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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
A Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist has won the 2011 Einstein Medal for his discovery of a mysterious force dubbed "dark energy" that is accelerating the expansion of the universe. Adam Riess, 41, will share the prize with Saul Perlmutter, of the University of California, Berkeley, whose team published similar results just after Riess' team. The prize has been awarded since 1979 by the Albert Einstein Society, in Bern, Switzerland, recognizing outstanding scientific work linked to Einstein's.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Description: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has detected a supernova that exploded more than 10 billion years ago, the most distant of its kind ever spotted. It was 4 percent farther away and 350 million years older than the previous record-holder, a supernova found three months ago by a team at the U.S. Energy Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. Researchers: David O. Jones of the Johns Hopkins University was the lead author on a paper detailing the discovery.
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NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2001
For an astronomer, Adam Riess would make a pretty lame tour guide to the night sky. He didn't grow up glued to a backyard telescope. He rarely gives the stars a second look after dark. And he's more likely to spot a Ford Taurus on the street than its namesake in the heavens. "I can find the Big Dipper. I can find Orion," he says, ticking off the stellar geography he knows. "After that, I would be struggling." But for answers to the big questions - What's the universe made of? How will it end?
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
Johns Hopkins University professor Charles L. Bennett has been awarded the Gruber Foundation's annual cosmology prize for research he led that formed the foundation for what scientists know about the makeup, origins and expansion of the universe. Bennett led a team of two dozen researchers from across the country and globe that used NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe to study what conditions were like about 380,000 years after the birth of the universe. The probe launched in 2001, scanned space until 2010 for data on microwave radiation, said to be a remnant of the "big bang" that scientists say marked the birth of the universe.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
The Baltimore astrophysicist credited with discovering "dark energy," the mysterious force believed to be accelerating the expansion of the universe, says he has used the Hubble Space Telescope to disprove a competing explanation for the phenomenon. Adam Riess, of the Johns Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute, says his team, using Hubble's new Wide Field Camera 3, was able to look at more stars, in both visible and infrared wavelengths. That eliminated errors introduced in previous work, which compared measurements from Hubble and other telescopes.
NEWS
October 6, 2011
As a recent Sun article ("Astronomers fret over Webb Telescope's future," Oct. 2) pointed out, I enthusiastically support the scientific mission of the James Webb Space Telescope. As chairwoman of the Commerce, Justice and Science (CJS) Appropriations Subcommittee that funds NASA, I'm also a fiscal watchdog who insists on value for every taxpayer dollar. I was the first to call for an independent review that found the Webb telescope was technically sound but poorly managed and budgeted.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Description: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has detected a supernova that exploded more than 10 billion years ago, the most distant of its kind ever spotted. It was 4 percent farther away and 350 million years older than the previous record-holder, a supernova found three months ago by a team at the U.S. Energy Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. Researchers: David O. Jones of the Johns Hopkins University was the lead author on a paper detailing the discovery.
NEWS
By Michael Corbin | October 16, 2011
I told some friends that Tomas Tranströmer had won the Nobel Prize. Some responded, "Who?" and others said that it was cool that someone in Baltimore had won the Nobel. This latter group, of course, had heard the local hubbub and were thinking about Adam Riess at the Johns Hopkins University, who (along with two other physicists) was awarded the Nobel in physics for showing that the universe is still expanding. Mr. Riess was able to infer this by observing close by and further away supernovae.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
Johns Hopkins University professor Charles L. Bennett has been awarded the Gruber Foundation's annual cosmology prize for research he led that formed the foundation for what scientists know about the makeup, origins and expansion of the universe. Bennett led a team of two dozen researchers from across the country and globe that used NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe to study what conditions were like about 380,000 years after the birth of the universe. The probe launched in 2001, scanned space until 2010 for data on microwave radiation, said to be a remnant of the "big bang" that scientists say marked the birth of the universe.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
A phone ringing at 5:30 a.m. can rattle anyone, even a professor immersed in the universe's mysterious dark energy. Adam Riess, an astronomy professor at Johns Hopkins University, learned in an early morning call from Stockholm Tuesday that he was one of three scientists to share the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics. Riess, a 41-year-old astronomy professor at the university in Baltimore and scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute, shares the $1.49 million prize with fellow American Saul Perlmutter and U.S.-Australian citizen Brian Schmidt.
