterday, while the film version of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Hours got seven, and the comedy Adaptation had six. Along with Chicago and Adaptation, a comedy of in-jokes about its writers' attempts to fashion its screenplay from the nonfiction book The Orchid Thief, movies competing for best musical or comedy were the Dickens classic Nicholas Nickleby,...
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 20, 2002
SUN SCORE *** Resembling a realistic version of a fractured fairy tale, Adaptation is by far the funniest movie from Being John Malkovich screenwriter Charlie Kaufman. On paper it sounds hopelessly solipsistic and "inside." After all, Kaufman bases his story - about a screenwriter named Charlie Kaufman, who's in a death-struggle to adapt Susan Orlean's nonfiction best seller The Orchid Thief - on his own efforts to adapt Orlean's The Orchid Thief. But when Kaufman plops Nicolas Cage as a slapstick version of himself in the middle of the action, he forges connections with audiences stronger than any he hammers out in this year's earlier Human Nature, his forthcoming Confessions of a Dangerous Mind and even the intermittently uproarious Malkovich.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 30, 2003
The consequences of living with lies haunt Henrik Ibsen's Ghosts. This theme comes through strongly at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, where director Edwin Sherin has adapted and updated the 1881 Norwegian script, transposing it to an island off the coast of Maine in 1981. Although leaping forward in time is a bold move that succeeds on many levels, the script's stilted language often sounds stuck in the past. A controversial and even reviled play when it was new, Ghosts focuses on an aristocratic widow named Mrs. Helen Alving (Jane Alexander)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 2, 1991
NEW YORK -- "Originality," quipped Voltaire, "is nothing but judicious imitation."Though the degree of judiciousness varies, all four of the shows competing for best musical in tonight's Tony Awards ceremony (9 p.m., Channel 11) could be described as imitations. Each is adapted from a previous source; in some cases, even the sources are adaptations.Fortunately, originality is not a Tony category. If it were, few musicals would qualify since almost any one you can name -- from "Show Boat" to "My Fair Lady" to "Les Miserables" -- is an adaptation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 8, 1994
It's unusual for a playwright to write an adaptation of a contemporary play by another playwright, particularly when the adaptation and the original are in the same language. But that's what Edward Albee did in 1967 when he reworked -- and retained the title of -- British writer Giles Cooper's suburban satire, "Everything in the Garden."Although Albee's latest play, "Three Tall Women," has received a better reception in New York than anything else he has done in years, his adaptations have never been considered his best work -- even at his peak of popularity.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | June 22, 2004
Evil exists in the world of Cyrano, but is nameless, faceless and kept at a distance. A new adaptation of the story about the 17th-century swordsman and poet with the enormous proboscis is currently at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, and running throughout is the most old-fashioned, romantic, beguiling belief imaginable: that human beings are inherently noble. No wonder audiences have loved the play from the very first. It's true that there are bad guys in the world originally created by Edmond Rostand: aristocrats who will send a battalion of men to their deaths to exact a personal revenge.