NEWS
By Michael Corbin | October 16, 2011
I told some friends that Tomas Tranströmer had won the Nobel Prize. Some responded, "Who?" and others said that it was cool that someone in Baltimore had won the Nobel. This latter group, of course, had heard the local hubbub and were thinking about Adam Riess at the Johns Hopkins University, who (along with two other physicists) was awarded the Nobel in physics for showing that the universe is still expanding. Mr. Riess was able to infer this by observing close by and further away supernovae.
NEWS
October 6, 2011
As a recent Sun article ("Astronomers fret over Webb Telescope's future," Oct. 2) pointed out, I enthusiastically support the scientific mission of the James Webb Space Telescope. As chairwoman of the Commerce, Justice and Science (CJS) Appropriations Subcommittee that funds NASA, I'm also a fiscal watchdog who insists on value for every taxpayer dollar. I was the first to call for an independent review that found the Webb telescope was technically sound but poorly managed and budgeted.
NEWS
October 4, 2011
Tuesday's announcement that Hopkins astronomer Adam G. Riess will share this year's Nobel Prize in physics acknowledges his huge contribution to scientific knowledge. From the study of giant exploding stars millions of light-years from Earth, Mr. Riess and his colleagues, Saul Perlmutter of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California and Brian P. Schmidt of the Australian National University in Australia, deduced the astonishing hypothesis that our universe is being violently blown apart by an immensely powerful, previously unsuspected force.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
A phone ringing at 5:30 a.m. can rattle anyone, even a professor immersed in the universe's mysterious dark energy. Adam Riess, an astronomy professor at Johns Hopkins University, learned in an early morning call from Stockholm Tuesday that he was one of three scientists to share the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics. Riess, a 41-year-old astronomy professor at the university in Baltimore and scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute, shares the $1.49 million prize with fellow American Saul Perlmutter and U.S.-Australian citizen Brian Schmidt.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
Few understand the club that Adam Riess joined Tuesday when he received a 5:30 a.m. phone call from Sweden. But Carol Greider received the same call two years ago, and soon she'll sit with her Johns Hopkins University colleague and tell him what it's like to become a Nobel laureate. "It's going to be a complete whirlwind at first," the molecular biologist said after a news conference for Riess. "First it's the press, but then it's the academic community. I was getting 200 to 300 emails a day after I won. " A Nobel victory creates many ripples.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
The Baltimore astrophysicist credited with discovering "dark energy," the mysterious force believed to be accelerating the expansion of the universe, says he has used the Hubble Space Telescope to disprove a competing explanation for the phenomenon. Adam Riess, of the Johns Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute, says his team, using Hubble's new Wide Field Camera 3, was able to look at more stars, in both visible and infrared wavelengths. That eliminated errors introduced in previous work, which compared measurements from Hubble and other telescopes.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
Few understand the club that Adam Riess joined Tuesday when he received a 5:30 a.m. phone call from Sweden. But Carol Greider received the same call two years ago, and soon she'll sit with her Johns Hopkins University colleague and tell him what it's like to become a Nobel laureate. "It's going to be a complete whirlwind at first," the molecular biologist said after a news conference for Riess. "First it's the press, but then it's the academic community. I was getting 200 to 300 emails a day after I won. " A Nobel victory creates many ripples.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
A Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist has won the 2011 Einstein Medal for his discovery of a mysterious force dubbed "dark energy" that is accelerating the expansion of the universe. Adam Riess, 41, will share the prize with Saul Perlmutter, of the University of California, Berkeley, whose team published similar results just after Riess' team. The prize has been awarded since 1979 by the Albert Einstein Society, in Bern, Switzerland, recognizing outstanding scientific work linked to Einstein's.
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