NEWS
By Emily Blumenauer | June 16, 2014
I am tired. I am tired of the union, the newspaper, and other teachers telling me how I should feel about the Common Core and the new curriculum roll out. I am tired of headlines saying that teachers are resigning in droves and that the Common Core is ruining public education. I am tired of teachers writing editorials that compare the aftermath of teaching this year to having PTSD. These generalizations are ridiculous. Why? Well, partially because when teachers start whining and complaining about their jobs, it simply reinforces public opinion that teachers are lazy and only teach for the time off. Summer off?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
HBO's "The Normal Heart" will do something to you that TV rarely does: rock you to your emotional roots. The power of this HBO movie starring Mark Ruffalo, Julia Roberts and Jim Parsons is such that you can forget about turning off the TV after the final credits roll and going to bed as you might with most made-for-TV movies. This one, adapted by Larry Kramer from his Tony Award-winning 1985 play, will keep you up for hours in an emotional churn thinking about life, love, loss, death and politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Sarah LaCorte, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
The 16th Maryland Film Festival began this week with cinephiles carefully mapping out their plans and cautiously optimistic that a move from the five-screen Charles Theatre to seven different locations would not crimp their style. "I thought it would, but this was so easy," said Sharon Knox, who came to the festival's Tent Village on North Avenue on Thursday to buy tickets for three films. "Maybe being on North Avenue is a little more convenient than being restricted to that little corner of Charles Street where the Charles is. " Overall ticket sales were up "double-digits" over two years ago, festival head Jed Dietz said, although they were still behind last year's record-setting pace, when a strong crop of films with local connections led to a substantial increase in overall attendance.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
Loyola Maryland has been ranked No. 1, played in a number of NCAA tournaments, and even captured a national championship in 2012. But for the first time in school history, the team will host a conference tournament this season. As a reward for being the top seed in the Patriot League tournament, the No. 1 Greyhounds (12-1) are hosting the semifinals Friday and the final on Sunday at Ridley Athletic Complex. It's a new experience for a program that had to travel to Denver in 2011 and 2012 and Hobart in 2013 to participate in the Eastern College Athletic Conference tournaments.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Word from Hollywood is that former Baltimore Sun and Washington Post movie critic Stephen Hunter's 1995 novel, "Dirty White Boys," will be the next project for David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, the pair behind HBO's hugely successful "Game of Thrones. " Deadline: Hollywood reports that Benioff and Weiss have made a deal with Fox to write, direct and produce the movie adaptation of Hunter's novel, the story of a trio of violent prison escapees, led by the anti-heroic Lamar Pye, being pursued by a dogged state trooper.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Bruce Joel Rubin, who won an Academy Award for his screenplay for the 1990 hit movie "Ghost," did not feel a compelling need to revisit the work. Not long after the film's release - it went on to earn half a billion dollars worldwide - Paramount Pictures asked Rubin to write a sequel to the story of a young man named Sam who, after being murdered during a mugging, hangs around in ectoplasmic form to keep his beloved Molly from danger. Rubin resisted the studio's overtures. "I really didn't know where to take it," he says.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 4, 1999
Adaptations are never easy to bring off.And adaptations of classic theater by the likes of Aristophanes, Sophocles and Moliere are darned near impossible.How do you capture enough period nuances to do honor to the original while switching venues, modifying characters and bringing the declamatory poetic style of yesteryear alive for contemporary audiences?The folks at Colonial Players know how, because they have just opened a production of Moliere's hilarious 17th-century comedy, "The Learned Ladies," that's almost as feisty and fizzy as it must have been when France's greatest comic playwright had them rolling in the aisles at Versailles during the august reign of his benefactor, King Louis XIV.I doubt that the Sun King's retinue would have comprehended the hillbilly accents of the Nashville social climbers who provide the grist for Moliere's satirical mill in this adaptation by Freyda Thomas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 15, 2002
Charlie Kaufman is a parasite, in the best - and most cinematic - sense of the word. Hired to adapt Susan Orlean's nonfiction best seller, The Orchid Thief, for the screen, Kaufman - the writer responsible for the irrepressible Being John Malkovich - took the road decidedly less traveled. After agonizing over how to bring Orlean's book to the screen (no easy task, given its disjointed narrative, unstructured structure and knack for veering off in whatever direction tickled the author's fancy)
NEWS
By Cheryl Casciani | March 14, 2014
So, how about this weather? This question is often just small talk, but conversation about the recent weather has not been simple idle chatter. While Baltimore was bundled up against the frigid "polar vortex," Alaska saw record high temperatures. While Atlanta was virtually shut down in an unusual winter storm, California experienced a severe drought. Scientists predict climate change will mean more extreme weather - longer droughts, bigger storms and more extreme hot and cold temperatures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
A down-to-earth guy from a working-class city is determined to succeed in a tough business. Punching above his weight, he beats the odds and makes it into the ring, cheered on by a crowd that includes a woman who shares his modest roots and encourages his big dreams. That's not just the scenario of the wildly popular 1976 film "Rocky. " It also works as the art-imitating-art story line for the two Baltimore-area actors starring in the new musical version of "Rocky" that opens this week on Broadway.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.